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STARK COUNTY 

ILLINOIS 

AND ITS PEOPLE 



A RECORD OF SETTLEMENT, ORGANIZATION, 
PROGRESS AND ACHIEVEMENT 



ILLUSTRATED 



VOLUME 



Chicago 

THE PIONEER PUBLISHING COMPANY 

1916 



fJSRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBArJA 




JUDGE FRANK THOMAS 



_J^. ^ 






BIOGRAPHICAL 



JUDGE FRANK THOMAS. 

Judge Frank Thomas, wlio is now serving for the second term 
. jaupon the bench of Stark county, is a native of Wyoming, lUinois, his 
birth having tliere occurred September 17, 1848. He is a son of 
^ James M. Tliomas and a grandson of General Samuel Thomas, the 
"fo founder of Wyoming, Illinois. The common schools afforded him his 
preliminary educational training, after which he attended the North- 
western University and subsequently entered the University of Mich- 
igan at Ann Arbor, where he completed the literary course and was 
graduated. Subsequently he spent two years in the study of law there, 
and at the end of six years passed in the jNIichigan universitj' he left 
that institution with the degrees of B. A. and B. L. 

Immediately afterward INIr. Thomas returned to his native town 
and was admitted to the bar in Toulon in September, 1872. He opened 
a law office in Wyoming and was successful in building up a large prac- 
tice of a most important character. No dreary novitiate awaited him. 
He proved his ability in the trial of early cases, which indicated the 
thoroughness of his prej^aration and his comprehensive knowledge of 
law jirinciples. He was attornej' fo)- the Rock Island and Chicago, 
Burlington & Quincy Railroad Companies for about eighteen years. 
He also served as city attorney of Wj-oming for about twenty years, 
discharging his duties with marked al)ility and thus carefully safe- 
guarding the interests of the city. His elevation to the bench was the 
logical sequence of the splendid record which he had made as advocate 
and counselor and he is now serving for the second term as judge of 
Stark county. His career as a judge is in harmony with that of his 
record as a man and citizen — characterized l)y the utmost fidelity to 
duty and by a masterful grasp of every problem presented for solution. 
Judge Thomas was united in marriage in Ann Arbor, Michigan, 
on the 14th of September, 1872, to IMiss Anna Walsh, who was there 
reared and educated. She died, leaving two children, but the son, 
Harry Thomas, died at the age of eight years. The daughter, Katie, 
is now the wife of A. R. Seewald, a merchant of Terre Haute, In- 
diana, and they have a daughter, Fara Frances. Judge Thomas was 

5 

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I I I 09482 



6 HISTORY OF STAllK COUXTT 

again married in Wyoming, on tlie 12th of April, 1882, his second 
union being with JNliss Juha jM. Hoover, who was born in Peoria 
county. They also have two children: Anna L., the wife of Nelson 
L. Steer, a wholesale grocer of Peoria; and Julia B., attending the 
Toulon schools. 

Judge Thomas is a member of Wyoming Lodge, Xo. 479, A. F. 
& A. 31., and ^Vyoming Chapter, Xo. 133, R. A. ]M., of which he was 
high priest for twelve years, and is a loyal adherent of the teachings 
of the craft. He has long taken an active interest in local politics and 
for a time was identified with the democratic party but for a number 
of years has supjiorted the republican party. He is a man fearless in 
the sup2)ort of his honest convictions yet never bitterly aggressive. 
He is a student of the great political, sociological and economic ques- 
tions of the day and his opinions are the result of careful considera- 
tion of the policies which he regards as effective forces in good 
government. His fellow townsmen speak of him in terms of high 
regard, and his reelection to the bench indicates that public ojjinion 
and the decisions of the higher courts indorse his judicial record. 

Judge Thomas is a member of the First Congregational church 
of Toulon, and is one of the principal ^\orkers in the Sunday school 
of that church. His class of eighteen young ladies speak in the highest 
terms of him as a teacher, each one of them showing her appreciation 
of his work in this position by being truly loyal to him. He is a con- 
scientious anti-saloon advocate, which is ever in evidence by his work 
and contributions to that cavise. 



J. KXOX HALL. 



J. Knox Hall, a son of Dr. Thomas and Matilda (Manifold) Hall, 
is a native of Stark county, having been born in the town of Toulon, 
April 20, 1848. He was educated in the Toulon public schools and 
upon leaving school entered the office of the old Stark County Xews 
to learn the j^rinter's trade. Later he was associated with W. E. 
Nixon in the publication of the Stark County Sentinel. Purchasing- 
Mr. X^ixon's interest, .he continued as sole proprietor, editor and pub- 
lisher of the Sentinel imtil 188.5, when he Avas appointed postmaster 
of Toulon by President Cleveland — the first postmaster in Illinois 
to be appointed by the new administration. At the close of his term 
as postmaster he resumed literary work, in which he is still engaged. 

Politically jNIr. Hall is a democrat, though he is broad enough to 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 7 

respect the opinions of those who view the political situation from a 
different standpoint. For four years he was a member of the Toulon 
city council, at the time the waterworks and sewer system were under 
construction, and he has always taken a commendable interest in every 
movement for the improvement of his native city. In church matters 
he was formerly a Baptist but now belongs to the Congregational 
church. 

jMr. Hall is a prominent member of the JNIasonic fraternity, being 
a member of Toulon Lodge, No. 93, Free and Accepted INIasons; 
AVyoming Chapter, No. 188. Royal Arch JNIasons; Kewanee Com- 
mandery, No. 71, Knights Templar; and INIohammed Temple, An- 
cient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, of Peoria. 



HUGH MALLETT. 



Hugh Malk'tt, Avho throughout his entire life has engaged in har- 
ness making, conducting a profitable and growing business along that 
line at Bradford, was born in Milo, Bureau county, Illinois, on the 
11th of April. 187.5, and is a son of James F. and Mary J. (Haskins) 
jNIallett. The father is also a native of Bureau county, while the 
mother's birth occurred in Tioga countj% New York. They were mar- 
ried in Illinois, however, and are now residents of Lombardville. where 
they have resided since 1895. The father devoted many years of his 
life to general farming and is now engaged in stock buying. 

Hugh jNIallett was educated in INIilo and when seventeen years 
of age began to learn the harness making trade at Lomliai'dville, Illi- 
nois, being employed there and at Bradford until 1901, when he started 
in business on his own account. Tu August, 191.5, in association with 
W. F. Costello and others, he organized the .lim Dandy Collar Com- 
pany, of which JMr. JNIallett is the secretary, while INIr. Costello acts 
as manager. They manufacture a combination collar and pad in one 
and the estal)lishment now has a capacity of fifteen dozen collars per 
day and one hundred and twenty-five sets of harness per year. Mr. 
jNIallett has sold over four gross of collars from his harness shoj^ to 
the farmers of the locality and they have given general satisfaction. 
He is thoroughly honest and upright in his dealings and is known 
as "Honest Hugh." 

In August. 1906, JNIr. JNIallett was united in marriage to JNIiss 
Ruth Drawyer, and they have become the parents of three childi-en, 
James, Russell and JNIadeline. In his political views INIr. JNIallett is 



8 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

a republican, well versed on the (juestions and issues of the day but is 
not an office seeker. For sixteen years he has been identified with the 
JNIasonic fraternity, and both he and his wife are members of the Order 
of the Eastern Star. His success is due in large measure to the fact 
that he has always continued in the line in which he embarked as a 
young tradesman, never dissipating his energies over a broad field 
but concentrating his efforts upon the business in which he has devel- 
oped skill and ability. 



MRS. RHODA M. JACKSOX. 

One of the best known residents of La Fayette is jSIrs. Rhoda ^I. 
Jackson, who is a most active church woman and prominent in other 
connections. She was born in Fulton county. Illinois, and is a daugh- 
ter of the Rev. Amos ]Morey, a native of ]Maine, who with his parents 
removed in his childhood days to Ohio, the family home being estab- 
lished in Huron county, where ]Mr. JNIorey was reared to manhood. 
He there learned the trades of carpenter and cabinet maker and while 
residing in that locality he was united in marriage to ^Nliss Lydia H. 
Wright, who was born in the state of Xew York but was reared in 
Ohio. They removed from Ohio to Illinois, settling in Fulton county, 
where INIr. JSIorey worked at his trade but while thus engaged he de- 
voted all his leisure time to studying for the ministry and at length 
was ordained in the ]Methodist church, becoming one of the well known 
ministers and circuit riders of Fulton county in early days. Prior to 
his ordination he had served as a^ocal preacher for many years. In 
1857 he came to La Fayette and in his last days as a superannuated 
minister lived with a daughter on a farm in Knox county. 

His daughter ]Mrs. Jackson was largely reared and educated in 
Fulton county and on the 2d of November, 1859, in Abingdon, Knox 
county, she gave her hand in marriage to Edward L. Jackson. They 
established their home upon a farm in Knox county, where they re- 
sided for a number of years, but in 1901 they came to Stark county, 
settling in La Fayette, where jNIr. Jackson lived retired during the 
remainder of his life, his death occurring in the year 1910. 

To JNIr. and JNIrs. Jackson ^\'ere born three sons, who reached adult 
age, while two children passed away in early life. Cassimer reached 
mature years, was married and for some time engaged in business in 
Dixon, Illinois, but afterward removed to Alabama, w^here he passed 
away September 26, 1913. Amos JMorey Jackson is now a farmer of 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 9 

Oklahoma. The youngest son, Clyde, was married and for some 
time was a commercial traveler. He resided at Oshkosh, Wisconsin, 
where he died in January, 1907. 

jNIrs. Jackson is now numbered among- the old settlers of Stark 
county. She is a most earnest Christian woman, holding member- 
ship in La Fayette INIethodist Episcopal church and taking a most 
helpful part in church and Sunday school work. She belongs to the 
Ladies Aid Society and there is perhaps no one more familiar with 
the history of the churches in this part of the county. Her entire life 
has been guided by her Chi-istian belief, which has been manifest in 
many kindly deeds, her sympathy and her charity. She possesses 
many sterling traits of character which have gained her the ^arm 
regard that causes all to speak of her in terms of affection and good- 
will. 



C. J. DEISHER. 



C. J. Deisher, who is conducting a general mercantile establish- 
ment at Lombardville, has made good use of his time, talents and 
op])ortunities, ever proving loyal to the interests entrusted to his care 
and capable in the management of his business affairs. He was born 
in Osceola township, this county, JNIay 6, 1866, a son of James and 
Caroline (WoodAvard) Deisher. The father was born in Ithaca, 
New York, and when about eighteen years of age came to the middle 
west, settling on a farm which he continued to develop and imjjrove 
until fourteen years prior to his demise, when he engaged in the livery 
business, conducting his stables until his death, which occurred four 
j^ears ago. His wife had passed away when their son, C. J., was but 
five years of age. 

SiJending his youthful days in his father's home, C. J. Deisher 
attended the public schools of Bradford and remained with his father 
until he reached his majority. At the age of twenty-one years he 
went to ^Missouri but after spending a time in that state retiu'ned to 
Lombardville and assumed the management of the elevator there for 
the firm of ]Mallett & Code, with whom he continued for twentj'-two 
years, his long connection with that firm standing in incontrovertible 
proof of his ability, trustworthiness and fidelity. About three years 
ago lie established a general store in Ijombardville and is still 
conducting the business, meeting with excellent success in his manage- 
ment of the enterprise. That his trade has now reached large pro- 



10 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

poi'tions is indicated bj^ the fact that he runs two wagons in the 
country. 

On the 5th of January, 1887, jNIr. Deisher was united in marriage 
to Miss Lizzie jNlurray and they have become the parents of four chil- 
dren: Lloyd, who is engaged in business with his father under the 
firm st3de of C. J. Deisher & Son; Blanche, Avho is the wife of John 
Bell, proprietor of a store in JNIilo; Maud, who is a school teacher: and 
Ray, at home. 

The family are members of the JNIethodist Episcopal church, and 
]Mr. Deisher exercises his right of franchise in support of the men and 
measures of the democratic party. He may truly be called a self- 
made man and deserves all the credit which that term implies. Through 
his own eff'orts he has built up a business of gratifying proportions 
and in 191.5 the sales of the firm of C. J. Deisher & Son amounted to 
over sixty-five thousand dollars. His plans are carefully formulated 
and i^romptly executed. He studies the business situation thoroughly, 
knows the demands of the trade and through liberal purchases is al)le to 
meet the wishes of his patrons. He has ever recognized the fact that 
satisfied patrons are the best advertisement and along that line he has 
built up a business of gratifying proportions. 



L M. SPENCER. 



I. M. Spencer is to a considerable extent living retired although 
he still makes his home on his farm on section 11, Elmira township, 
where he owns two hundred acres of valuable land, and Avhere he has 
now resided for the long period of seventy-six years. He has now 
passed the seventy-sixth milestone on life's journey, his birth having 
occurred on the 9th of June, 184.0, about a half mile west of his pres- 
ent residence. There are few citizens of this section of the state who 
have so long resided here and through three-quarters of a century ^Ir. 
Spencer has been a witness of and a participant in the events whicli 
have shaped the history of Stark county. 

He is a son of Isaac P. and Eunice Clarinda (Gardiner) Spencer, 
the former a native of Caledonia county, Vermont, and the latter of 
Onondaga county, New York. In the spring of 183.5 Isaac P. Sjien- 
cer arrived in Peoria county, Illinois, and it was in that county that 
he was married. The following year he came to Stark county and 
located a claim, whereon he took up his abode in 1837. He built the 
first brick house in tlie neighborhood, his home being on section 10. 




I. M. SPEXl 1:K and lAillLV 



LiBRARV 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLIfWiS 

URBAiMA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 13 

Osceola township. Xot a furrow had been turned nor an improve- 
ment made upon his land, and he faced all of the hardships and priva- 
tions of pioneer life in attempting to establish himself in this locality. 
^Vhile upon his first tract of land he also operated a brick kiln and he 
made the bricks which were used in the erection of the first brick house 
in Elmira township, built in 184.2. His son afterward razed that 
house and upon the site erected his present residence. The father 
occupied the old home until his death, which occurred in 1884, and 
throughout the entire period of his residence in this county followed 
the occupation of farming. The work of development seemed scarcely 
begun at the time of his arrival. The forests were uncut and on the 
pi'airies grew the native grasses starred with millions of wild fiowers 
in June, while in the winter seasons the entire countryside was covered 
with an unbroken sheet of snow. Comparatively few roads had been 
laid out and the greater part of the land was still in possession of the 
government, so that the family shared in all of the difi^erent phases 
of pioneer life and later development. The mother passed away in 
1873 and was laid to rest in the Osceola cemetery. 

I. M. Spencer pursued his early education in a little log school 
building erected in the midst of the timber, and later he had the benefit 
of a few terms' instruction in a school at Galesburg. He early began 
assisting in the work of the fields and was thus busily engaged imtil 
the outbreak of the Civil war. He watched with interest the progress 
of events which culminated in the attack on Fort Sumter and his 
patriotic spirit w^as at once aroused. On the 17th of June, 1861, he 
ofi^ered his services to the government and joined the boys in blue of 
Company B, Nineteenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, to serve for 
three years, or during the war. He enlisted as a private and, ])os- 
sessing musical talent, was called upon to serve as fifer and bugler, 
being chief bugler of his regiment during the last two years of his 
service, which was terminated on the 9th of July, 18(U. when he re- 
ceived his honorable discharge. He took part in every engagement 
with his regiment, including the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga. 
INIissionary Ridge, Resaca and others. 

With a most creditable military record INIr. Spencer returned to 
his home, having given valuable aid to the country in defending the 
Union. He had been reared to farm life and resumed agricultural 
pursuits but soon afterward went into a store at Osceola, where he 
remained for twelve years. This was one of the first stores of the 
town and the building occupied was one which had been erected l)y 
his father. At the end of his mercantile experience Mr. Spencer 
resumed farming, in which lie continued until 1003, since which time 



14 HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 

he has hved retired to a greater or less extent, although he still occu- 
pies the old homestead, where he owns two hundred acres of valual)le 
land that returns to him a gratifying annual income. 

jNIr. Spencer was married in 1871 to Miss Rose Franklin, and 
they have three children: Ralph, who is on a farm near his father's 
place; Dana, living hi Santa Rosa. California: and Raymond, of 
Kewanee. Illinois. 

In politics, ]Mr. Spencer has lojig heen an earnest and stalwart 
rejjuhlican, and he has served as tax collector, for several terms as 
school director and for many years as school trustee. His wife is a 
member of the Baptist church, and he attends religious services at 
ilitt'erent churches in his home locality. He belongs to the Grand 
Army post at Osceola, of which he is now commander, and he has 
nearly always attended the state and national encamjiments, finding- 
great pleasure in this association with his old army comrades. He is 
a well read man, always keeping in touch with modern thought and 
progress and well informed on the leading questions and issues of the 
day. His life at all times has been active, upright and honorable, and 
there is no one more deserving of mention in this volume than this 
honored pioneer settler and war A-eteran. 



A. J. ADAMS. 



A. J. Adams, who holds the responsible position of cashier of 
th.e National Bank of Wyoming, was born in Penn township, Stark 
county, on the 5th of April, 1878. His father, Robert A. Adams, was 
a son of .John Adams and was a fai-mer by occupation. He was mar- 
ried to ^liss ]Mary E. Eai'hart, who is still living at Castleton. They 
were the parents of five children, of whom only two survive: A. J.; 
and Harry F., Avho resides upon the home farm. 

A. J. Adams was reared under the parental roof and had the 
usual experiences of tlie farm boy. early gaining training in agri- 
cultural work and in habits of industry and thrift. He was given 
excellent educational opportunities as after attending the country 
schools he entered Knox College and still later took a course in the 
Gem City Business College, from which he was graduated in 1898. 
Entering the business world, he secured a position in a store at Castle- 
ton and later turned his attention to banking, serving for two years 
as manager of the Scott-Wrigley & Walters branch bank at Castle- 
ton. Later he came to Wyoming as assistant cashier of tlie National 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 15 

Bank and after serving in that capacit}^ was made cashier. For se\en 
years he has directed the policy of the institution and its prosperity 
testifies to his knowledge of husiness conditions, his sound judgment 
and his familiarity with banking routine. 

Mr. Adams was married in 1900 to Miss Delilah ^Miller, a native 
of Iowa, and they have become the parents of a daughter. ^Vrline. IMr. 
Adams is a republican in his political, belief and keeps well informed 
as to the questions and issues before the people. The principles which 
guide his life are found in the teachings of the Congregational church, 
and he is always ready to aid movements seeking the moral advance- 
ment of his community. He is recognized as a leader in local banking- 
circles and personally he has gained the warm friendship of those who 
have been closely associated with him. 



JAMES A. XOWLAN. 

James A. Nowlan was born in Toulon on the 12th of April, 1873, 
a son of James and Xellie A. (Plummer) Xowlan, the former a son 
of ^Michael and Frances (Kearney) Xowlan, natives respectively of 
Carlow and Wexford covmties, Ireland. James X^owlan, father of the 
subject of this sketch, was born at Grafton, JNIassachusetts, on the 
6th of February, 1837. and in 184'0 accomi)anied his ])arents and 
the other children on their removal \vest, the family locating in Goshen 
township. Stark county, Illinois. He became a resident of Toulon 
in early manhood and resided there for many years, or until his death 
in 1900. His wife survives and is still living in that city. 

James A. Xowlan was graduated from the local high school with 
the class of 1890 and seven j^ears later, in partnership with Charles 
E. X^ixon, purchased the Stark County Xews. They published the 
paper together until 1904. when ]Mr. Xowlan bought his jiartner's 
interests, becoming sole proprietor of the journal. He has since been 
alone in business and has adhered to the highest standards of journal- 
ism. The typographical work of the paper is of a high order, the 
news columns give complete and reliable accounts of happenings of 
general interest, and the editorial page is devoted to the u])]niilding 
of the interests of Toulon and Stark county. ]Mr. Xowlan has ])rovcd 
not only an excellent editor but also a man of keen business insight 
and enterprise, and the paper has retvu-ned him a good profit. On the 
1st of January, 1915, he purchased The Galva Standard, and a year 



16 HISTOllY OF STxVllK COUNTY 

later bought The Galva News, combining the two publications under 
the latter name. 

jMr. Xowlan was married on the 15th of April, 1904, to Miss Cora 
De ]M. Townsend, of Wyoming, Illinois, a daughter of William J. 
and Jane E. Townsend. To this union have been born five children, 
three sons and two daughters. 

Mr. Xowlan is a stanch advocate of republican principles and 
personally and through his papers has been an influential factor in 
republican success in this section of the state. He has served as alder- 
man, as city treasurer and has held other minor offices, at all times 
proving a capable and conscientious public servant. He is associated 
with the blue lodge and other bodies of the ^Masonic order and in his 
daily life exemplifies the spirit of fratei-nity which is at the basis of 
that organization. 



C. G. THURSTOX. 



C. G. Thurston, who was born upon the farm which he is no^v 
ojjerating on section 33, Penn township, has proved very efficient 
as an agriculturist and stock raiser and has gained a gratifying meas- 
ure of success. His natal day was the I7th of IVIarch, 1878, and he 
is a son of Daniel S. and Clarinda (]McIvinnis) Thurston. The father 
was born in Tioga county, X^ew York, but became an early settler of 
Stark county, Illinois, where he develoi^ed a tract of raw prairie land 
into a highly improved farm. He died in this county presumably on 
the 17th of November, 1896. He was a democrat in politics and 
served as supervisor and school director. His wife, who was a native 
of Oliio, passed away in December, 1912, and both were buried in 
Pleasant Valley cemetery. 

C. G. Thurston attended the common schools and was also a stu- 
dent in the high school at Wyoming, Illinois, thus receiving a thorough 
education. He has devoted his life to farming and now owns sixty- 
five acres of the old homestead and operates two hundred and forty 
acres. He is breeding Duroc-Jersey hogs in addition to raising the 
usual crops and both branches of his business are profitable. About 
eight years ago he became the local representative for the Oxweld 
Acetylene Company and in the intervening time he has installed a 
number of lighting plants in residences in his locality. 

INIr. Thurston supjiorts the republican j^arty and is now filling 
tlie office of school director. He is a member of the 3Iethodist Prof- 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 17 

estant church and f raternallj^ is connected with the JModern Woodmen 
of America at Castleton and the Odd Fellows at Wyonnng. He 
realizes that enterprise and progressiveness are necessary to succeed 
in farming as well as in other fields of activity and has based his suc- 
cess upon the su]"e foundation of industry and good judgment. 



CHARLES P. DEWEY. 

Prominent among the enterprising, progressive and farsighted 
business men of Toulon is Charles P. Dewey, financier and banker, 
who for more than forty years has been identified with the moneyed 
interests of the county. He is honored and respected by all, not 
alone by reason of the success he has achieved but also owing to the 
straightforward business policy which he has ever followed. Stark 
county numbers him among her native sons. He was born July 28, 
18.57. a son of Samuel INI. Dewey, a native of Hanover, New Hamp- 
shire, and a grandson of Andrew Dewey. The former was reared in 
the old Granite state to the age of eighteen years and pursued his 
education in the schools there. He afterward went to Boston, where 
he remained for four years and subsequently he became a resident of 
Stark county. 

Charles P. Dewey spent his youthful days under the parental 
roof and supplemented his early education, obtained in the common 
schools, by study in Wheaton College, where he remained for two 
years. He then returned to Toulon and for a year or more was con- 
nected with mercantile interests but later entered a bank as book- 
keeper. He worked his way ujiward to the position of cashier and in 
1870 purchased an interest in the business. Upon the death of his 
partner, Samuel Burge, lie became head of the banking house and 
for years carried on the business in the same locality. The firm of 
Dewey, Burge & Gould conducts a general banking business and en- 
joys the unqualified confidence of the entire community. Their busi- 
ness methods are thoroughly reliable as well as progressive and their 
interests have been conducted with a recognition of the fact that the 
bank is most worthy of support which most carefully safeguards the 
interests of its depositors. In addition to his banking interests JMr. 
Dewey is the owner of several farms in Stark county and has handled 
considerable improved farm property, winning substantial success in 
that way. 

At Wayne, Illinois, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Dewev 



18 HISTOKY OF STAliK COUNTY 

and ]Mi.ss Flora I. Dunham, who was there horn and reared, a (hmgh- 
ter of Fsquire Daniel Dunham, a very prominent citizen of Wayne. 
Five children have been born of this marriage: Olive C, the wife 
of Thomas G. Plant, of ]Moultonboro, New Hampshire; jNlills, who 
is cashier in the bank; Charles P., who is engaged in the real estate 
and loan business in Salt Lake City; ^Maurice A., who was educated 
at the Phillips Academy in Andover, ^Massachusetts, and is now at 
home; and ]Marilla 1., who is a student in the Toulon schools. 

]Mr. Dewey and his wife have been members of the Congregational 
church of Toulon for twenty-five years and he has taken an active 
part in both church and Sunday school work. He contributes gen- 
erously to its support and stands at all times for the benefit and up- 
building of the community along material, intellectual, social and 
moral lines. His political allegiance is given to the reiJublican party, 
but while he keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the 
day, he has never sought nor desired office, preferring to concentrate 
his energies upon his business affairs, and by his close application, 
indefatigable energy and persistency of purpose he has reached the 
plane of affluence and is numbered among the most substantial resi- 
dents of his count v. 



ROBERT L. BREEN, 



Robert L. Breen, Avho is editor and half owner of the Bradford 
Republican, has made that paper one of the best of the country jour- 
nals of Illinois and is recognized as one of the foremost citizens of 
Bradford. He was born in Lewistown, Fulton county, this state, 
on the 24th of ^lay, 1878, a son of William and Rosa (JMul crone) 
Bieen, natives respectively of Tipperary and of County JNIayo, Ire- 
land. The father was born in 1823 and remained in his native land 
until he attained mature years, after which he came to the United 
States and was employed for some time on government works in the 
south. After working in various states he removed to Iowa and pur- 
chased land at a dollar and a quarter per acre, which he subsequently 
sold at five dollars per acre. He was the first of his family to come to 
the United States, and after he had been here for some time he sent 
for his two sisters, who joined him. Following his marriage he en- 
gaged in the coal business at Lewistown, Illinois, and also had the con- 
tract for carrying mail from Lewistown to Havana for many years. 
On retiring from active life he removed to Lacon. Illinois, where he 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 19 

died ill 181)9, when seveiitj'-six years of age. His religious belief was 
that of the Catholic church, and in politics he was a democrat. His 
wife, who was born on the 7th of Juh^ 1889, was brought to the United 
States by her mother in 1849 and lived for three j'ears in Cairo. Illi- 
nois, after which removal was made to Lewistown, where she was mar- 
ried on Thanksgiving day of 1857. She, too, passed away in Lacon, 
her demise occurring on the 20th of November, 1907. She was a 
faithful communicant of the Catholic church. By her marriage she 
became the mother of twelve children, two of whom died in infancy, 
the others being: JMary, who gave her hand in marriage to Thomas F. 
McEntee, of Lacon; Lawrence, who was drowned in the Chicago 
river on the 5th of September, 1913; Bridget, wife of the late Frank 
Porch, of Lacon; Katherine, who married Thomas F. O'Brien, of 
Oak Park, Illinois; William F., a resident of Toluca, this state; John, 
who is living in Lacon; Edward, who died July 13, 1914; Robert L.; 
and David V. and Thomas G., both of Lacon. 

Robert L. Breen was seven years of age when the family removed 
to Lacon, and he attended a parochial school there until he was thir- 
teen years old, when he entered the office of the old Lacon Democrat 
and began learning the printer's trade. He was promoted from time 
to time and when he left that office in 1902 held the position of fore- 
man. In that year he went to Kewanee, Illinois, and became con- 
nected with the Star-Courier, M'ith which he was identified for six 
years, working in various departments. In jMarch, 1907, he came 
to Bradford and together with others purchased the Bradford Repub- 
lican, of which he is now half owner. He is also editor and manager 
of the paper and its growth in circulation and advertising patronage 
is largely due to his able direction of its affairs. He understands e\'ery- 
thing in connection with the publication of the paper, the typograph- 
ical work, the editorial work, the management of the business affairs 
of the publication and the work of the editor. The paper has gained 
an enviable reputation for giving full and reliable accounts of all 
happenings of local interest, and of the more important events in the 
world without, and it has always promoted improvements in the com- 
munity. The paper has a large and representative circulation and 
this makes it valuable as an advertising medium for the local mer- 
chants. 

On the 11th of October, 1904, occurred the marriage of INIr. Breen 
and JNIiss Nora I. Hickey. She was born in Camp Grove, JNIarshall 
county, Illinois, and is a daughter of David and INIary (Day) Hickey, 
natives of Ireland. The father became the owner of valuable land in 
INIarshall county and gained a gratifying measure of success as a 



20 HISTOKY OF STARK COUXTY 

farmer. Mrs. Breen attended the cuuiitry schools and after com- 
pleting the com-se oiFered there became a student in the Academj' of 
Om" Lady of the Sacred Heart at Peoria, Illmois, from which she was 
graduated. 31r. and 3Irs. Breen have four children; Evelyn, Cathe- 
rine, Robert V., Jr., and ^Margaret. 

31r. Breen supports the republican party at the polls and gives 
careful studj' to the questions and issues before the people. Both he 
and his wife belong to St. John's Catholic church, and he is a member 
of the Knights of Columl)us and the Catholic Order of Foresters. 
He is well known not only in Bradford but throughout the county 
and holds the respect and the esteem of his fellow citizens. 



HON. CYRUS BOCOCK. 

One can hardh^ mention a phase of development of Stark county 
with Avhich Hon. Cyrus Bocock of Bradford has not been promi- 
nectly connected, and he is well known outside the limits of the 
county, for he served for two terms in the state legislature and was for 
eight years a member of the board of equalization. Xot only does he 
command the respect of all with whom he is associated because of his 
niarked abilitv, but he also has the facultv of niakino- and retaining 
friends and is probably the most popular man in the county. 

A native of Ohio, he was born in Highland county on the .5th of 
October, 18.32, of the marriage of Elijah and Barbara (]McKinney) 
Bocock, natives of Virginia and Pennsylvania, respectively. They 
were married in Ohio on the 18th of July, 1822, and remained in the 
Buckeye state until 1832, when they removed westward to Fulton 
county, Illinois. There the father jnu-chased timber land, which he 
cleared and placed under cultivation, devoting the remainder of his 
active life to agricultural pin-suits. He reached an advanced age, 
dying in 3Iarch, 188.5. on his eighty-seventh birthday. He was a quiet 
and unassuming man but possessed genuine worth. His wife died in 
1879 when eighty-one years old, in the faith of the Methodist Epis- 
copal chin-ch, of which she was a devoted and active member. Mr. 
and yirs. Bocock were the parents of seven children, all of whom are 
now deceased, save our subject. 

Cyrus Bocock passed his boyhood and youth under the parental 
roof and received a good education for those days. He attended the 
])ublic schools until about twenty years of age and he then became a 
student in a select school but was compelled to give up further study 



UNfVERSITY Of UimiS 

URBANA 



f 




ilKS. CYRUS BOCOCK 



'!#' 



r 








I YKUS BOCXJCK 



LIBRARY 
IVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
URBA.MA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 25 

ill less than a year on account of his health. Later he taught that 
school for six months and then, having received a teacher's license, 
went home and began teaching in the district schools. For fourteen 
years he followed that profession and also engaged in farming, as 
the school term lasted but six months during the winter. During this 
entire time he taught in three adjoining districts, one of which was 
his home district. This record indicates the excellence of his work 
and his popularity with his patrons. 

In 18.57 iNlr. Rocock came to Stark county, Illinois, and engaged 
in farming here for eighteen months, but as the crops were a failure 
he returned home and again turned his attention to teaching. In the 
spring of 1866 he became a resident of Camp Grove, Stark county, 
and purchased a small country store at that place. At that time the 
nearest railroad was thirteen miles away and the settlers did much of 
their buying at small crossroads stores such as ]Mr. Robock conducted 
for about four years. In 1869 he sold out his business and when the 
railroad was built through Castleton he was quick to recognize the 
value of that town as a trade center and built the first store there. He 
engaged in general merchandising at Castleton for fourteen years and 
also establislied the postoffice there. On selling out his mercantile 
interests he took up his residence upon his farm of two hundred and 
foi'ty acres in Penn township, which he had bought in the meantime 
and which he operated successfully for three years. He then removed 
to Rradford and engaged in the loan and collection business, in which 
field he was active for many years. In the management of his affairs 
he displayed unusual knowledge of local business conditions, a keen 
insight into human nature and a soundness of judgment that enabled 
him to succeed where others would have failed. lie Mas also uncom- 
promisingly honest in all of his transactions and no one has ever 
charged him with sharp practice or deception. For many years he 
was the only auctioiieer in this locality and cried the greater number 
of tile sales in his part of the county. Since 1010 he has confined his 
attention chiefly to such business as comes within the scope of a notary 
public, public administrator and conveyancer. He has served as 
public administrator of Stark county for about thirty years and has 
settled more estates than any other man within its borders. He has 
also drawn up many wills, leases, mortgages and other legal papers 
and is recognized as an expert in v.-ork of that character. 

JNIr. Rocock was one of the organizers and is still one of the large 
stockholders of the local electric light plant and also of the Empire 
Tele])hone Company, of which he is president and which operates 
through Stark, Rureau and Henrv counties. In addition to his ex- 



26 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

tensive interests in those concerns he owns eight hundred acres of fine 
land in South Dakota and two hundred and forty acres in Penn town- 
ship, this county. His advice is often sought on business matters, as 
his judgment is unusually reliable and as the greatest confidence is 
felt in his integrity. 

JNIr. Rocock was married on the 2d of April, 18.57, to 31iss Kleanor 
]SI. Fonts, who was born in Fulton county, Illinois. She grew to 
womanhood there and acquired her education in the public schools, 
and for some time was one of ]Mr. Bocock's pupils. They have become 
the parents of seven children, as follows: Charles W., ex-treasiu'er of 
Stark county, is residing in Toulon and a sketch of him appears else- 
where in this work. Francis M., a retired farmer living in AVyoming, 
this comity, married ^Nliss Annie INIahler. Robert Leonard, who was 
formerly a traveling man but is now a merchant of Los Angeles, Cali- 
fornia, married ]Miss Ella Christie. Enmia Luella is at home. Sarah 
Ada gave her hand in marriage to William JNIalone, a resident of this 
county. Cyrus Oscar passed away on the 12th of ]March, 1904. 
Clarence E. is now dean and professor of science at the Idaho Xormal 
University at Albion, Idaho, and has been connected with that insti- 
tution for eleven years. 

Mr. Rocock is a stanch republican and has for years been a leader 
in his party. He has served on the county and congressional central 
committees and has at all times done all in his jjower to secure the 
success of his party at the polls. He has held a number of offices, both 
local and state, and in all of his official capacities has discharged his 
duties with an eye single to the public ^velfare. While living in Ful- 
ton county he was county supervisor for five years and held a similar 
office in this county for many years. As before stated he has been 
public administrator for about thirty years and for some time he has 
been a member of the town board of Bradford. In 1872 he was elected 
to the state legislature and served one regular term and one adjourned 
term. In 1888 he was again chosen as a state official, being elected a 
member of the board of equalization, and in 1892 he was reelected, 
serving for eight years in that capacity. For the last six years of 
that time he was a member of the committee on corporations and 
among the powerful companies with which his committee was con- 
cerned was the Pullman Company. He is an exemplary member of 
the Masonic fraternity, being identified with Rradford Lodge. No. 
59.5, A. F. & A. jNI., of Avhich he had served as secretary for twenty- 
one years, when he resigned that office in 1914. He is also affiliated 
with the Knights Templar commandery at Princeton, Illinois, and the 
Eastern Star, and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fel- 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 27 

lows, ill which lodge he has filled all of the chairs. His life has been 
a long and honorable one filled with aeeoiiii)lishment along many lines 
of endeavor and, although he has reached an age when most men are 
no longer able to take a part in the world's work, he is still active 
ill business and is vigorous in both mind and body. He has gained 
financial independence solely through his own efforts, as he began his 
career without capital and without the aid of infiuential friends, and 
has at all times depended entirely upon his own resources. Although 
he values highly material prosjjerity, he has never made the attain- 
ment of Mealtli his chief aim in life. On the other hand he has at ail 
times adhered to the highest standards of probity and has given of his 
time, thought and means to the advancement of his town and county 
and has been willing to aid those less fortunate than himself. He is 
respected for his ability and loved for his generosity and kindness. 



JAMES HARTLEY 



James Hartley was an efficient and prosperous farmer of Essex 
township and at the time of his death owned three hundred and twelve 
acres there. His birth occurred in Lancashire, l^ngland, in 1837, and 
his parents were Edmund and INLary (INIorris) Hartley, who in 18.51 
emigrated to America. Xot long after arriving here they took up 
their residence at Trivoli, Illinois, where the father worked by the 
month until 1854. In that year he came with his family to Stark 
county and in partnership with a INIr. Ingram purchased one hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Essex township. He at once began the 
improvement of the place and as he managed his affairs well and 
practiced economy his resources steadily increased. He invested in 
more land and accumulated three hundred and twelve acres, all of 
whicli arc under cultivation. He continued to follow agricultuial 
pursuits until his demise, which occurred in 1871- 

Mr. Hartley was married in Toulon to INIiss Ann JMiller, who was 
born in England in 1837, a daughter of Joseph and Mary (Holland) 
JMiller. Her father came to America in 184() and settled in Pennsyl- 
vania, where he remained until 18.52, when he removed to Peoria, 
Illinois, whence he subsequently came to Wyoming. Her mother 
passed away in England. INIr. and Mrs. Hartley became the par- 
ents of seven children, two of wdiom died in childhood, the others be- 
ing: Edwin, a retired farmer of Wyoming, a sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work ; JNIary, the widow of John Duckworth, of Wy- 



28 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

oming; William, who resides upon the home farm in Essex township; 
Clara, now JNIrs. Tom Taylor, of Lineoln; and Joseph, who is operat- 
ing the homestead in partnership with his brother William. 

Mr. Hartley supported the republican party and took the interest 
of a good citizen in public affairs although he never sought office. He 
discharged to the full all the obligations resting upon him, and his 
integrity, his industry and his ability gained him a high place in the 
respect of his fellow citizens. 

Following her husband's death ]Mrs. Hartley remained upon the 
homestead supervising its operation. She not only proved capable 
in the management of the farm but she also added to the place until 
it embraced over five hundred acres. She was one of the best business 
women in the county and also possessed in a high measure lovable 
womanly qualities which endeared her to those who were closely asso- 
ciated with her. She passed away upon the home farm on the 2181 
of June, 1915. 



ORAX L. HATCH. 



An excellent farm of two hundred and sixty-two acres is regarded 
as one of the best improved farm properties of Elmira township, 
and to Oran L. Hatch, the owner, pays a substantial tribute in recog- 
nition of the care and labor which he continually bestows upon the 
fields. He was born December 27, 1809, upon this farm, a son of 
John ]M. Hatch, and a grandson of ISIoses and Jane (Gates) Hatch, 
who were natives of oMaine and Vermont, respectively. The former 
was a man of prominence in his home locality, where he was fre- 
quently called to positions of honor and trust. He devoted his life 
to farming, owning two hundred and fifty acres of rich and pro- 
ductive land. He passed away April 18, 18.58, at the age of sixty- 
four years, and his wife died at the age of thirty-four years. Their 
family numbered six children : Jane, who became the wife of A. L. 
Clark and died in January, 1848; ]Martha, the wife of Samuel Page, 
who died in 18ol; Eliza, who died at the age of eighteen months; 
John 31.; Horace, who died in 31arch. 1883; Eliza, who became the 
wife of S. D. Lisle, of Xeponset, Illinois, and died about four 
years ago. 

John :M. Hatch Avas born at Groton, Vermont. ^larch 10. 1827. 
and after acquiring a common school education worked in a sawmill 
and in a brickyard for a time. He afterward learned the carpenter's 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 29 

trade and for one year lie cultivated his father's farm, but in 1851 
removed from New England to the middle west, settling on section 
6, Elmira townshiji, Stark county, Illinois. He acquired five hun- 
dred and fifty acres of land lying in Stark and Henry counties. 
While he carried on farming, he also engaged extensively in raising 
hogs. In February, 189.5, he removed to Kewanee, Illinois, A\iiere 
he erected a fine residence, there spending his remaining days in the 
enjoyment of well earned rest, his death occurring January 20, 1906. 
He became one of the organizers and stockholders of the Bank of 
Kewanee but was not active in the management of the business. On 
the '24.th of February, 1853, he married Miss Roxanna I.isle. who 
was born in Vermont, a daughter of William and Atlanta (Darling) 
Lisle, who traveled by wagon from the Green JNIountain state to 
Illinois in 1835, and settled in Elmira township, Stark county. Her 
father secured a tract of raw land on which not a furrow had been 
turned nor an improvement made and at once began the development 
of a farm, being closely associated with the progress of the county 
in pioneer times. He died October 5, 1858, while his wife passed 
away April 12, 1885, at the age of seventy-seven years. She was 
long a consistent and devoted member of the Congregational church. 
By her marriage she became the mother of fifteen children: Eliza- 
beth, who married William G. Perkins and is now deceased ; Thomas, 
who died in infancy; Thomas, the second of the name, who died at 
Pike's Peak, Colorado, in 1859; Stephen D., a resident of Neponset, 
Illinois; Airs. Hatch; Walter, a farmer of Dakota, Nebraska; 
Janette, twin sister of Walter and the wife of John L. Price, of 
Republic county, Kansas; Julia, the deceased wife of Silas Patten; 
Lydia, who has passed away; George W., who enlisted in 1804 in 
res])onse to a call for one hundred day men to defend the Union and 
died in the service when but twenty years of age ; Franklin, deceased ; 
Norris, a farmer; Emeline, the wife of William Berry; Lucinda, the 
wife of David INIofRtt, of Reno, Nevada; and Rufus D., living in 
Neponset, Illinois. Of this family, as previously stated, Roxanna 
became the wife of John ]M. Hatch. She still survives her husband 
and now makes her home with her daughter, INIrs. Charles N. Good. 
By her marriage she had a family of six children : Horace, who died 
at the age of thirteen months; Burton, who died at the age of fifteen 
months; Clara E., the Avife of Charles N. Good of Elmira township; 
Cora, the wife of Albert Earley, of Kewanee township; ]Martha J., 
Avho died at the age of eleven years ; and Oran L. 

The last named pursued his education in the common schools 
near the home place and upon the retirement of his father took 



30 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

charge of the farm, on which he has remained continuously since with 
tlie exception of two years wliich he spent in Deadwoo<l, South 
Dakota, there looking after his interests in a copper mine. He 
returned to the farm, however, in 1908, and is now busily engaged 
in the cultivation of U\o hundred and sixty-two acres of rich and 
j)roductive land. He has put all of the improvements upon the place 
save the house and has one of the three best improved farms of the 
township. He has ever been progressive in his metliods and has 
done whatever he has undertaken in a most efficient manner, follow- 
ing thoroughly modern jjrocesses of farming. For a number of 
years he has been at the head of the Kewanee Farmers Institute 
and he is now vice president and one of the directors of the C. B. 
Hurst Silo Company, which he aided in organizing. This company 
is engaged in the manufacture of a sjjecial wet mix silo. In years 
gone by ]Mr. Hatch has also devoted some attention to bee culture 
and is considered an authority on that subject. He has installed on 
his farm a rejjair shop, which is probably one of the best equipped of 
any farm shop in the state, and in fact would be a credit to a town or 
city. In recognition of this the Prairie State Farmer sent a repre- 
sentative from Chicago to obtain ]Mr. Hatch's views upon the subject 
of following such a plan. The shop was equipped at a cost of nearly 
one thousand dollars, and jNIr. Hatch has become quite expert along 
mechanical lines. Here he has done much work of value in connection 
with the farm, including the building of a tractor, which he uses in 
the heavy work, not only in the fields and on the road but in building 
work as well. His ability is not confined to iron work and machinery 
alone, as he is an artistic woodworker and ^\ lien he built the barns 
upon his place he drew the plans himself and the bill for lumber was 
made to tally with his own figures. In a word he is a very resourceful 
man, ready to do anything necessary in connection with developing 
and imjjroving his farm. INIr. Hatch also has other business connec- 
tions, for he was one of six men who organized the Farmers Elevator 
Company of Kewanee. and they have the material on the ground for 
the erection of a large elevator there. 

On the 3d of September, 1894, Mr. Hatch was married to ]Mrs. 
jNIinnie E. (Berry) Higgins, the widow of James Higgins. By her 
former marriage she had one child, Nevada, and by her present mar- 
riage had two children. Bertha and John, but the latter died when a 
year old. The former is the wife of C. E. Recce and lives on the 
home place. 

In polities Mr. Hatch maintains an independent attitude, consid- 
ering the capability of the candidate rather than his party affiliation. 



HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 31 

He has never been ambitious to hold pohtical office but has served as 
patimiaster and as scliool director. He hohls membership with the 
Red yien, the ^Modern \\\)odmen of America and the Royal Arca- 
num of Kewanee, and he is also a member of the Kewanee Civic Club. 
In a word, he stands at all times for progress and improvement along 
those lines which work for the benefit of the individual and of the 
community. His efforts may well serve as a source of inspiration 
and encouragement to others, showing what may be accomplished, 
for he is justly accountetl one of the leading agriculturists and busi- 
ness men of Elmira township and this section of the state. 



W. N. XELSOX. 



W. y. X'elson is a prominent business man of La Fayette, serv- 
ing as cashier of the State Bank there. The spirit of progress actu- 
ated him at every point in his career and laudable ambition has 
prompted him to reach the position which he now occupies. He is 
numbered among Iowa's native sons, his birth having occurred at 
Belle Plaine, that state, Xovember 27, 1873. His father, Tury 
X^elson, was a native of Sweden, born in 1846, and in that country 
was reared to the age of nineteen years, after which, in 186.5. he 
crossed the briny deep to the new world and made his way direct to 
Illinois, having friends in Henry county. For a few years he worked 
by the month as a farm hand in Henry and Stark counties, and in 
Goshen township of the latter county he was united in marriage to 
Miss ]Mary Larson, also a native of Sweden. Soon after their mar- 
riage they removed to Iowa, establishing their home upon a farm 
near Belle Plaine, where the father carried on general agricultural 
pursuits for about four years. He then sold his property there and 
returned to Illinois, settling in Goshen township. Stark county, upon 
land which his wife had inherited. He afterward purchased other 
land and for a long period was numbered among the active, indus- 
trious and successful farmers of his district. Upon the homestead 
place he and his wife reared their family of eight children. The 
husband and father died February 5, 191.5, and the mother is now 
making her home with her children. 

W. X^. X^elson was reared on the old homestead farm in this 
county and is indebted to the public school system for the early edu- 
cational privileges which he enjoyed. He was qualified for business 
life bv a course in a commercial college at Dixon, Illinois, after 



32 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

which he made his initial step in the business world as a clerk in a 
hardware store in Galva. A year later he went to Kewanee where he 
was employed by the Tube Works Company. After doing manual 
labor in the works for a time he was transferred to a position in the 
office, where he acted as timekeeper until promoted to the position 
of assistant chief. His identification with that company covered fif- 
teen years, a fact indicative of his capability and trustworthiness. 

On the 27th of November, 1901, jNlr. Nelson was united in mar- 
riage to INIiss Lizzie Parish, of Toulon, a daughter of Pethuel 
Parish, mentioned elsewhere in this work. ]Mrs. Nelson was born 
in Stark county and was a schoolmate of her husband in their child- 
hood days. Their earl)' friendship ripened into love and was con- 
simimated in a marriage that has been blessed with three children, 
Roland, Gilbert and ]Mary Elizabeth. 

]Mr. Nelson resigned his position in the Tube Works at Kewanee 
to come to La Fayette as cashier of the State Bank, of which he took 
charge in INIarch, 1915, and removed his family to La Fayette. His 
business training and keen insight well qualify him for the duties 
which now devolve upon him, and he is found to be a courteous and 
obliging bank official, always attending to the business of the insti- 
tution and Avatchful of the interests of depositors. Fraternally he 
is connected with the Modern Woodmen, and he and his wife are 
consistent members of the La Fayette JNIethodist Episcopal church. 
They are held in high regard in this community and wherever they 
are known, because they possess those sterling traits of character 
which in every land and clime awaken confidence and resjiect. 



HARMON PHENIX. 



Harmon Phenix is still active in financial circles as president of 
the Phenix Banking Company of Bradford, although he has reached 
the advanced age of eighty-two years, and his business ability and 
acumen are recognized by all. He has resided in Bradford for many 
3'ears and has worked his way steadily upward from comparative 
jioverty to financial independence. 

Mr. Phenix was born in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, on the 
20th of January, 1834, of the marriage of John and Lydia A. 
(Daniels) Phenix. John Phenix was a native of New York, as 
were his parents, Mr. and INIrs. Stephen Phenix, but his grandfather 
was born in the north of Ireland, whence in company Avith a lirother 



LfSRARY 

UNivERsiry OF umois 

URBANA 




HARMON PHEXIX 







MRS. HARMON PHENIX 



l'BR/\RY 

t^WVERsiry OF iiumis 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 35 

he emigrated to New York city. He, his son Stephen and grandson 
John Phenix were all weavers hy trade and expert artisans. John 
Phenix went to Lnzerne county, Pennsylvania, in early nianliood 
and there turned his attention to carpentering, hut following his 
removal to Stark county, Illinois, in 1834, which was then a part of 
Putnam county, he entered eighty acres of land in Penn township 
and concentrated his energies upon the operation of his farm. Two 
years later his wife and children joined him, going by boat to Peoria, 
the voyage requiring seven weeks. At that time Peoria was but a 
small town and this entire section of Illinois was a pioneer district. 
The family lived in a log house for some time but later a more com- 
fortable residence was erected, and at length JNIr. Phenix built a 
third home, which was commodious and convenient. He at length 
turned the operation of his farm over to his son Abram and devoted 
his time and attention to the carpenter's trade initil he was compelled 
to i-etire because of physical disability. He died at the age of seventy- 
two years. He was an adherent of the democratic party and served 
accejitably as a member of the school board. His religious faith was 
that of the ^Methodist Episcopal church. His wife, who bore the 
maiden name of Lydia A. Daniels, was born in Luzerne county, 
Pennsylvania, where she was reared and educated. At the time of 
liei- marriage she was engaged in teaching school. She reached the 
venerable age of ninety-one years and passed away in Osceola town- 
shi]) in the faith of the ^Methodist Episcopal church. She was the 
mother of six children, namely: Daniel B., a sketch of whom appears 
elsewhere in this work; Elizabeth, who married Samuel Sturm and 
died at the age of eighty-four years; Nancy, who became the Avife 
of Solomon Geer and was seventy-five years old at the time of hei- 
death; Abram, Avho is living retired in Bradford and a sketch of A\hom 
appears elsewhere in this Avork; jNIary C, who married Hiram 
Drawyer and died when about eighty years of age;. and Harmon. 

The last named was brought to this country when but an infant 
and ])assed the days of his boyhood and youth upon the home farm. 
He early assisted in the work of cultivating the fields and caring for 
the stock, and thus not only learned much concerning agricultural 
work, but was also trained in habits of industry. He attended a sub- 
scription school, as that was before the days of pul)lic schools, and 
remembers well the crude equipment of the schoolhouse. The seats 
were slabs resting on pegs driven into the wall, the building itself 
was of logs and the curriculum was very limited. When about nine- 
teen years of age he began working at the carpenter's trade, wliicli 
lie follf)wed for three or four years, and during that time he carefully 



36 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

saved his money, as he had determined to continue his education. 
He became a student in an academy at Pawpaw, lUinois, and after 
attending there for three terms passed an examination covering the 
work coni2)leted in that time. For three years he engaged in clerking 
in a store at Pleasant Green and at the end of that time bought out 
the business, which he continued until 1869. He then removed his 
stock of merchandise to Bradford, establishing a general store there 
in partnership with his cousin, Charles W. Phenix. In ISJi he sold 
his interest to his partner and engaged in the hardware and imple- 
ment business until 1881, when he sold out to Deyo Brothers and 
again became associated in business with Charles W. Phenix, estab- 
lishing a bank. This partnership was maintained until 1888. when 
INIr. Phenix of this review became sole owner of the business, which 
he conducted alone until 189.5. In that year he admitted his son, 
Daniel J., his nephew, Bardwell D. Phenix, and his brother, Daniel 
B. Phenix, to a partnership, forming the Phenix Banking Company, 
■of which he is president; D. B. Phenix, vice president; D. J. Phenix, 
cashier; and B. D. Phenix. assistant cashier. This company has 
gained an enviable prestige throughout tlie county which is well 
deserved, as its jjolicy has conformed to high commercial standards 
and its business has at all times been based upon sound principles. 
The company owns a great deal of valuable land in Illinois, Iowa, 
Minnesota, Mississippi, Kansas, Texas, and Missouri, and its aft'airs 
are in a most satisfactory condition. Our subject still owns person- 
ally about two hundred and forty acres in this county. He had no 
unusual advantages in his youth, but he possessed great energy and 
determination, and these qualities, together with his good judgment 
and keen insight, have been the most important factors in his success. 

On the 7th of ]March, 1864, ]Mr. Phenix Avas united in marriage 
to ]Miss Emma L. Libby, Avho was born and reared in Canada. She 
passed away on the -Ith of October, 1912, in the faith of the First 
Baptist chin"ch, leaving five children to mourn her loss: Oscar H., at 
home; Lillian C, who is the widow of Edwin Plummer and resides 
with lier father: Xancy, the wife of Otto C. Boyd, of Bradford; 
Daniel J., who is associated with his father in business; and Elbert 
H., who is conducting a bakery and confectionery store. 

Many representatives of the Phenix family have been actively 
identified with the teacher's profession, including our subject and his 
mother, Lydia A. Phenix, who taught school for some time. His 
wife, Mrs. Emma (Libby) Phenix. was also a teacher and two of 
their children, IJllian C. and Daniel J., taught in the public schools. 
Two of his grandchildren are preparing for college teachers, these 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 37 

being R. lionita Plumiiier, who is a third-year student at Knox 
College, Galesbm'g, and Emily Pluninier, who is a senior student 
in the Bradford high school. 

iNIr. Phenix gives his political allegiance to the democratic party 
and for many years was a member of the village board and school 
board, his long retention in those offices proving the acceptability of 
his services. He also held other offices in the township. He belongs 
to the JNlethodist Episcopal church and the i)rinciples which govern 
his life are found in the teachings of that organization and in the 
tenets of the jNIasonic fraternity. He was made a jNlason in Toulon 
Lodge, No. 95, A. F. & A. M., in 1862, and became a charter mem- 
ber of Bradford Lodge, No. 514, A. F. & A. ]M., of which he Avas 
the first junior warden and of which he served as master for many 
years. He was formerly also identified with the Wyoming chapter, 
R. A. jNL, but has demitted on account of his age. He is now eighty- 
two years old but he is still quite active, still looks after his business 
interests, and in mind and body is as vigorous as most men of seventj'. 
He has not only gained a considerable measure of wealth but he has 
also won and retained the sincere respect and warm regard of those 
who have been associated with him. 



W. R. LIGGETT. 



W. R. Liggett resides on section 20, Osceola township, where he 
has an excellent farm property of one hundred and seventy acres 
which yields well deserved tribute to the care and labor which he 
bestows upon the place. He was born on the 3d of February, 1853, 
in Warren county, Ohio, a son of William and Anne (]Medaris) Lig- 
gett, who were natives of IMaine and Ohio, respectively. They came 
to Illinois in 185-t, traveling across the country with team and wagon, 
after which ]Mr. Liggett seciu-ed what is now known as the old home- 
stead farm and thereon resided until his death, which occurred in 1875. 
His entire life had been devoted to general agricultural pin-suits. His 
widow long siu'vived him, and when death called her in 1904 her re- 
mains were laid to rest in the Osceola Grove cemeteiy. 

When a little lad of about six years W. R. Liggett became a jnipil 
in the district school near his father's home. Through the summer 
months he worked in the fields and early received ])ractical training 
in the best methods of tilling the soil and developing the crops. After 
his father's death he purchased the old homestead and has converted it 



38 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

into a very valual)le farm property, making all of the improvements 
thereon save erecting the house ami one barn. He owns one hundred 
ami seventy acres of rich and valuable land which annually responds 
to his care and cultivation in golden harvests. It is pleasanty situated 
not far from Bradford and is an excellent j^roperty that in its well 
improved appearance indicates the practical and jjrogressive methods 
of the owner. 

In 1889 Mr. Liggett was united in marriage to Miss Emma Jane 
Stephens and they have become the parents of three children: Charles, 
who is engaged in farming with his father; Iva, now the wife of Har- 
old Pettigrew; and Alma M., at home. 

In i)olitics ]Mr. Liggett has always been a democrat since age con- 
fei-red upon him the right of franchise. He and his wife attend the 
local church and they are interested in all those forces which work for 
the benefit and improvement of the community. ]Mr. Liggett has 
always lived in this county since his arrival here sixty-one years ago, 
when he was a babe of but two years. He has witnessed many changes 
in the intervening period as the work of progress and improvement 
has been carried steadily forward. He has borne his part in the task 
of i^romoting the agricultural development of the county and he has 
been quick to adopt all new measures and methods which make the 
labors of the agriculturist of greater avail in the attainment of success. 



ERNEST H. LLOYD. 

AVell known among the business men of Toulon and Stark county 
is Ernest H. Lloyd, the manager and cashier of the State Bank, 
which position he has occupied for twelve years. He is regarded as 
one of the best informed men of the county on banking matters and 
liroad experience and progressiveness have brought him to the front 
in this connection. He was born in Toulon. ]May 13. 18(57. and 
comes of Welsh ancestry. His paternal grandfather. Stephen 
Lloyd, Sr., was a native of South Wales and became an early settler 
of Pennsylvania. It was at Ebensbin-g, Pennsylvania, that his son 
and namesake, Stephen Lloyd, Jr., was born and reared. Having 
arrived at years of maturity, he was married in that state to ]Miss 
Phoebe Lloyd, a daughter of S. Lloyd, also a native of Wales. The 
parents of om* subject came west to Illinois in 1863, settling in 
Toulon, where the father engaged in the grain and lumber business, 
becoming recognized as one of the enterprising, alert and progressive 



HISTOHY OF STARK COUNTY 39 

merchants of the city. Here he reared his family, remaining in 
Toulon until 1882, when he disposed of his buiness here and removed 
to Pawnee county, Nebraska. He had previously pinchased and 
was the owner of a large body of iminiproved land there. He spent 
his last years in that state, passing away in IJurchard, Nebraska, in 
189.5, while his widow survived until 1912. Their family numbered 
five sons and a daughter: Catherine, the wife of J. C. Dort, of 
Pawnee City, Nebraska; W. T., who is a jeweler of Washington, 
Kansas; D. J., a business man of Los Angeles, California; Ernest 
H., of this review; John, a commercial traveler living in Kansas City; 
and Fred, a farmer and stock raiser of Colorado. 

Ernest H. Lloyd spent his early youth in Toulon and afterward 
accompanied his parents on their removal to Nebraska, where he 
continued his education in the high school. When a young man of 
eighteen years he entered a bank at Burchard, Nebraska, and worked 
his way upward in that institution until he became stockholder and 
cashier. He was connected Avith the bank for seventeen years, at the 
end of which time he sold his interest and returned to Toulon. This 
city had ever had a A\arm place in his heart and it seemed like com- 
ing home to him. He purchased an interest in the State Bank and 
became cashier and manager of the institution. He is now concen- 
trating his attention upon constructive effort and bending his ener- 
gies to administrative direction and executive control. The l)ank 
has an extensive business for a town of this size, and is regarded as 
one of the thoroughly safe financial institutions of this part of the 
state. The jjolicy Avhich is maintained under the direction of INIr. 
Lloyd is one which will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny 
and brings to the institution merited success and gratifying growth. 

In Burchard, Nebraska, on the 30th of December, 1893, Mr. 
Lloyd was married to INIiss Ada W. Walker, who was born in Toulon 
and reared in this city, being a daughter of John Walker, who was 
one of the well-known residents of Stark county up to the time of 
his death. In the family are three sons : Harry W., who is a grad- 
uate of the Toulon high school; Ernest W., a high school pupil; 
and Walker S., a lad of five years. 

Politically Mr. Lloyd is a republican, and fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Odd Fellows lodge of Toulon, while his wife is 
identified with the Rebekah degree. INIrs. Lloyd is a member of the 
Congregational church of Toulon, and he is a generous contributor to 
its sun])ort and ecjually liberal in his assistance to benevolent projects. 
The family occupy a pleasant residence which is justly celebrated for 
its warm-hearted hospitality, and Mr. IJoyd has made for himself 



40 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

a most creditable position in business circles. His life lias been 
passed in the routine of business and there have been no spectacular 
phases in his career, but faithful performance of duty and loyalty to 
every trust have brought him to a creditable place in business circles. 



P. W. Mc:\IAXUS. 



p. W. jNIciManus is a senior partner in the firm of ^McManus 
& Swearingen, jn-oprietors of a general store at Bradford. He has 
long been connected with this business, and capable management, 
enterprise and initiative are bringing to him ^\e\\ deserved success. 
He was born in ^Marshall. Illinois, November 8, ISCi, a non of Peter 
and jMary (Lynch) JMcjNIanus. The father was born in County 
Fermanagh, Ireland, and the mother in Comity Clare, that country, 
but in early life they came to the new world and were married in 
Fulton county, Illinois. It was in 1851 that Peter JMc^Ianus crossed 
the Atlantic and settled in Peoria county, Illinois, where he carried 
on farming. Afterward he removed to jNIarshall county, devoting 
his remaining days to general agricultural pursuits until his life's 
labors were ended in death in 1879. His widow long survived him 
and passed away in 1914. 

P. AV. ^Ic^NIanus was a lad of fifteen years at the time of his 
father's death. He jiursued his education in the schools of his native 
county, completing his studies in the old brick seminary near Henry. 
He was reared to farm life, early becoming familiar with the best 
methods of tilling the soil and caring for the crops, and he remained 
upon the farm imtil thirty-two years of age, when, hoping to find 
commercial pursuits more congenial, he removed to Bradford and 
bought out the business of Mr. Pilgrim, who was a partner of AV. A. 
Washburn. He then became a partner of the latter and their rela- 
tionship was maintained until the death of Mr. AVashburn. Mr. 
JNIc^Ianus then remained alone in business for three years, at the end 
of which time he admitted H. A. Swearingen to a partnership in 
the ownership and conduct of a general store which is one of the lead- 
ing mercantile establishments of the town. They occupy two floors 
and basement of a building forty by one hundred and twenty feet, 
having a millinery department on the second floor. Their trade is 
large and is constantly growing, for they carry a large stock and ]Mit 
forth every effort to meet the wants of their customers. In addition 
to their mercantile interests in Bradford thev own three hundred 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 41 

and twenty acres of land in Nelson county, North Dakota, and ^Ir. 
iNlcJManus also has eightj^ acres of land in Stark county. He has 
likewise been active in looking after estates and has in his control 
one of the largest of the county. 

In 1890 ]Mr. ]Mc]Manus was united in marriage to Miss Nora 
jNI. Hickey, and they became the parents of four children: James 
P., who resides in Illinois; and ]\Iargaret, William and ]Mary, all at 
home. The wife and mother passed away in 1906, in the faith of 
the Catholic church, and in 1911 ^Ir. JMciSIanus married JNIiss Julia 
Driscoll. 

In religious faith he is a Catholic and he is likewise connected 
with the ^Modern Woodmen of America, the Fraternal Reserves, 
the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Order of Foresters. In 
politics he is a democrat and has been called to some local offices, 
serving as mayor of the city for one term and as a member of the 
city council for ten years, ever exercising his official prerogatives 
in support of plans and measures for the general good. He has 
made an excellent record both as a business man and citizen and at 
all times is characterized by the spirit of enterprise which accom- 
plishes results. 



WILLIAM COMBS BOCOCK. 

AVilliam Combs Bocock has resided in Stark county during prac- 
tically his entire life and as he is prominently identified with busi- 
ness interests as a stockman, he has a wide acquaintanceship not only 
in Wyoming, where he makes his home, but also throughout tlie 
entire county. He is now living retired, enjoying a Avell deserved 
period of leisure. 

]\Ir. Bocock was born in Fulton county, Illinois, May 4, 18.54, 
a son of Robert JNIcBocock. The family removed to this county 
M'hen our subject was a year old and he was reared upon the home 
farm in Penn township and attended the country schools in the ac- 
quirement of an education. For two years he rented land from his 
father, but at the end of that time purchased eighty acres, on which 
he resided until 1890, w^hen he came to Wyoming and turned his 
attention to the buying and shipping of stock. He engaged in tliat 
business until 1914, when he retired from active life. He was an 
excellent judge of stock, watched the markets carefully and deri^'ed 
a good profit from his transactions. He owns two hundred and 



42 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

twenty acres of land in Bureau county and was for ten years presi- 
dent of the National Bank of Wyoming. He also holds title to his 
comfortable residence in AVyoming and is quite well-to-do. 

31r. Bocock was married in January, 1879, to ]\Iiss 31aria A. 
Holmes, who was also born in Fulton county, and they have a daugh- 
ter, jNlina A., now the wife of Phil Lucius, of Galesburg, Illinois, 
and the mother of a daughter, ]Margaret. 

^Ir. Bocock believes in the policies of the republican party and 
loyally supports its candidates at the j^olls, although he has never 
desired official preferment. He has always taken a keen interest 
in the general welfare and is recognized as a public-spirited citizen 
as well as a man of sovmd judgment, good business ability and sterling 
integrity. His friends are many and all who have come in contact 
with him respect him highly. 



A. U. TL RN]}LLL. 



A. D. Turnbull is a rejiresentative of one of the old pioneer fami- 
lies of Stark county and is now engaged in general farming on sec- 
tion 19, Elmira toAvnship. He was born in that township on the 17th 
of January, 1858, his parents being Robert and Elizabeth (Jackson) 
Turnbull. who were natives of Roxburyshire, Scotland, where the 
days of their childhood were passed and their marriage was celebrated. 
In 184'9 they left that country for the United States as passengers on 
a sailing vessel which was six weeks in reaching the American coast. 
They proceeded by way of the Great Lakes and the river route to 
La Salle, or Peru, Illinois, and thence drove across the country witli 
ox teams to Stark countv. After livina: here for a time the fatlier 
purchased a farm in Bureau comity and there jiassed away forty- 
five j'ears ago. His widow long survived him, her death occurring 
in July. 1905. 

A. D. Turnl)ull, spending his youthful days under the parental 
roof, is indebted to the district school system of Illinois for the edu- 
cational opportunities which he enjoyed. He early became familiar 
with all of the tasks wliich devolve upon the farm bred boy and as 
the years passed on he acquainted himself with the best methods of 
tilling the soil and caring for the crops. About thii'ty years ago he 
purchased his present home place on section 19, Elmira township — a 
tract of one hundred and sixty acres — on which he has placed many 
modern improvements, making his one of tlie valuable and attractive 




A. I). TLRXIULL 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 45 

farms of that part of tlie county. For a considerable period he en- 
gaged extensively in feeding cattle but is now engaged only in feeding 
hog's, which branch of his business adds not a little to his income. 

In 1885 JNIr. TurnbuU was united in marriage to JNIiss JNIargaret 
JNIcClennan and they have three children: Abby S., the wife of Ray- 
mond Spencer, a son of I. JNl. Spencer of Osceola, Illinois; JNlartha E., 
tlie wife of J. R. Winslow, a resident farmer of Toulon township; and 
Harvey L., who died in 1913. The wife and mother passed away in 
190.5, and in 1913 ]Mr. Turnbidl wedded ]Mrs. Cora Johnson. 

They attend the Presbyterian church, and JNlr. Turnbull is a mem- 
ber of the JNIodern Woodmen camp at Elmira. His political indorse- 
ment is given thi-ough his ballot to the principles of the republican 
jjarty. but he has never been a politician in the sense of office seeking. 
For six years he has been school trustee and is still the incumbent in 
that position. For more than a half century he has been a witness of 
the changes which have occurred in this section of the state as the 
work of development and improvement has been carried forward, and 
throughout his entire life he has been closely and helpfully associated 
with its agricultiu'al interests and progress. 



ROBERT J. HUNTER. 

Robert J. Hunter is a native son of Elmira township and lives 
on section 23. He was born May 29, 1871, his parents being Robert 
and Isabella (I^owrey) Hunter, who were natives of Ireland and 
came to America in 18.50. In this country they became acquainted 
and were married in Philadelphia, December 18, 1864. In 1867 
they came to Stark county, Illinois, settling upon the Davis farm 
in Elmira township. Later a removal was made to a farm near the 
Armstrong place, where they continued for seven years, and on the 
ex])iration of that period jNIr. Hunter purchased the farm upon 
which his sons, Robert and George, now reside. He bent his ener- 
gies to the development and improvement of that place up to the 
time of his demise and was numbered among the representative agri- 
culturists of the district. He was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, 
in 1836, and from 1867 until his demise was a resident of Elmira 
to\Miship, this county. He was an earnest Christian, guiding his life 
])v high religious principles, and when he passed away his funeral 
services were conducted by the Rev. W. H. Foulks, of the Presby- 
terian church, assisted by W. J. Drew. His widow is now living on 



46 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

a farm adjoining that of lier son Robert. In the family were six 
children: Mrs. ]Mary J. Screeton, now deceased; ]Mrs. Letitis 
DunlajJ, living in Toulon, Illinois; Robert J.; George L., who resides 
with his mother; Elizabeth, and Isabella jM., both deceased. 

At the usual age Robert J. Hunter entered the district schools 
and when not busy with his textbooks, assisted in the work of the 
home farm. At the time of his marriage he began operating a part 
of the old home farm independently and he is now conducting the 
farm in connection with his brother George. The place consists of 
two hundred and forty-five acres, on which are two residences, in 
which the brothers live. Robert J. Hunter leads a busy life, and the 
result of his industry and perseverance is manifest in the success 
which is attending his efforts. 

In 1890 he was united in marriage to ]Miss Carrie Osborn. who 
was born in Minnesota and came to Stark county with her parents 
when but four years of age. JNIr. and Mrs. Hunter are members of 
the Presbyterian church of Elmira. In politics he is a republican 
but not an office seeker. At one time he belonged to the ^Modern 
Woodmen of America, and is interested in the educational develop- 
ment of his community, as is shown by his service as school director. 
His entire life has been passed in the township in which he still makes 
his home, and that he possesses many sterling traits of character is 
recognized by those who have been his associates throughout the 
entire period. 



THOMAS HOADLEY. 

Among Stark county's well known business men is Thomas 
Hoadley, who is engaged in the grain and lumber trade at La Fay- 
ette. He has been connected with this line of business activity for 
a longer period than any other grain merchant of Stark county, 
for he began dealing in grain thirty-seven years ago and for twenty- 
seven years has been thus engaged in the county in which he now 
makes his home. He is honored and respected by all. not alone by 
reason of the success he has achieved but also owing to the straight- 
forward business policy which he has ever followed, his course meas- 
in-ing up to the highest commercial standards. 

Mr. Hoadley is a native of Xew York, his birth having occui-red 
at Tuckahoe. Westchester county, December 27. 18.J4.. His father. 
Richard Hoadley, was a native of the same county and was a son of 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 47 

Thnnias Hoadley, a native of England, who was there reared and 
learned the blacksmith's trade. After working at the forge for a 
few years in England he determined to try his fortune in the new 
world and crossed the Atlantic to the United States, settling at 
^Vhite Plains, Xew York. There he largely devoted his time and 
energies to the business of tool making. His son, Richard Hoadley, 
Avas reared in the Empire state, where he learned the trades of black- 
smithing .and tool making, devoting a number of years to that kind 
of \v()rk. Before leaving New York he was married to Miss Hannah 
Mort. a native of New York aTul of English lineage. They after- 
ward removed westward to Ohio and for a year jNIr. Hoadley worked 
at his trade in Cleveland, after which he came to Illinois, settling at 
Long Ridge, Stark county, about 1850. There he built a shop and 
cai-ried on business. He was a natural mechanic, possessing marked 
ingenuity along mechanical lines, and for some years he successfully 
continued in business at Long Ridge, but later disposed of his inter- 
ests there and ]-emo\ ed to Sparland, where he again engaged in busi- 
ness in the line of his trade. He was afterward employed in a shop 
in Toulon and then opened an establishment for the manufacture 
of carriages and buggies, in addition to which lie maintained a black- 
smith shop. He did very fine work as a carriage and buggy buildei- 
and his exhibits at state fairs won various premiums. He never 
lowered the standard of workmanship, whidi was of superior quality 
and finish. He carried on business at Toulon for a number of years 
and became widely known, the products of his factory finding favor 
among- those Avho cared for the best that is to be obtained. While 
living in Sparland he lost his first wife and later lie married again. 
He is now living retired in Toulon, where he has a circle of friends 
almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintance. 

Thomas Hoadley was reared in Toulon and at the usual age be- 
came a public school pupil. When his textbooks were put aside he 
f)btained a clerkship in a store at Duncan and later had charge of 
the business, which was owned by A. J. Scott, whom he represented 
as manager for some time. Subsequently, however, he turned his 
attention to the grain trade, taking charge of an elevator. He Mas 
next sent to Nebraska and was connected with ]Mr. Brockway at 
Bnrcliard, Pawnee county, where for more than a year he bought 
and sliipped grain. He afterward returned to Illinois and took 
charge of an elevator in Peoria county, where he continued for two 
years. He then again went to Nebraska and represented a Chicago 
com])any in the grain trade at Ord. 

It was Avhile lie was residing in Castleton, Illinois, that ]Mr. 



i8 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

lloadley was married, on the 22d of June, 1898, to ]Miss Agnes B. 
Ruhl, a native of Illinois, who was horn at Topeka. Her father. 
Dr. A. X. Ruhl, was a native of Ohio and was married in l""ort 
AVayne, Indiana, to JNIiss Elizaheth Dickey. He has engaged in 
the drug business at various places, hut is now devoting his attention 
alone to the practice of medicine in Oklahoma. He served his coun- 
try as a soldier of the Civil war and has always been loyal in his 
citizenship. 

Following his marriage, Mr. Hoadley engaged in the grain busi- 
ness at Castleton for ten years, and in 1903 came to La Fayette, 
where he pinx'hased an elevator and grain l)usiness and also a resi- 
dence. He has likewise invested in good land in Kansas, where he 
owns an improved farm. His business affairs are capably managed 
and in their control he has disjjlayed sound judgment and keen dis- 
crimination. He has ever based his advancement upon industry, 
and his life record indicates what may lie accomplished through 
resolute and determined purpose. 

To Mr. and ]Mrs. Hoadley have been born two ilaughters, Grace 
and Dorothy, who are now students in the La Fayette school. The 
family home is an attractive one and its warm-hearted hospitality 
is greatly enjoyed by their many friends. ]Mrs. Hoadley is a mem- 
ber of the ^Methodist Episcopal church and she and the elder daughter 
are active workers and teachers in the Sunday school. ]Mr. Hoadley 
supports the republican party but has never sought nor desired office. 
He is loyal in matters of citizenship, however, and works for those 
interests which he believes will be of value and benefit to the com- 
munity. 



J. RANDALL BLACK. 

J. Randall Black, one of the active, energetic and prominent 
l)usiness men of Toulon, has for years operated extensively in the 
field of real estate, diu-ing which period he has negotiated many 
important realty transfers and thereby has contributed much to the 
development and upbuilding of the district. Toulon numbers him 
among her native sons, his birth having here ocein-red October 12, 
1873. His father, John Black, was born in County Cavan, Ireland, 
]May l-l, 1827, and there spent the period of his boyhood and youth. 
In 1851 he came to the new world and made his way direct to Stark 
county, where he joined some friends. He was for a time engaged 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 49 

in carpenter work in Toulon, and in this city he married INIiss Eliza- 
heth ^Nlason, a native of Ohio, who was horn in Ashkuid county. Her 
father, ^Vilhanl ^lason, removed from Ohio to Illinois and took up 
his abode on a farm near Toulon, on which Mis. Black was reared. 
Following their marriage the young couple began their domestic 
life in Toulon, where ]Mr. Black Avorked at his trade, and for a 
number of years he also carried on general farming, but eventually 
he put aside business interests and activities and lived retired in 
Toxdon until called to the home beyond, his death occurring Decem- 
ber 31, 1H!)8. He was a valued and consistent member of the ^Masonic 
and Odd Fellows lodges of Toulon and was an earnest Christian 
gentleman. He had been reared in the Episcopal faith, but after- 
ward became a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and its 
teachings guided him in all of his life's relations, making him a 
man whom to know was to respect and honor. To him and his wife 
were born but two children, the daughter being ^Nliss JNIattie Black, 
\\ho resides with her mother in Toulon. She is identified with the 
Eastern Star, the ladies' auxiliary of JNIasonry, and both she and 
her Diother are devoted members of the ^Methodist Episcopal chui-ch. 

At the usual age J. Randall Black became a i)upil in the public 
schools and passed through consecutive grades to his graduation from 
the high school. Later he attended the INIichigan University at Ann 
Arbor, where he pursued the literary course and also did work in 
the engineering department. At the close of his junior year, how- 
ever, he left the university and later learned the trade of a jeweler 
and engraver. Subsequently he turned his attention to the real estate 
business, opening an office in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, about 1902. 
He is extensively engaged in the sale of Alberta lands and has main- 
tained an office there for thirteen years. He helped lay out an aildi- 
tion to the city of a one hundred acre tract, known as the EnglcAvood 
addition, and lu^w one of the best populated and most attractive 
residence sections of that city. jNIr. Black covered the whole of 
Alberta province by horseback, by stage, on bicycle and on foot. 
He has sold large tracts of Canadian lands, and in 1910 he also 
opened an office in Tovilon, where he now spends about half of his 
time, devoting his attention to his real estate business here and also 
handling city ])roperty in Edmonton. Recently he has further ex- 
tended the scope of his business to include the sale of Florida lands. 
He is a most enterprising and energetic real estate man, ready for 
any emergency and ever alert to an opjjortunity. 

Like his mother and sister, ]Mr. Black holds membership in the 
Methodist Episcopal church of Toulon and is also identified with the 



50 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

Odd Fellows lodge. He has attractive social qualities and many 
admirable characteristics which ha\'e won for him the good will, con- 
fidence and esteem of all with whom he has been associated. 



ROBERT THOMPSON. 

Robert Thompson has made an excellent record as cashier of 
the Exchange Bank of Bradford and is recognized as a man of 
business acumen and soinid iudgmcnt. His wife, Rosa L. Thomp- 
son, is president of the institution and owns all of the stock. ^Ir. 
Thompson was born in Bolton, Lancashire, England, on the 18th 
of June, 18.5.5, but when a child was brought by his parents 
to the United States, the family locating at Altoona, Pennsylvania. 
The father, who was an expert mechanic and engineer, died in 1873 
Avhen sixty-four years old. The mother passed away when sixty- 
eight years of age, in 1881. 

Robert Thompson was educated in Altoona. and on beginning 
his independent career went to Newark, New Jersey, where he 
worked as a decorator, in which connection he did considerable fres- 
coing. In 1876 he decided to try his fortune in the middle west and 
came to Stark county, Illinois, where he followed his trade for some 
time. Not long after his marriage to Miss Rosa L. Leet. in 1881, 
he accepted the cashiership of the Exchange Bank of Bradford, 
which position he has since held. He has given careful thought and 
study to the problems of banking and to local conditions, and as he 
is also thoroughly familiar with the routine of banking practice he 
is well qualified to discharge his responsible duties. The bank was 
formerly owned by his father-in-law, William Leet, a sketch of 
Avhom appears elsewhere in this work, and ^Irs. Thomi)son now 
owns all the stock of the institution and is serving as its president. 
Following the death of her father, the heirs at law formed a co- 
partnership and 3Irs. Thompson was given the control and super- 
vision of the Bradford Exchange Bank, and in the management of 
its affairs has displayed the hard-headed business sense and the 
finnness of her father, and at the same time has sought to make the 
bank of the greatest possible service to the community. She takes 
a keen interest in the advancement of the public welfare, is broad- 
minded in her views and, moreover, possesses a personality that gains 
her the warm friendship of those closely associated with her. She 
owns other property and is one of the wealthiest women of the county. 



HISTORY OF STAllK LOUXTY 51 

yiv. Thompson and Rosa L. Leet were inarricd on the 29tli of 
December, 1881, and became the parents of two children: CUuide 
R., Avho died on the 'id of November, 191.3; and William Leet. 

3Ir. Thompson has taken an active part in public affairs and 
has been especially interested in the cause of education. He was 
serving on the scliool board at the time the new school building- was 
erected; was made president of the building committee, and takes 
justitiable pride in the splendid building, which is conceded to be 
one of the best in the state, considering the size of Bradford. lioth 
he and his wife are active and influential members of the ^Methodist 
church, whose work they further in e\ery way possible. He also 
belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, in which he is 
popular, and is a member of Bradford Lodge, A. F. & A. M.; the 
Royal Arch chapter of Wyoming; the conunandery of Kewanee; 
and the consistory and ^Mystic Shrine of Peoria. He has made many 
friends in all relations of life and is held in high respect by those 
A\ho have come in contact with him. 



B. F. GRAVES. 



B. F. Graves, who is engaged in farming in Essex township, in 
partnershi]) with his son, Simeon Arthur, was born in that township, 
within a mile of his present farm, on the -ith of October, 1847. His 
father. James Graves, was a native of North Carolina, but was taken 
by his parents as a boy to Ross county, Ohio, whence he removed in 
1847 to Stark county, Illinois. He became the owner of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres of land in Essex township and was identified 
with agricultural pursuits throughout his active life. He passed 
away in 1883, when he had reached the age of seventy-eight years. 
He was married in Ohio to INIiss ISIaria Francis, a native of that 
state, who died in 1901, when she was eighty years old. They were 
the parents of seven children: JMary Elizabeth, the deceased wife of 
Simeon Cox, of Essex township; B. F.; JMatilda Jane, the wife 
of G. A. Thomas, of Chicago; Frances L., the wife of INIyron Cox, 
of Essex toMnsJii]): ^Melinda Ann. who married Henry Crone, of 
Wyoming; and two who died in childhood. 

B. F. Graves was reared upon the home farm and attended the 
same school that his grandchildren are now attending. He was early 
trained in agricultmal work and for many years after attaining his 
majoi'ity farmed in partnership with his father. He inherited eighty 



52 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

acres of land and has since acquired title with his sons to all of the 
Graves honiesteail, wliich comprises two hundred and seventy acres. 
He is still active in the operation of his farm, although he soon ex- 
pects to retire and leave the cultivation of his land entirely to his 
son Simeon Arthur. He has always been enterprising in his work, 
doino- evervthing at the time when it could be most elficientlv done 
and adopting new methods when they have been proven better than 
the old. and he has also furtlier facilitated his work by tlie use of 
up-to-date machinery. He has gained a gratifying measure of iiros- 
perity and well deserves a period of leisure. 

]Mr. Graves was married about 1869 to ^Sliss ^lary E. Weber, 
who was born in Indiana on the 1st of December, ISiT. Her father, 
Philip ^Veber, removed to Essex township. Stark county, about 18.51 
and passed away in Vermilion county, this state, but her mother, who 
Avas in her maidenhood ]Miss ]Mary Jane Williams, died in the Hoosier 
state. Four children have been born to Mr. and ]Mrs. Graves. Simeon 
Arthur, who is farming in partnership with his father, married Susan 
Cornell and has four children, ]Mary Geneva, William Benjamin, 
James Henry and Emma 3Iay. Quincy I. is in business in Wyom- 
ing and a sketch of his life appears elsewhere in this work. Lena 
]Maria married William Cornell, a farmer of Essex townshi]). and 
tliey have three children, Howard ]M., ]Mary Edna and Anna. Adda 
^Matilda. Avho married Fred Dawson, a farmer of Essex township, is 
the mother of six children, John, ]Mary Lois, Benjamin G., Carl, 
Clyde and Donald Philip. 

]Mr. Graves is a loyal supporter of the democratic party but has 
never desired to hold office. He has seen much of the development of 
Stark county, as it was still largely a frontier district at the time of 
his early boyhood and he has had a part in the advancement of its 
agricultural interests for many years. 



IRA CRAXDALL REED. 

One day in the spring of 1838 a youth of nineteen knocked at the 
door of "Uncle" John White in the settlement of La Fayette and 
asked for board and lodging. This young man. with visions of a 
bright future in tlie fertile west, had left a comfortable home in the 
Nutmeg state and by stage, canal, lake and river had at last reached 
Peoria. But now he Avas Avean- and footsore, for he had Avalked the 





MR. AND MRS. IRA T. RKKI) 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLlWOiS 

URBANA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 55 

forty miles across the prairie to his journey's end. His sole material 
possessions, which later followed him by wagon, consisted of a shoe- 
maker's kit and a brass-nailed leather trunk containing an ample 
wardrobe. His fatlier, too, ha<l given him his time, which in those 
early days was thought a handsome thing to do. To these he added 
an active brain coupled with energy and industry. He came of stern 
New England stock and among his ancestors were those who suffered 
the privations of the Continental soldier as well as those who endui-ed 
the hardshii)s of the patriot at home. He was born November 11. 
1818, at Groton, Connecticut, and was christened Ira Crandall Reed. 
His grandmother, JSIary Allen, was related to Ethan Allen of Ticon- 
deroga fame. His father was a soldier in the War of 1812. 

Established in his new home, the young tradesman soon had 
more Moi-k than he could do and was known for miles around, for 
shoemaking was a fine business and the Reeds were masters of their 
craft. Today the "cobbler" makes us smile, but then every thing- 
was made by hand from the cowhide boot of the woodsman to the 
white satin pump of the bride. ^Nlany a needy woman earned her liv- 
ing by doing fine stitching and binding shoes for the shoemaker. In 
later days the subject of this sketch often spoke of Connecticut's 
famous men who had risen from the last to the judge's bench, the 
governor's chair and the senate, among them being Roger Sherman. 
On Sundays the young folks of the community would gather at some 
settler's home, often at "The North Pole," as the Cummins cabin, 
some two miles north of town, was called. From there they some- 
times walked to the schoolhouse in Fraker's Grove about four miles 
away, to meeting, and here the young man met ]Maria Charles, a gii'l 
of English parentage, though she was born in Wales. She was his 
match in courage, brain and skill. On the 5th of September, 1840, 
they joined their lives and for just fifty years they toiled together. 
JNIaterial success could hardly fail to come to such a i)air. In 184.:} 
a son, Robert Charles, was born, and he grew into a bright, genial, 
fun-loving boy beloved by young and old. 

As his business grew, JNIr. Reed employed more and more work- 
men in the shop, who became his firm friends, for he was n just 
employer as well as a friendly social man. One of these was tlie late 
Dr. Warne of Independence. Iowa. Another lawyer, J. W. Olson, 
of Galva, Illinois, still recalls his home life in the family as an 
apprentice and his friendship with Charlie as among the pleasantest 
days of his youth. AVhile active in the material develojiment of the 
town, Mr. Reed was not unmindful of its spiritual welfare and 
was a worthy member of the JNIethodist Protestant branch of the 



56 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

old South ehurdi, built in coiiiinon by the Methodist Protestants and 
Congregationalists. The words of his daily morning prayer still 
linger in his daughter's memory. Preachers of whatever creed fomid 
a most cordial welcome in his home. In 18.50 lumber was hauled from 
Chicago for a substantial residence and the boundless hospitality for 
wjiich the old house was noted was not diminished in the new. A 
friend once said of its mistress: "She makes each guest 'at home,' 
whether rich or poor, whether child, day laborer or senator." 

About this time congress and the state legislature greatly encour- 
aged the building of railroads throughout the state. Among others 
the "^iir Line" was surveyed directly north and south from Savanna 
to Alton. This went through La Fayette and hopes were high as 
eager citizens saw visions of a busy little city in the near future, foi 
the prairie grass still waved where Galva and Kewanee stand. Rail- 
road stock was bought by tliousands and soon hundreds of workmen 
grading the railroad made the village a veritable beehive. Town 
lots sold as high as one thousand dollars. The Hurd and Reed addi- 
tion was jjlatted but it was never added, for a mile south of town 
the "railroad" suddenly stopped, and La Fayette as well as all of 
little Stark was doomed to wait for many years for the shriek of the 
iron horse. Prominent citizens, among them JNIr. Reed, looked in 
each other's faces and at the ditch where laj' their buried gold. Xom' 
the remains of the old "Air Ivine," a long, green, sloping ravine, form 
an ideal coasting place for the school children in winter, who little 
dream of its tragedy of disappointment. 

In 1853 this country held its first "World's Fair"— the Crystal 
Palace in Xew York. ]Mr. Reed visited this with his wife and son. 
On the way they stojiped with relatives in Canada and at Niagara 
and in the village of Skaneateles, on the banks of its beautiful lake, 
the home of "David Harum," who was an old horse trader in the 
place. This was Maria Charles' first home in the new country and 
here the widowed mother had many friends. Before returning tliey 
visited the old New Fngland home, where relatives and friends lis- 
tened incredulous to the tales of vast prairies and wide fields of 
Indian corn. 

In 18(51 the Avar cloud darkened every home. The son, not yet 
eighteen, like thousands of liis age, said, "I must go." He joined 
tlie La Fayette Rifles, Com])any B, Thirty-seventh Regiment, known 
as the Fi-emont Rifles. Ten weeks later Ijieutenant Jackson brought 
home his silent form wrapped in the stars and stripes. Though bowed 
witli grief, the parents did not falter but worked Anth all their 
sti'engtli to help preserve the Union. Tlie Soliliers' Aid met often 



HISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY 57 

ill their home, scraping- lint from every scrap of Ihieii, winding 
bandages, packing boxes and doing everything that could be done to 
aid the boys in blue. Another soi-rovv came and Kllen, a thoughtful 
child of seven years, followed her soldier brother. A second son came 
to tlie saddened home and brouglit a gleam of cheer, but still their 
cup t)f sorrow was not full, for after two bright, sunny years 
death claimed the little Edward Sellon. A child of live alone was 
left of all the four, the daughter Amy, now Mrs. Alva Janes, the 
writer of this sketch. In 18G4 the family moved to a farm adjacent 
to the town, though the home was a half mile away, across the 
line in Knox, which they named Maple Grove. Each spring they 
made the maple sugar, in those days boiling the sap in great iron 
kettles in the open. INIaple Grove Farm still retains its name and 
fame for sugar, although the grove now has a fair ground in. its 
borders. In the late 'OOs thej' tt)ok a boy of three, one of the mother- 
less children of Captain Peyton of Galva. This foster son, Anthony 
Jay, they cherished almost as their own and bequeathed him two 
liundred acres of land in Iowa. 

Having acciuired land in Clarke and Decatur counties of Iowa, 
JMr. Keed spent much time there in later j'cars and engaged exten- 
sively in cattle raising. Centennial year he again made a tour of tlie 
eastern states, taking with him his wife and daughter and a niece, 
Kate Driscoll. At last in 1887 failing strength caused him to retire 
and the farms were rented, though the home at Maple Grove was still 
retained. In the summer of 1890 he and his wife went to the western 
coast in hopes of regaining strength. The trip was much enjoj-ed but 
healtli was not improved. On their return plans were made to celebrate 
their golden wedding, but the celebration was not to be, for on the 
morning of his golden wedding daj% September .), 1890, JMr. Reed 
very (juietly fell asleep. Perliaps no man in tlie comniunity was 
l)etter known or more respected, for he had lived a generous, upright 
Christian life. 

His widow trod life's path alone for more than sixteen years. 
Her sympathies were Inroad. Her zeal in any cause she loved was 
great. She entered heart and soul into the temperance work and 
loved to entertain white rilibon women. In 189.5 she. with lier 
daughter, attended the world's convention of the Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union in London and gratified a long desire to see once 
more her native Wales. In 1897 she built and equipped the I. C. 
Reed library, which she donated to the village. She was a woman 
of great business ability, frugal yet public-spirited and generous. 
Strong in will and character, her influence was felt ])y all who came 



58 HISTORV OF STAllK COUNTY 

in touch with lier. On the 20th of December. 1006, at the aae of 
eighty-three, she crossed the silent stream and another iJioneer liad 
reached the great beyond. 



MARION L. HAY. 

^Marion L. Hay is one of the well known citizens of Stark county, 
filling the office of master in chancery and also that of city attorney 
in Toulon. He was born on the old family homestead in Bureau 
county. Illinois, .June 28. 1884, and it was upon the same farm, a 
short distance east of Bradford, that his father's birth occurred, Sep- 
tember 22, 18G3. The latter. Leroy S. Hay, was a son of Robert 
Hay, who was born in Indiana and was of Scotch j)arentage. his 
father having come from Scotland to ^Vmerica in 1812. Robert Hay 
became a pioneer settler of Illinois, casting in his lot m ith the early 
residents of Bureau county. He there owned a large tract of land of 
three hundred and twenty acres, whereon he resided for many years. 
He likewise had land in Henry county. His son, Leroy S. Hay. was 
reared on the old homestead property in Bureau county, was mar- 
ried in that locality and afterward followed farming but subsequently 
turned his attention to business interests in Princeton. 

^Marion L. Hay, whose name introduces this review, is indebted 
to the i)ublic schools of Bureau county for the early educational op- 
portunities Avhich he received. He attended school for a time iu 
Bradford and afterward entered Eureka College at Eureka. Illinois. 
A\here he completed the work of the sophomore year. Eventually he 
became a student in the Chicago Law School, and in 1910 was ad- 
mitted to the bar. after which he began practice in Bradford, remain- 
ing there until ^Nlarch, 1911.. He Avas ajjpointed master in chancery 
of Stark county in Fel)ruary, 1913, and took charge of the office. 
He was also made city attorney and in addition to his work in those 
capacities he keeps a set of abstracts and does other business. He 
has made a notable record foi- a young man as one of marked energy, 
laudal)le ambition and notably strong executive force. 

Mr. Hay was married in Rock Island. June 28. 1907, to :\Iiss 
Catherine Giles, who was there born and reared and is a graduate of 
the Rock Island high school. JNlr. Hay erected an attractive resi- 
dence at ]Maplewood, built in modern style of architecture, and there 
they are rearing their family, consisting of four children: Leroy 
Giles, Wilton Shriver, Doris Rowena and 3Iargaret Catherine. 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 59 

In his political views JNIr. Hay is an earnest republican who has 
served as a delegate to county and state conventions and has taken 
an active part in campaign work. He and his wife hold membership 
in the ^lethodist Episcopal clun-ch, in the work of which he is most 
actively interested, and in the Sunday school he is teacher of a class 
of boys. He holds membership in Toulon Lodge, F. & A. M., and 
while in Bradford served as master of his lodge. He was a delegate 
to. the grand lodge in 1913. He is also identified with the Odd 
Fellows lodge of Toulon. He displays many of the sterling traits of 
his Scotch ancestry and is regarded as one of the representative 
young business men of his city — a man who recognizes and utilizes 
opportunities that others pass heedlessly by and who in the conduct 
t)f his business affairs so directs his efi^orts as to produce the l)est 
possible results. 



J. F. FINNEGAN. 



J. F. Finnegan is a member of the firm of Meehan & Finnegan, 
who are engaged in the implement business, and in connection JNIr. 
JMeehan also conducts a blacksmith and repair shop. Because of 
their recognized ability in this line heavy demands are made upon 
theii- time and energies by a business which is steadily growing. 

JNIr. Finnegan is a native of Bureau county, Illinois, born De- 
cember 8, 1880. his ])arents being John and Mary Anne (Hearn) 
Finnegan. The father, a native of Ireland, was brought to the 
United States when but four years of age, the family home being 
established in Wheatland township. Bureau county, Illinois, in which 
county he remained for many years but is now living in Bradford. 
His wife was born in this state. 

J. F. Finnegan began his education in the schools of 3Iilo, 
Bureau county, and afterward continued his studies in the public 
schools of Bradford and in the Peru (111.) College, from which he 
was graduated with the class of 1902. He was reared to the occu- 
pation of farming and continued to follow tliat pursuit until about 
fi\'e years ago, when lie joined P. J. JMeehan and organized the busi- 
ness now conducted under the firm name of Meehan & Finnegan. 
They carry a large line of implements of standard manufacture, 
also shelf and heavy hardware, and Mr. JMeehan con(hicts a black- 
smith and repair shop. They deal in buggies and wagons and handle 
the Allen automobile. Their business utilizes a floor space of one 



60 HISTORY OF STxVRK COUNTY 

hundred bj^ twenty feet on the tirst floor and seventy hy twenty feet 
on the second floor. Their trade has grown along substantial lines 
and ]Mr. Finnegan has shown his ability in the control of commercial 
interests. He is a niemljer of St. John's Catholic church and also 
of the Knights of Columbus. He is now well known in Bradford, 
Avhere his uniform courtesy, geniality and affability have won him 
pojjularity in social circles. 



ROBERT McROCOCK. 

In the history of the agriciUtural development of Stark county 
it is imperative that jiiention be made of Robert ]McBocock. long 
well known as a prominent farmer, valued citizen and a loyal friend 
to the community in which he made his home. He passed away here, 
January 19, 188G, being at that time sixty-one years of age, his birth 
having occurred in Ohio, December 19, 1825. He was a lad of eleven 
years when his jjarents, Flijah and Barbara (]McKinney) Bocock, 
removed to Fulton county, Illinois, settling on a farm about Ave 
miles from Canton, in which locality their son Robert was reared. 
He was named Robert ]McKinney Bocock, but always wrote his 
name ]McBoccok, although others of the family used just Bocock. 
After attending common schools he learned the cooper's trade, which 
he continued to follow for three years after his marriage. 

It was on the 10th of January, 1848, that he wedded ]Miss Eliza- 
beth R. Culton, who was born in Fulton county. Illinois. December 
13, 1831, of the marriage of John J. and Abigail H. (]Mitc]iell) 
Culton. Her father, a native of Tennessee, was reared in Kentucky, 
where jNIrs. Culton was born, but her girlhood days were passed in 
Indiana, where she became the wife of John J. Culton. They re- 
moved westward to Illinois, casting in their lot with the pioneer set- 
tlers of Fulton county, and later they went to Bradford, Stark 
county, where the father died in 1890. His widow lived to be more 
than a nonagenarian. Their family numbered eleven children, of 
whom iNIrs. ]McBocock Avas the second in order of birth. 

Following their marriage, ^Ir. and ]Mrs. McBocock resided in 
Fulton county, upon a rented farm for two years, at the end of which 
time they made investment in eighty acres of partially improA-ed 
land in Penn township. Stark county. With characteristic energy 
3Ir. ]McBocock began the development of the property and as his 
financial resources increased extended the boundaries of his farm 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 61 

until he owned a large and valuable tract of land and became one of 
the prosperous agriculturists of Penn township. In business affairs 
he displayed sound judgment and unfaltering enterprise and was 
ne\er known to take advantage of the necessities of another in a 
trade transaction. 

]Mr. and ]Mrs. ]McBocock became the parents of ten children, of 
whom six are yet living: Thomas Jasper, a resident of Omaha, is 
married and has four children; AVilliam C, a stock dealer of Wyom- 
ing, Illinois, is married and has one child; xVbigail J., of AVyoming, is 
tlie widow of Jefferson Frances and has two children; Sarah JNI. is 
tiie wife of Frederick Ditewig and they have three children; James 
S., of A\'yoming. is married and has one child; and Alva E.. a resi- 
dent of Peoria, is married and has one child. 

In ])olitics ]Mr. ]McBocock was an earnest and stalwart republican 
and filled a number of local offices, the duties of which he discharged 
in a capable and satisfactory manner. For sixteen years he ruled 
fairly and imi)artially as a justice of the peace in Penn townshij), and 
on retiring from that office was elected supervisor. Avhich position he 
filled to the time of his death. He Avas also for a long period a 
member of the school board and the cause of education found in 
him a stalwart cham])ion. While his own educational privileges 
were somewhat limited, he added contiimously to his knowledge by 
reading, observation and study and was a well informed man. His 
life was upright and honorable, winning for him confidence and Avarm 
regard, so that his death was the occasion of widespread regret. 
About 1890 his Avidow removed to Wyoming, where she still makes 
her home. She has long been a devoted member of the Congrega- 
tional church, and her life has been characterized by kindly purpose, 
high ideals and many good deeds. The long residence of the family 
in Stark county well entitles them to representation in this volume. 



JAMES R. HOLGATE, .AI. D. 

Dr. James R. Holgate, who has gained a creditable ])lace for him- 
self in professional circles of Stark county, is a native of the county, 
his birth having occurred in Penn township on the 2-tth of September, 
1841. A sketch of his father, James Holgate. appears elsewhere in 
this work. As a boy and youth he divided his time between assisting 
his father with the farm work and attending the district schools and 
later he continued his education in the schools of Henry, Toulon and 



62 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

Cherry Grove and in Rush Medical College of Chicago, from Avhich 
he was graduated in 1869 with the degree of M. D. He furst opened 
an othce for jjractice in Castleton and remained there for many years 
l)ut in 1892 went to Alabama, where he purchased land and engaged 
in farming for five years. He did not find conditions there as much 
to his liking as in this county and so returned to Wyoming, where he 
has since practicetl his jjrofession with gratifying success. He has 
always studied his cases carefully and his long experience has sup- 
plemented the training which he received in school and the knowledge 
which he has gained through wide reading along professional lines. 
He has been very successful in tlie treatment of disease and is ac- 
corded a large and representative patronage. 

Dr. Holgate was married April 2(j, 1873, to ]Miss Emma Stim- 
son, who was born in New York state and was engaged in teaching- 
school previous to her marriage. She passed away in Castleton, in 
the faith of the Congregational church. She was the mother of four 
children, as follows: Winsor R., who is in the employ of the Bell Tele- 
phone Company in ^Montana; Leslie ]M., who is also a resident of 
^Montana and is working for the Bell Telephone Company; June 
Rhea, who died when nine years of age: and Bliss B. who is living in 
Great Bend, Kansas, and is in the service of the Arkansas Yalley 
Telephone Company. 

Dr. Holgate is independent in politics and although he has always 
kept well informed as to the (juestions before the people has never 
been an office seeker as his professional work has required his undi- 
vided attention. He holds mem])ership in the ^lasonic lodge at Wy- 
oming, an association which indicates the principles that govern his 
conduct. Xot only is his ability as a physician recognized but all Avho 
know him testify to his genuine worth and his loyalty in friendship. 



E. B. PACKER, M. D. 



Dr. E. B. Packer is one of the prominent representatives of the 
medical profession in Stark county. For fifteen years he has been 
actively engaged in practice in Toulon, where his ability is recognized 
in a growing patronage. He was born near this city June 9, 1864, 
a son of Benjamin Packer, a native of New York, born in 1818. The 
father was reared in the Empire state and there wedded ]Miss Han- 
nah I^von, who was also born and reared in Xew York. In 18.51 they 
removed westward to Illinois, settling in Toulon township. Stark 



Lf8RARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

USBAWA 




DR. 10. IJ. l'A( KKR 




MRS. K. I!. I'ACKKi; 



LI3RARY 

UNIVERSITY OP ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 67 

county, where the father secured a tract of wihl huul which he de- 
vek)pe(l and cultivated, ultiniately becoming the owner of a splenchdly 
improved farm of eight hunth'cd acres. He was very successful both 
in the cultixation of grain and in the raising of stock and was long 
ninnl)ere(l among the i)rominent agriculturists of his community. 
Upon iiis farm he reared his family and later removed to Toulon, 
retiring from active business life. There he spent his remaining days, 
his deatii occurring ^lay l.'J, 11)0.5, while his wife passed away in 1900. 
When death called them Stark county lost two of its most valuable, 
worthy and respected pioneer citizens. In their family were ten chil- 
dren: the Rev. Eli Packer, now living on a jNIichigan farm; Rev. INIor- 
timer Packer, located at Longbeach, California; Ezra L., a retired 
farmer and capitalist living in Toulon; Cliarles L., who makes his 
home in Oklahoma City; Camilla JM., who became the wife of Miller 
Patterson but both are now deceased; Frances, the wife of Thomas 
Hartley, living at Princeton, Illinois; E. B., of this review; Burton 
and .lennie, who died in early life; and Maggie, who completes the 
family. 

Dr. I'acker is the only one of this large family that has turned to- 
medical i)ractice as a life work. He attended the ])ublic schools of 
Toulon until graduated from the high school and afterward became 
a student in Doane Academy at Granville, Ohio, where he completed 
a coui'se. and next entered Denison University at Granville, from 
which institution he was graduated in 189.5 with the Bachelor of Arts 
degree. With broad literary training to serve as the foundation upon 
which to rear the su])erstructure of professional knowledge, he en- 
tered the Jefferson Medical College at Philadelphia and completed 
a four years' course there by graduation with the class of 1899. He 
later had the benefit of ])ractical experience for three months in Jef- 
ferson Hospital, after which he I'etm-ned to this state, settling at Viola 
in 1899. There he entered upon the practice of his chosen profession 
and in 1900 he came to Toulon, where he has since devoted his time 
and energies to medical and surgical practice. He has built up a good 
business and at all times he kee])s in touch with the advanced thought 
and methods of the profession. He has also made some profitable 
investments and now owns valuable land in Florida. 

At ^Mansfield, Ohio, on the 11th of April, 1900, Dr. Packer was 
married to JNIiss Artie E. Colby, who was born and reared in that 
])lace. She completed her education at Denison Universitv, Gra)i- 
ville, Ohio, and for two years was a teacher. To Dr. and jMrs. Packer 
have been born eight children: jNIary Hannah; Florence, who died 
at the age of nine months; Henry Colby; Frances; Elizabeth; William 



68 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

Harvey; JMortimer and 3Iartha. Dr. and ]Mrs. Packer beoan tlieir 
domestic life in Toulon, \\here he purchased his father's old home. 
He now owns not only a nice residence property but also a two-story 
brick office building and in addition has the Florida interests i)revi- 
ously mentioned. 

Both Dr. and 31rs. Packer are consistent and active members of 
the Baptist church and are workers in both church and Sunday school. 
JNIrs. Packer is also identified with the ladies' auxiliary societies of 
the church and is a meml)er of tlie Woman's Club of Toulon. Dr. 
Packer belongs to the Stark County ^Medical Society, of wliich lie is 
now the vice president, and is also a member of the State and Ameri- 
can jNledical Associations. He ever keeps in touch with the latest 
scientific investigations and researches and his broad knowledge is 
evidenced in the success wliich has attended his professional labors. 



J. 31. LIGGETT. 



J. jNI. Liggett, living on section 21, Osceola township, is the owner 
of a very valuable tract of land of three hundred and fifty-six acres, 
in the midst of which stands a palatial residence with all of the build- 
ings and equipments which are accessories to a model farm of the 
twentieth century. He is a representative of one of the old time fami- 
lies of the countj' that in early days experienced many of the hard- 
ships and privations incident to frontier life. 

Mr. Liggett has now passed the seventieth milestone on life's 
journey, his birtli having occurred in Salem township. AVarren county, 
Ohio, on the 2d of ^Nlay, 184G, his parents Iteing ^Villiam and Anne 
(JNIedaris) Liggett. The father was born in 1806, and the mother's 
birth occurred near Sidney, Ohio, in 182'2. They were married in 
Warren county, that state, in 184'2. and in the fall of 18.54 came to 
the middle west, reaching Klmira township on the 9th of Xovenil)er. 
There they established their home and "Sir. Liggett at once began 
the develojiment and cultivation of the land. Their first residence was 
a log cabin, but he replaced that by a more modern dwelling in 18.57. 
Year after year he carefully and systematically tilled the soil, continu- 
ing the work of the farm up to the time of liis death, which occurred 
on the 23d of April. 187-5. To his original purchase he had added 
more land mitil within the borders of his farm were embraced about 
two hundred acres. He was a self-made man who deserved mucli 
credit for what he accomplished. In comnumity affairs he was inter- 





BENJAMIN I'AL'KEK MRS. BENJAMIN PACKER 



!'_:""-"Y 

UNiVERSIir 1 i lillMOiS 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 71 

ested and held some of tlie minor offices. His widow survived him 
for some time and passed away in 1904. 

J. JM. Liggett began his education in one of tlie old-time log school- 
houses. Pie was a lad of but eight years when the family came to 
Illinois, and he remained upon the old homestead until 1S71, when he 
went to Iowa. Later he returned and continued on the home farm 
until 187.5, when he jiurchased land on section 21, Osceola township. 
Ljjon this farm he has since resided and has wrought a marked trans- 
formation in its appearance, owing to the excellent improvements 
which he has jjut upon it. He has erected a large and attractive resi-. 
deuce, has built commodious barns and outbuildings, giving ample 
shelter for grain and stock, and has divided his place into fields of 
convenient si/e by well kept fences. Within the borders of his farm 
are three hundred and fifty-six acres situated on sections 21 and 28, 
Osceola tow nshiiJ, and the land is devoted to general agricultural pur- 
suits, for he raises all of the crops best adapted to soil and climatic 
conditions. 

In 1878 Mr. Liggett was married to ]Miss Nettie A. Damon, and 
they have five children: Earl, a farmer living in Osceola townshij); 
Blanche, the wife of Joseph Scott, occupying a farm near her fathers; 
Thomas, who makes his home near Bradford; Hazel, the wife of Al- 
bert Cojjp. living in Bureau county, Illinois; and one who died in 
infancy. 

For one term ^Ir. Liggett filled the office of supervisor, and he 
has been road boss, while for a quarter of a century he served as school 
director. He maintains an independent course in regard to politics 
and religion, feeling that he has the right to determine these things 
for himself. Nor is he connected with any lodges. He has ever con- 
centrated his efforts upon his business interests, and his close applica- 
tion has been one of the salient features in his growing prosperity. 



GEORGE S. WALKER. 

George S. Walker, member of the firm of Walker Brothers, of 
Toulon, is one of the active business men of the city to whom opj)or- 
tunity has ever been the open door to success. Early in life he 
recf)gnized the fact that industry wins and he has therefore lived a 
most industrious life, determined that success should be his if it 
could be won through earnest, persistent and honorable eff'ort. He 
was born in Toulon, May 2, 18G8, a son of U. J. Walker, a native 



72 HISTORY OF STARK COT XT V 

of Philadelphia, born in 1840. The paternal grandfather eanie to 
the new world from Ireland after his marriage and settled in I'hila- 
delphia, where some of his children were born. He removed west- 
ward to Illinois and afterward to Iowa, where his death occurred. 

D. J. Walker was brought to the middle west during his child- 
hood days and afterward settled in Toulon, where he became identi- 
fied with the banking business as a cashier. Subsequently he was 
elected county clerk and after serving for one term was reelected 
and again and again was chosen for the office until he had occupied 
that position for sixteen consecutive years. He was still the incum- 
bent in the position when death claimed him on the 18th of Decem- 
ber, 1889. He was one of the best known and most highly respected 
citizens of the county, enjoying the entire confidence and esteem of 
all with whom he came in contact, for his life measured up to the 
highest standards of manhood and of citizenship. He belonged to 
the Congregational church and was one of its most active and help- 
ful workers and liberal supporters. He was also identified with the 
Independent Order of Odd Fellows and worked his way ujjward 
th]-ough its various offices vuitil he became a past grand. In Toulon 
he married Estella Rhodes, a native of Ohio, where she was reared 
and who still survives her husband. 

The youthful days of George S. Walker were spent in the usual 
manner of the town-bred boy and when he had completed his educa- 
tion Avith a course in the Toulon high school he took up the work of 
clerkinff in 1884, enterino- the establishment in which he and his 
brother now carry on business. He was employed as a salesman 
until 1893 and in the meantime thoroughly ac(]uainted himself with 
every phase of the business. He then purchased a half interest, be- 
coming a partner of jNIr. Swank, with whom he was associated until 
1907, at which time his brother, H. W. AValker. purchased the in- 
terest of Mr. Swank. The firm of Walker Brothers now have a 
large general mercantile store, carrying an attractive line of goods, 
which includes groceries, dry goods and many othei- commodities. 
Their trade is very extensive and their patronage is growing year 
by year. 

On the 26th of November, 1890, Mr. Walker was married in 
Toulon to Miss INIary L. INIorrison, a native of this city, her birth 
having occiu'red on the property adjacent to the Walker home. Her 
father, John W. ^Morrison, was one of the early settlers of the county 
and for some years served as superintendent of the comity farm. To 
Mr. and INIrs. Walker have been born five children wjio are vet living: 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 73 

llan-y Leroy and John M., who are clerking in tlieir father's store; 
JNlary ; Donovan G. ; and Dorothy. 

The family are all members of the Congreoational church, and 
foi- many years ^Ir. \\^alker has been connected A\ith the choir, while 
in other departments of church work he takes an active and helpful 
interest. He belongs to the Odd Fellows lodge, in which he has lilled 
all t)f the offices and is now past grand. He is likewise identified with 
the JNIodern Woodmen of America and the Court of Honor. His 
jjolitical allegiance is given to the republican party and he has served 
in various positions of honoi- and trust in the city and has also been 
a delegate to county and state conventions. His life has been well 
spent. Industry, close application and honesty have brought him 
success in business and many sterling traits have gained him the high 
regard of those among whom his entire life has been passed. Almost 
ever}' one in Toulon knows George S. Walker and all speak of him 
in terms of warm regard. 



HARRY W. WALKER. 

Harry W. ^Valkei-, a son of D. J. Walker, the junior partner of 
the general mercantile Hiin of Walker Rrothers in Toulon, was born 
June 12, 1871, in the city in which he still makes his home, and in the 
acquirement of his education he passed through consecutive grades in 
the public schools and sui)])leinented his high school training by further 
study in an academy. His initial step in business was made as a clerk 
in the employ of C. INI. Swank, with whom he remained for fifteen 
years. In the meantime his brother had become a jjartner in the 
business and at length H. W. Walker purchased JNIr. Swank's interest 
and the present firm of \Valker Brothers was thus established in 1907. 
They carry a large line of dry goods, clothing, men's furnishings, 
groceries, boots and shoes and have built up a trade of very gratifying- 
proportions, their business exceeding in volume and importance that 
i)f any other store in the county. Their establishment is neat and taste- 
fully arranged and the business is conducted with the strictest regard 
to a high standard of commercial ethics. 

On the 24.th of July, 1901, in Toulon, Mr. Walker wedded Miss 
Lora Fuller, a daughter of W. W. Fuller, of Toulon. She was born 
and reared in Klmira, this county, and received her education in the 
Toulon Academy, graduating in the class of 1897- This marriage has 
been blessed with two sons, Philiii F. and Paul II. 



74 HISTORY OF STAllK COUNTY 

JNIr. ^Valkel• served as school treasurer for a number of years and 
the cause of education has always found in him a stalwart champion. 
He has likewise been alderman of his ward and he stands for all those 
things which are a matter of civic virtue and of civic pride. In politics 
he is a stanch republican. He is prominently known in the Odd Fel- 
lows lodge, in which he has three times passed all of the chairs, being 
the present treasurer, and he is also a member of the ^Modern Wood- 
men of America. He has been a delegate to the Grand Lodge of 
Odd Fellows, and his wife is connected with the Rebekahs. Both are 
members of the Congregational church, in which he and his brother 
have been choir members for years. Both are dee])ly interested in 
all those forces which work for the uplift of the indi\idual and the 
betterment of the community, and their lives have conformed to high 
standards of manhood and citizenship, winning for them the confi- 
dence and goodwill of all with whom they ha^•e been brought in contact. 



ROBERT M. KING, M. D. 

Dr. Robert 31. King, who has engaged in the practice of medi- 
cine in Wyoming for eighteen years and who ranks high in his pro- 
fession, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, on the 15th of April. 18G4. 
His father, John King, was also a native of that country and held 
the position of int boss there when in 1864 he resigned to come to the 
United States. At the time that the family sailed for America our 
suliject was but six weeks old, so that practically his entire life has 
been spent in this country. After landing at Xew York on the 14th 
of June. 186-1, the family continued their way westward to Sparland, 
ftlarshall county, Illinois, and subsequently they removed to Camp 
Grove, Saratoga township, where the father purchased land. He 
was successful in agricultural pursuits and became the owner of two 
hundred and fifty acres of excellent land, all of which was under cul- 
tivation. Both he and his wife were Presbyterians, and their religious 
faith was the motive force of their daily lives. She died in 1878 and 
he passed away many years later, his demise occurring in 1911. Eight 
of their eleven children are still living. 

Robert INI. King passed his boyhood and youth upon the home 
farm and gave much of his time to assisting his father. However, his 
education was not neglected and after attending the district schools 
he became a student in the old Northwestern Normal School at Gene- 
seo, Illinois, and later entered Highland Park College at Des ^Moines. 



I 



HISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY 75 

Iowa. He did his professional work at the Louisville JNIedical Col- 
lege in Louisville, Kentucky, from which he was graduated in 181)8 
with the degree of M. D. He located for practice in Wyoming, Illi- 
nois, and has met with such a gratifying measure of success that he 
has since remained here. He is careful in making a diagnosis to take 
into consideration all possible factors in the case, and in his methotl 
of treatment utilizes the latest discoveries of medical science. He 
not only has the confidence of the people as is evidenced by his large 
and representative practice, but he is also held in high esteem bj^ his 
professional colleagues. He is in comfortable circumstances and owns 
a good two hundred and fortj^ acre farm in JNIinnesota and eighty 
acres in Stark county. 

Dr. King A\as married December 6, 190.5, to JMiss Xellie Wriglev, 
a native of this county and a daughter of Samuel ^Vrigley, a sketch 
of whom appears elsewhere in this work. Dr. and jNIrs. King have 
a daughter, Margaret Joan, who is named for her two grandmothers. 

Dr. King is a democrat in politics but has been too busj' with his 
professional duties to take an active part in public aifairs. He be- 
longs to the jMasonic lodge at Wyoming and the beneficent spirit of 
that organization finds expression in his daily life. He is recognized 
as one of the leading citizens of Wyoming, and his genuine worth has 
gained him the warm regard of those who have been closely associated 
with him. 



CHARLES N. GOOD. 



Charles N. Good, who carries on general farming on section 8, 
Elmira township, was born in Weathersfield township, Henry county, 
Illinois, February 22, 1859, a son of Samuel W. and ISIary Ann 
(Northroj)) Good. The father was a native of Zanesville, Ohio, and 
the mother of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, but in early life they re- 
moved to Illinois and were married in Henry county. The Good fam- 
ily established their home in that county in 1850, the grandfather of 
our subject becoming one of the pioneer settlers of the district. Fol- 
lowing their marriage. INIr. and ^Nlrs. Samuel W. Good lived in Henry 
county until called to their final rest, the former passing away on the 
1st of September, 1885, and the latter February 27, 1897. 

Charles N. Good had the advantage of a good school education. 
His father was a school director and believed in the employment of 
competent teachers. During the summer vacations he worked in 



76 HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 

the jfields and continued at home until he attained his niajonty, after 
which he was employed as a farm hand for two years. He then hegan 
farming- on his own account and in 1884 removed to Stark county, 
settling on a farm on sections 8 and' 9, Elmira townshii). Here he 
oAvns two hundred and forty acres of land, which he has brought to 
a high state of cultivation, and to the farm has added many improve- 
ments so that it is now a well equipped farm property, lacking in none 
of the accessories and conveniences found upon the model farms of 
Illinois in the twentieth century. In addition to this property he has 
eighty acres in ^Veathersfield township, Henry county. In 1888 he 
established a herd of shorthorn cattle upon his farm and is now ex- 
tensively and successfully engaged in breeding and raising polled 
shorthorns and also breeds Poland China hogs. His stock raising- 
interests constitute an important feature of his business anil have 
brought to him well deserved success. 

On the 11th of January, 1883, Mr. Good was united in marriage 
to ^Sliss Clara E. Hatch, a sister of Oran L. Hatch, mentioned else- 
where in this work. They now have two children: Charles ^Maxwell, 
Avho is a graduate of the high school of Kewanee and is now with the 
Central Savings & Trust Bank at Denver, Colorado; and JNIartha 
Alice, Avho is a graduate of Knox College of Galesburg and is now 
extension secretary of the Young Women's Christian Association 
work at Quincy, Illinois. 

The family are all members of the Presbyterian church, and ]Mr. 
Good is serving- as one of its elders. In politics he is a repulilican 
and has served as road commissioner. The cause of education has ever 
found in him a stalwart chami)ion and for twenty years he has been 
school director, while at the present time he is school trustee. He 
holds membership in the American Protective Association, and his 
interests and activities number him among the leading and valued 
citizens of his part of the county. 



JOSEPH CHASE. 



Joseph Chase, who for a number of years has figiu-ed promi- 
nently in connection with the public affairs of Stark county. ha\ ing 
sei-ved both as county clerk and circuit clerk, was born near Toulon 
on the 28th of October, 18.5-i. and is therefore a representative of one 
of the pioneer families of this district. He, too, has long been a 




MR. AXD MRS. JOSEPH CHASE 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

.URBAi"" 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY TJ 

\vitiies!5 of the changes which have occurred here and has home an 
active and helpful part in the work of general progress and improve- 
ment. His father, Peleg Chase, was a native of Saratoga county, 
New York, and a son of John Chase, who was nvimhered among the 
earl}' settlers of Saratoga county and was of English descent. I'eleg 
Cliase was reared in his native county and there married Fanny M. 
Taher, who was born in that county. In 1853 they removed west- 
ward to Illinois and established their home in Toulon township. Stark 
county, where Mr. Chase purchased land on which only slight im- 
provements had been made. He immetliately began the active work 
of the farm and carried on agricultural pursuits there with good suc- 
cess until 1865, when he disposed of his property and removed to 
Toulon, where he spent his last years, his death here occurring in 
1871. His wife long survived him, passuig away about 1910. Theij- 
family numbered but two children, one of wdiom, John Chase, is now 
a contractor and builder of Toulon. 

Joseph Chase was reai-ed in Stark county and in the pursuit of 
his education attended Westfield College and also Hedding College 
at ^Vljingdon, Illinois. He taught for seven winter terms in the 
home schools and also for one fall term but later concentrated his 
attention upon agricultural pursuits, owning and cultivating a tract 
of land of one himdred and sixty acres in Toulon township. He 
lived upon that place for a few years, after which he sold the prop- 
erty and bought a farm in the southern part of the county, continu- 
ing to devote his time and energies there to the tilling of the soil 
for seven years. He then removed to Toulon and sold his farm in 
1903. In 1890 he was nominated and elected to the office of county 
clerk, entering upon the duties of the i)osition in 1890 for a fo\n- 
years' term. He then retired from office but after two years, or in 
1890, was elected by the republican party to the office of circuit 
clerk, in which position he served for four years and was then re- 
elected for another term. He has been a member of the town board, 
has acted as its president and is still a member of the city coimcil of 
Toulon. His public duties have been discharged in a notably prompt, 
efficient and creditable manner, his services proving of value to the 
community. He has at different times bought and owned farms and 
lie and his wife are now oAvners of four liunched acres of land all in 
one body and all well improved, constituting a valuable and productive 
])roperty. 

On the 23d of February, 1870. near Toulon. Mr. Chase was 
united in marriage to ]Miss Sarah A. Rist, who was born and reared 
in this county and is a daughter of Martin Rist, one of its early set- 



80 HISTOKV OF STARK COL XTY 

tiers. ]Mr. and JNIrs. Chase have become the parents of eleven chil- 
dren, of whom nine are yet living, namely: Fanny A., the wife of 
James jNI. Stickney; Jennie E., the wife of S. Clyde White, a farmer 
of Toulon; Nettie M., the wife of Ray D. Nicholson, who follows 
farming in Goshen township; INIartin R., who is engaged in medical 
practice in Chicago; Helen M., at home; Pauline, who is a student 
in the Jacksonville College at Jacksonville, Illinois; Joseph H., who 
is a freshman in the State University at Urbana, Illinois; Sarah; and 
Carolyn. They lost their eldest child, Bertha L., who became the 
wife of John Dewey and died in January, 1903. A son, AVilbur P., 
was a junior in Northwestern University when death claimed him 
in August, 1912. 

JNIr. Chase is a member of the Odd Fellows lodge and both he 
and his wife are connected with the Rebekah degree. He has served 
through the chairs of the lodge, is a past grand and has been lodge 
treasurer for years. He and his family are members of the jNIethodist 
Episcopal church and in the ladies' societies of the church his wife 
takes an active part. The family occupy an attractive home which 
Mr. Chase erected thirteen years ago. They are well known in the 
city, occupying an enviable position in social circles, and high i-egard 
is entertained for them because of their sterling worth and many 
admirable traits of character. 



CHANCY R. MINER. 



Nature seems to have intended that in the evening of life man 
should enjoy a period of rest. In youth he is energetic and ambitious. 
The future looks bright and he puts forth earnest effort to achieve 
success. Later this effort is guided by mature judgment and directed 
by experience and if he is honest and earnest in his purpose, his labors 
win for him substantial prosperity, so that the evening of his days 
may be spent in the enjoyment of well earned rest. Such is the record 
of ]Mr. ISIiner, who for a long period was an active and prosperous 
farmer of Goshen township, but he now lives retired in La Fayette. 
He is, moreover, entitled to mention in this volume as one of the few 
surviving veterans of the Civil war now living in Stark county. 

It was in this county that he was born, ^larch 11, 1843, being a 
representative of one of its honored pioneer families. His father, 
Peter F. IVIiner, was born in New York and when a yovmg man came 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 81 

\\est. establishing his home among the first settlers of Goshen town- 
ship, Stark county, where he preempted eighty acres of land. Not a 
furrow had been turned nor an improvement made upon liis place 
and he performed the arduous task of breaking the sod and sjjlitting 
rails with which to fence his land. His lirst home was a primitive l(jg 
cabin, in which he lived for several years while improving his farm. 
AVhile he met hardships and privations these in turn were replaced by 
an advanced civilization and he took a helpful part in promoting the 
development and upbuilding of the district in which he lived. He was 
married here to JNliss JNIatilda F. Smith, who was born in New Fng- 
land and came to Illinois with her parents, who were among the 
earliest settlei's of the state. After farming ft)r a time JMr. ]Miner 
purchased another eighty acre tract, making his farm one of a bun- 
dled and sixt}' acres. As the years passed on he was numbered among 
the prosperous farmers of his part of the county. He erected a good 
residence, also built substantial barns and outbuildings for the shelter 
of grain and stock and developed a valuable place, the further im- 
provement of which claimed his time and energies until he was called 
to his final rest about 18.V2. His wife survived him for several years, 
dying in l^i.)(». 

Chancy R. JMiner was thus left an orphan when but a little lad of 
thii'teen years. He later spent a summer with an uncle on Spoon 
river in Illinois and he acquired his education in the district schools 
and in La Fayette. He was a j'^outh of eighteen years when the coun- 
try became involved in civil war and in August, 1861, aroused by a 
spirit of patriotism, he enlisted and joined Company 33 of the Thirty- 
seventh Illinois Infantry. This company was raised in Stark county 
and was mustered in at Chicago. After some drilling and preparation 
the regiment went south through INIissovu'i and into Arkansas, where 
they i^articipated in the battles of Pea Ridge and Prairie Grove and 
later crossed the river, taking part in the siege and capture of Yieks- 
l)urg. ]Mr. 3Iiner was subsequently placed on detached duty and 
drove a team of three span of mules through ^Missouri and Arkansas 
in connection with the commissary department. Afterward he was 
on the sick list for a time and later was sent to New Orleans, whei'e 
lie did guard duty. There he remained until he was detailed for scj-vice 
on a gunboat as a sharjjshooter. AViiile thus engaged he was taken 
prisoner by the Confederates and Mas sent to Hempstead, Texas, 
where he was held in a stockade for seven months and fourteen days, 
suffering many hardships of southei-n ])rison life. He was afterwai-d 
paroled and taken to Galveston and thence sent within the Union lines. 
At New Orleans he was mustered out and honorably discharged in 



82 HISTORY OF STARK COLXTY 

February, 180.5, after servjjig for three years and six iiioiiths iti 
defense of the nation's starry banner. 

With the close of the war 31r. ^liner retuined home. He liad 
inherited eighty acres of and which he afterward sold and tluii [)ur- 
chased an improved farm of sixty-five acres at the head of Indian 
creek. He located thereon and concentrated his efforts upon the 
work of tilling the soil and producing good crops. He further com- 
pleted his arrangements for having a home of his cnvn by his marriage 
in Goshen township, on the 19th of October, 180.5, to Miss Cliloe R. 
Parisli. who was born and reared in Stark county and is a daughter of 
Ruloff Parish, one of the early settlers of this district. Some time 
after his marriage Mr. Miner sold his farm and purchased a tract of 
one hundred and forty acres on section 22, Goshen townshi}). This 
was an old farm on which were dilapidated buildings, while the soil 
was in poor condition. However, he at once began the work of re- 
pairing buihUngs and fences, and he improved the condition of the 
soil by fertilizers and by the rotation of crops, thus bringing it again 
into a state of rich fertility. He afterward erected a modern resi- 
dence, commodious and attractive in its style of arcliitecture. He also 
built a good barn and there he carried on farming for twenty years. 
He likewise extended the boundaries of his place by a further piii- 
chase of eighty acres, so that his farm included two liundi-ed and 
twenty acres of rich and pi'oductive land. After two decades he sold 
this property to his daughter and about 1884 removed to lia Fayette, 
where he purchased a hotel property and engaged in the hotel busi- 
ness for eighteen years. He then retired from that field of activity 
and about 1900 became owner of the residence in I^a Fayette which 
he now occu])ies. This is a neat and attractive liome and lie is pleas- 
antly situated in life, his former toil having brougiit him a sufficient 
sum to enable him to enjoy many of the comforts and some of tlie 
luxuries of life. 

^Vhile living upon the farm Mr. INIiner lost liis first Avife, who 
left two daughters: Kffie INIay, now the wife of P. Frank Royce, of 
I^a Fayette, by whom she has three sons and two daughters; and Neva 
E., the M'ife <jf W. O. Clmrch, a farmer of Stark covmtj', by wlioni 
she has one son and two daugliters. jMr. Miner was again married 
December 11, 1890, in I^afayette. Miss Anna Frail becoming his wife. 
She was born and reared in this county and is a daughter of Jolin 
Frail, also a native of Stark county, where the Frail family was estali- 
lished at a very early day upon a farm near Wyoming. 

Politically Mr. Miner has been an earnest republican since he cast 
his first presidential Ijallot for Abraliam liincoln in 1804 and since 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY «3 

tliat time he has voted for every presidential nominee on the tieket. 
He has served as a ilelegate to eoiinty conventions and as a member 
of the town board. He belongs to \V. W . \Vriglit Post, G. A. R., of 
Toulon, and has ever manifested the same spirit of loyalty in citizen- 
ship that he displayed when he followed the stars and stripes upon 
the battletields of the south. He did not hesitate to respond to his 
country's call when the tocsin of war sounded and he has never hesi- 
tated to do his best for the interests of the community in which he lives, 
regarding this as the expression of true and loyal citizenship. 



R. M. SCOTT. 



While engaged in general farming R. M. Scott also raises a good 
grade of stock, specializing in milch cows. His place embraces U\o 
himdred and iifteen acres of land on section 19, Osceola township, 
in addition to which he cultivates a rented tract of land. He is one 
of the worthy citizens that Scotland has furnished to Illinois, his biith 
having occurred in Roxburghshire on the 9th of September, 1849, his 
parents being Thomas and Jane INIitehell (Hill) Scott, who spent 
their entire lives in the land of hills and heather. R. M. Scott crossed 
the Atlantic to Canada with his grandparents in 18.)7 and there re- 
mained for two years, after which he retui'ned to Scotland, contin- 
uing with his parents until 1868, in \\hich year he secured work as a 
farm hand in that country. 

Once more INIr. Scott left his native land in 1873. at which time he 
made the voyage to the United States and, continuing his join-ney 
into the interior of the country, settled in Stark county, Illinois. 
After w^orking as a farm hand for aliout four months, he went to 
Toronto, Canada, where he spent nine months, and then returned to 
this country. Renting land he lived thereon for a year, after which 
he settled on section 19, Osceola township, and purchased eighty acres 
of land. He has since added all of the improvements to the place and 
now has a well kept farm, the boundaries of which he has extended 
from time to time until he now has two hundred and fifteen acres, all 
of which he carefully cultivates iji the raising of grain, -wheat and 
other cereals. He also operates eighty acres of land which he rents, 
and in addition to general farming, he is engaged in the raising of a 
good gi'ade of stock. 

On the -id of INIarch. 1877, Mr. Scott was married to JNIiss :Mary 
]M. Turnbull, and they have seven children: INIaggie ^Mitchell, who is 



84 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

teadiing school in the home district; Anna Jane, the wife of Earl 
Liggett, residing in Osceola township; J. W., living near tlie old home 
farm; Agnes, the wife of Fred Ferris, also in the same locality; 
Thomas, whose home is near Bradford; Julia Isabel, the wife of 
Floyd Dunn of Elmira township and John Henry, at home. 

3Ir. Scott votes with the republican party upon national questions 
and issiies, but at local elections considers the cai)ability of a candidate 
without regard to his party aflBliations. He has served as road com- 
missioner and school director but has had little ambition along the 
line of office holding. He and his wife are members of the United 
Presbyterian church of Elmira, and their hiHuence is always on the 
side of right, progress and improvement. Three times since coming 
to the United States ]Mr. Scott has returned on a visit to his native 
country, renewing the acquaintances of his l)oyhood. He returns 
willingly, however, to America, for in this land he has found the op- 
portunities which he sought and in their utilization has steadily ad- 
vanced. He brought with him no false ideas concerning chances here 
offered but realized the fact that mdustry and perseverance are here 
unhampered by caste or class. Upon the foimdation of diligence and 
determination, therefore, he built his success, and he is noAv justly 
accounted one of the representative and prosiJerous farmers of his 
comminiity. 



JAMES L. GERARD. 



James L. Gerard, operating a farm of eighty acres on section 36, 
Elmira township, whereon he is engaged in the raising of full blooded 
Duroc Jersey hogs, has been a lifelong resident of Stark county. He 
was born December 19. 1873, on the farm on which he now resides, 
his parents being Charles L. and Henriette (Lesan) Gerard, the 
former a native of Xew York and the latter of Xew Hampshire. 
They were married, however, in Wisconsin, having gone to that state 
•in early life, the father having lived for a time in Ohio before his re- 
moval to AVisconsin. They removed later to Illinois, becoming early 
residents of Stark county, and ]Mr. Gerard was among those who 
sought wealth in the gold fields at Pike's Peak. l)eiug absent on thai 
trip for a year. He afterward lived in Stark county and it was abmit 
sixty years ago that he purchased the farm upon which he continued 
to reside until his death January 13. lOl-l. For a decade and a half 
he had survived his wife, who passed away September 19, 1899. 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 85 

James L. Gerard was educated in tlie common schools and also 
spent one term in study at Dixon, Illinois, hut is largelj' self-educated 
and in the school of experience has learned many valuable lessons. He 
remained at home until twenty-one years of age, after which he en- 
gaged in clerking in a store at Castleton for a year. He next went to 
Bradford, where he conducted a grocery store for a year and subse- 
quently removed to Lombardville, where he also spent one year. He 
then resumed farm work and has since given his attention to general 
agricultural pursuits. He now operates eighty acres of land that is 
naturally rich and productive, and the care and labor which he be- 
stows upon the fields results in the harvesting of good crops. He also 
devotes considerable time to the raising of full blooded Duroc Jersey 
hogs and is meeting with good success in that undertaking. 

On the 28th of ^Nlay, 1902, Mv. Gerard was united in marriage 
to INIiss JNIinnie Tracy, a highly educated woman, who Avas graduated 
from the State University of Kansas and taught in the high school 
at Larned, Kansas, for some time. To INIr. and ]Mrs. Gerard have been 
born four children, namely: James Frank, Charles Nathan, Paul 
Tracy and A^erna Florence. The parents have been members of the 
United Presbyterian church since 1892. INIr. Gerard has given his 
political allegiance to the prohibition party and is a stanch advocate 
of the cause of temperance but now votes with the republican party. 
He belongs to the Fraternal Reserve Life Association but does not 
seek to figure prominently in lodge, club or political circles. He con- 
centrates his time upon his business affairs and occupies the old home- 
stead u])on which his father settled sixty years ago. It was a tract 
of timber land from which he had to clear away the trees in order to 
plant the fields. 



FRED E. FERRIS. 



About 1900 Fred E. Ferris purchased the farm on section 29, 
Osceola township, on which he now resides, having here a tract of land 
of one hundred and sixty-five and a half acres devoted to general farm- 
ing. This is the visible evidence of his life of well directed energy and 
tln-ift for he is a self-made man, Avho started in business life with 
nothing. Diligence and determination, however, have overcome the 
obstacles and difficulties in his jiath, and he has worked his way steadily 
upward. He was born about three-quarters of a mile south of his 
present home, on the same section, his natal day being February 2, 



86 HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 

1879. His father, George ]M. Ferris, was borii. at ^Yetllersiield, 
Ilenrv count}', Illinois, and after attaining his majority lie married 
Orethusa Stephens, whose birth occm'red near Peoria, Illinois. They 
Mere residing in Stark county at the time of their marriage and settled 
three-quarters of a mile south of the present home of Fred E. Ferris, 
continuhig residents of this county until called to their tinal rest. 

The father died when his son, Fred, was a lad of but fourteen 
years. The latter was educated in the common schools and was reared 
u])(m the old home farm. Early undertaking the task of plowing and 
cldti^'ating the land and producing the crops, there soon came to him 
a knowledge of the value of industry and perseverance, and he used 
these qualities to enable him to gain a financial start. Fifteen years 
ago he purchased his land on section 29, Osceola township, and is 
today owner of an excellent farm property of one hundred and sixty- 
five and a half acres, which he has brought to a high state of cultiva- 
tion. He carries on general agricultural pvu'suits, and from the time 
of early sjaring planting until crops are harvested in the late autmnn 
he is busy in the fields, doing everything possible to advance his work 
and secure good harvests. 

In 1906 ]Mr. Ferris was married to jNIiss Agnes E. Scott, a daugh- 
ter of Robert Scott of Osceola township, and their children are now 
five in number: Glenn S., INIary A., Floyd J., Leslie A., and Ross E., 
all at home. ]Mrs. Ferris is a member of the Presbyterian church. 

]Mr. Ferris gives his political indorsement to the democratic party 
and its principles, and, while he does not seek nor desire political 
office, he has served for seven years as school director, doing all in his 
power to further the interests of public education in his neighborhood. 
He has always lived in the locality where he now resides, and his life 
record is familiar to his fellow townsmen. That his has been an up- 
right and honorable course is indicated in the fact that among his 
stanchest friends are those who have known him fi-om his boyhood 
days to the present. 



HARRY F. ADA:MS 



Harry F. Adams, living on section 16, Penn township, was born 
on an adjoining farm February 1.). 187'5. a son -of Robert A. and 
]Mary E. (Earhart) xVdams, the former a native of Pennsylvania and 
tlie latter of Ohio. Tliey were married, however, in Stark county, 
Illinois, the father having accompanied his parents on their removal 




HAERY F. ADAMS 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSnV OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



i 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 89 

to this state, where the family developed a farm, the grandparents 
there sjiending their remaining days. The father, reared to the occu- 
pation of farming, continued to follow that pursuit and was for a long 
period numbered among the rejiresentative agriculturists of his dis- 
trict. He passed away four years ago and his widow dietl early in the 
year 1916. They were both consistent members of the JMethodist 
Protestant church and assisted in building the fii'st house of worship 
for that denomination in their locality. 

Harry F. Adams was educated in the common schools of Penn 
townshijj and afterward went to Davenport, Iowa, where he pursued 
a business course. He then returned home and took up the occupation 
of farming and also began the breeding of a large type of Poland 
China hogs about eleven years ago. He is today one of the two most 
extensive breeders in the county and places upon the market about 
one hundred and fifty breeders a year. He holds two semi-annual 
sales besides selling through mail orders and to private parties. The 
culls go to the Chicago market. ]Mr. Adams has long maintained a 
pi'ominent jiosition among the stockmen of Stark county, and in addi- 
tion to handling Poland China hogs is well known as a breeder of the 
Holstein Friesian cattle and Percheron horses and he also feeds cattle, 
hogs and sheep. His is an excellent farm property si^lendidly 
equipped. He has four hundred acres of land and cvdtivates the 
entire tract. He has i)\it up all the improvements upon the place and 
these are modern in construction, design and equipment. He has 
recently erected a wet mix concrete garage which is his own idea and 
is the only one in the county. It is a solid concrete with no breaks 
outside of the windows and doors, and the latter are of steel. This 
is an especially fine building and is a credit to the enterprise and 
ingenuity of the owner. There are three sets of improvements on the 
farm, which he calls the Penn Center Farm and which has become 
widely known through reputation owing to the fine stock which are 
shipped therefrom. 

In 1896 ^Nlr. xVdams was united in marriage to INIiss Clora Gleason, 
by whom he had five children, namely: Miriam, at home; Chester, who 
])assed away at the age of seven years; Ardis, Audrej' and IVIerlin, all 
at home. 

Mr. and ]Mrs. Adams are members of the Methodist Protestant 
church at Castleton and Mr. Adams is one of the trustees having in 
charge the church property. Politically he exercises his right of fran- 
chise in support of the men and measures of the re]niblican party and 
is interested in its growth and success. He has served for foin- years 
as assessor and for a number of years has lieen a member of the town- 



90 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

ship central committee, ^\■hiIe at the present time he is serving on the 
county central committee. In fraternal circles he is very prominent, 
being recognized as one of the leading members of the Odd Fellows 
lodge at Castleton, in which he has passed through all of the chairs, 
•while for twenty-one years he has been secretary. He is also identi- 
fied with the encampment at \Vyoming, and he and his wife have taken 
the Rebekah degree at Wyoming. He is likewise a member of the 
JNIodern Woodmen camp at Castleton, the JNIasonic lodge at \Vyo- 
ming. the Royal Arch chapter at ^Vyoming, tlie Kniglits Templar 
commandery at Kewanee and the ]Mystic Shrine at Peoria, while both 
he and his wife are identified with the Eastern Star chapter at 
Wyoming. His life exemplifies the beneficent si)irit of the craft and 
the higli purposes of all the fraternal orders with which he is connected. 
His entire career has been actuated by honorable principles, and those 
who know him recognize in him the sterling traits of character which 
in every land and clime awaken confidence and regard. In business 
circles he occupies a most prominent and commendable position, for he 
has at all times been actuated by the spirit of progress and improve- 
ment. He has equipped his buildings with electric light, bringing his 
circuit from Wyoming, seven miles distant. This is indicative of the 
spirit which actuates him in all his undertakings, and in his vocabulary 
there is no such word as fail, for he never stops short of successful 
fulfillment of a purpose. 



WILLIAM LEET. 



William Leet, who formerly owned what is now the Exchange 
Bank of Bradford and also had other important business interests, 
was recognized as a leading factor in the development of Stark county 
and one of its most prominent citizens. A native of Connecticut, his 
birtli occurred in Chester on the 20th of October. 1827. and his parents 
were Samuel W. and Anna Leet, both natives of that state. The 
ancestry has been traced back to one William Leete, who removed 
from England to America in 1039, settling in tlie New Haven colony, 
of which he subsecjuently became governor. Following the union of 
that colony with the colony of Connecticut he was again chosen gov- 
ernor and was filling that liigh office at the time of his death in 1683. 
Charles Leet, a lirother of our subject was the first inventor of the 
first successful cartridge, his factory being in Connecticut. 

As the familv was in very limited circumstances, William I^eet 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 91 

of this review went to live with a jNIr. Jones, of Chester, Connecticut, 
working for his board and lodging. In 18-11 he accompanied his em- 
ployer to Illinois and remained with him upon a farm near Elmwood, 
Trivoli township, Peoria county, for four or five years, but at the 
end of that time, not being treated kindly, he left and began working 
for others. As soon as he had saved enougli money he returned to 
the east, but found himself dissatistieil witii New Kngland and in a 
comjjaratively short time again came to Illinois. For some time he 
\\orked for a farmer in Bureau county for a wage of ten dollars per 
month. He lived very economically and at length was able to pur- 
chase his first land, an eighty acre tract in Milo township, that county. 
Subsequently he sold that j^rojierty and bought three hundred and 
twenty acres on section 33, on which he took up his residence. He was 
\'ery successfvd in his farming operations and soon extended his activi- 
ties to other lines and at the time of liis marriage in 18.54 was worth 
about twenty thousand dollars and was considered wealthy. He saw 
still greater opportunities before him, however, and continued in the 
develoi)ment of his various interests. He possessed a great deal of 
mental and physical energy and was a very hard worker. He recog- 
nized, however, that inefficient effort was effort wasted and therefore 
planned all of his work carefully so as to secure the greatest possible 
results. He was quick to recognize a business opportunity and promjit 
in carrying out his plans. A number of years before the Civil war he 
erected an elevator in Henry, jNIarshall county, and for a considerable 
period Ijought and shipped grain. His farm was twenty miles distant, 
but in order to give personal attention to the elevator business he drove 
back and forth each day. Following the close of the war he trans- 
ferred his grain interests to Bradford and in 1873 he took up his 
residence in the town, wliere he continued to live until liis demise. For 
a considerable period he not only controlled the grain market at Brad- 
ford but also at Castleton, Duncan and Lombardville, all on the Chi- 
cago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. He was endowed with unusual 
keenness of insight and sagacity; possessed an imusually retentive 
memory and was able to hold in mind the details of every one of his 
almost countless business transactions. 

In 1872 jNIr. Leet became a factor in local banking circles, pur- 
chasing what is now tlie Bradford Exchange Bank, which was then 
conducted by A. B. INIiner. ]Mr. Leet proved as successful in the 
management of that institution as he had in the conduct of his other 
i)usiness affairs and its j)atronage grew steadilj-. He gave his first 
care to safeguarding the interests of depositors but was willing to 
extend credit when satisfied that the securitv offered was good. In 



92 HlSTOllY OF STARK COUNTY 

time hi.s interests were extended to otlier states, especially to Iowa, 
and he established a bank at Audubon, which also proved a profitable 
venture. He secured his start in business from his farming operations 
and never ceased to believe in the value of real estate as an investment 
and at one time owned nearly five thousand acres of land in Stark 
county besides valuable holdings elsewhere. He bought and sold land 
throughout his business career and was recognized as an authority on 
real estate values. In his dealings with others he was not only up- 
right and above board, but he was even liberal, never being known to 
foreclose a mortgage if he could avoid doing so and being at all times 
willing to give time to his debtors as long as he believed that thej' Avere 
trying to pay. There are many in the county who owe much to him 
and a wealthy man in Osceola township recently remarked that all 
that he had was due to William Leet, as he came to this county a poor 
man and could not have inu-chased his first farm if IMr. Leet had not 
loaned him money. 

At quite an early stage in his career Mr. Leet began to operate 
on the Chicago Board of Trade and in 1888 removed to Chicago, 
where he lived for two years. He tlien took up his residence in xVurora 
but continued a member of the Board of Trade, going to Chicago 
each day. He passed away in Aiu'ora on the 5th of September, 1896. 

On the 29th of August, 1854, INIr. Leet was united in marriage 
to JNIiss Helen Spear, who was a native of England but was brought 
to the United States in infancy by her parents. Her mothei- dying a 
few months after the arrival of the family in the United States, she 
was adopted by a IMr. and Mrs. Wilcox, who reared her to woman- 
hood and who removed to Stark County in the spring of 1854, taking 
up their residence upon rented land belonging to Mr. I^eet. To this 
union were born eight children, of whom three died in infancy. jMary 
J. gave her hand in marriage to Rev. J. C. Stoughton and is now 
living in Bradford. Her husband, who is deceased, was a prominent 
minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church and was instrumental 
in the establishment of the State University at Champaign and also 
of the Jennings Seminary of Aurora. Frank jM. is deceased. Rosa, 
the wife of Robert Thompson, of Bradford, is the president of the 
Bradford Exchange Bank. Further mention of her husband is made 
elsewhere in this work. Anna Ij. became the wife of Asmus Boyson 
but is now deceased. George Keller is residing in Aurora, Illinois. 

INIr. Leet was a republican but was never active in ])()litics, his 
business interests requiring his undivided attention. He was in sym- 
pathy with the INIethodist P]ii)iscopal church, although not a member, 
and his influence was given on the side of right and justice. Although 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 93 

it may not have been generally recognized, he did mnch to maintain a 
liigli standard of business honor in the communities in which he was 
active and in all of his dealings he was scrupulously honest. Frater- 
nally he belonged to the JNIasonic order for a number of years but at 
length deniitted. He had practically no educational opportunities, 
l)ut his native intelligence was so keen, his judgment of human nature 
so sound, and his force of character so great that in spite of obstacles 
he became one of the dominant factors in business circles in this part 
of the state. He left a considerable fortune, which, in accordance Avitli 
his wish, remained intact until after his widow's death, when it was 
divided among the several heirs. His position in a matter was never 
an equivocal one, as he was positive in his opinions and also in his 
jiersonal likes and dislikes. He held friendship inviolable and was 
willing to do nnich in behalf of a friend, but to an enemy he gave 
only the severest justice. Those to whom he gave his friendship knew 
him as a man of warm heart and deep loyalty, and all who came in 
contact with him held him in the highest respect. 



CHESTER B. CLAYBAUGH. 

There are few residents of Toulon better known than Chester B. 
Claybaugh, and wherever he is known he is spoken of in terms of high 
regard, for he has those sterling traits of character which in every 
land and clime awaken confidence and respect. He has made his 
home in Toulon continuously since 1870 and for four consecutive 
terms or for sixteen years has filled the ])osition of postmaster. He 
was born in McDonough comity, Illinois, January 31, 18.59, a son 
of Nicholas Claybaugh, a native of Ohio, who on removing westward 
to Illinois settled in ]McDonough county, Avhere he followed farming. 
He was there married to jNIiss Rhoda Belle IMarr, a native of Ten- 
nessee, from which state she came to Illinois. j\Ir. Claybaugh fol- 
lowed farming in Henry county for twenty years and afterward in 
Stark county but spent his last days in honorable retirement from 
business as a resident of Toulon, where his death occurred in 1900. 
His widow still survives and yet makes her home in Toulon. 

Chester B. Claybaugh was reared in Stark county and was edu- 
cated in Wethersfield and Kewanee, Illinois. Taking up the occupa- 
tion of farming, he devoted fifteen years to tilling the soil in Goshen 
township. Stark county, and afterwaixl turned his attention to the 
painting business in Toulon, following that pursuit for several years. 



94 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

Subsequently he bought a restaurant and confectionery store, which 
he conducted successfully for a number of years, after which he was 
appointed postmaster by President McKinley and by reappointment 
continued in that office for sixteen years. He discharged the duties 
of the position in a most capable, prompt and systematic manner, his 
work receiving the unqualified indorsement of his fellow townsmen. 
He was also a member of the village council for one term. His political 
allegiance has always been given to the republican party and he is 
one of its recognized leaders in this county, his opinions carrying- 
weight in its local councils. He has frequently been a delegate to the 
county, congressional and state conventions. 

In 1891, in Toulon, JNIr. Claj^baugh was married to JNIiss ]May C. 
Smith, A\'ho was here born and reared and who by her marriage has 
become the mother of four children: Irene, the wife of Clarence L. 
]NJahaney, a farmer of West Jersey tow^nship; Leslie D. and Philip 
C, who for more than a year have been conducting the moving picture 
house of Toulon, which is owned by their father ; and Polly, who is a 
student in the high school. 

After his retirement from the office of postmaster ]Mr. Claybaugh 
established a grocery and meat market in Toulon and is still carrying 
on the business with gratifying success. In his store is always to be 
found an excellent line of staple and fancy groceries and fresh and 
salt meats. He has built up a very gratifying trade and is regarded 
as one of the successful business men of the county. It is character- 
istic of him that he carries forward to profitable completion whatever 
he undertakes. His business methods are straightforward and his 
enterprise has enabled him to overcome all difficulties and obstacles 
and work his way steadily upward. He is pleasant and genial in man- 
ner and the good things said of him by his fellow townsmen indicate 
that he has a very extensive circle of warm friends. 



J 



FRANK C. ISIcCLENAHAN, D. D. S. 

In professional circles in Toulon, Dr. Frank C. INIcClenahan 
occupies an enviable position, having been here engaged in the i)rac- 
tice of dentistry for eleven years. He utilizes the most improved 
scientific methods in his work and the results which he has accomplished 
have been most satisfactory. He is a native son of the county, his 
birtli having occm-red in Goshen township, near La Fayette, in De- 
cember, 1879. His paternal grandfather, Henry ]McClenahan. a 



HISTORY OF STARK COLXTY 95 

native of Pendleton connty, Kentucky, was horn in 1798 and re- 
moved thence to Inchana, while in the early '30s he became a resident 
of Stark county, Illinois, where he joined his father, Elijah jNIc- 
Clenahan, Sr., who was among the first settlers to penetrate into the 
Avild western wilderness that is now the thickly populated and pros- 
perous district of Stark county. The first election lield in the county 
was held at his residence in Goshen township. 

His grandson and namesake, Elijah ^NlcClenahan, Jr., the father 
of Dr. iNIcClenahan, was born in Rush county, Indiana, July 10, 
18'i7. and came to Stark county in 1834. when a lad of seven years, 
with his father, Henry ^IcClenahan. Here he was reared amid the 
usual pioneer conditions, meeting all of the hardships and experiences 
of frontier life. In 1873 he married Miss ]\Iargaret Thomas, a daugh- 
tei- of William ^I. Thomas, of Knox comity, Illinois. He began farm- 
ing in Goshen township, about two miles south of La Fayette, and 
there he reared his family and spent his remaining days. He was a 
very active and became a very prosperous agriculturist and at the time 
of his death owned five hundred acres of very valuable land in two 
farms. Perseverance and indefatigable eff'ort were the basic elements 
of his growing success, while in all of his business dealings he was 
strictly reliable. He belonged to La Fayette Lodge, No. 501, F. & 
A. 31.. and consistently exemplified in his life the beneficent spirit of 
the craft. He died February 2, 1909, at the age of eighty-two years, 
and is still survived by his widow. In their family were five children: 
Edna D., who is living ^vith her mother in Toulon; Daniel H., who 
for some years has been an active member of the bar at Lincoln, Ne- 
braska; Carl D., who is a druggist of Toulon; Frank C; and Bert C, 
who is living on the old homestead farm near I^a Fayette. 

Dr. Frank C. JNIcClenahan was reared in this county and com- 
pleted his public school education in the high school of La Faj'ette, 
while his professional training was received in the Northwestern 
Dental College at Chicago, in which he completed a three years' course. 
He was there graduated with the class of 190-4. On the .5th of ]May 
of that year he opened an ofi^ce in Toulon, where he has since engaged 
in practice. He has the marked mechanical skill and ingenuity' so 
necessary to the dentist, combined with the business ability which must 
always prove a factor in the successful management of one's own 
aff'airs. His office is thoroughly e(juij)j)ed with tlie modern appliances 
of dentistry and his work is an embodiment of scientific knowledge 
and investigation. 

On the 22d of Deceml)er. 1903. Dr. McClenahan was married in 
Toulon to JNIiss Lucile Blanche Cary. a native of Ionia, ]Michigan, 



96 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

and a daughter of the Rev. E. A. Cary, a minister of the Christian 
church. They occujjy a pleasant and attractive residence in Toidon 
and both are active members in the Christian church, which was found- 
ed by Elijah ]McClenahan and his wife, the former a brother of Henry 
McClenahan and an uncle of Alec ^McClenahan, Jr. The family have 
always been prominent in the church work here and their labors have 
been an important element in bringing about moral progress in the 
community. 



DAXIEL B. PHEXIX. 

Daniel B. Phenix Mas a pioneer of Stark county and his demise 
on the 28th of January, 1913, was deeply regretted throughout the 
county. He passed his last years at the home of his son, Bardwell D. 
Phenix, in Bradford, and enjoyed a period of leisure made possible 
by his former well directed industry. He Avas vice president of the 
Phenix Banking Company and was also connected with other phases 
of the development of his locality. His birth occurred on the 28th of 
June, 1820, and his parents were John T. and Lydia (Daniels) Phe- 
nix, who are mentioned more fully in the sketch of his brother, Har- 
mon Phenix. In the spring of 1834 he came to Stark county with 
liis mother and brotliers and sisters, the father having previously 
removed to this county. For some time Daniel B. Phenix concen- 
trated his energies upon the work of the home farm. Following his 
marriage he purchased eighty acres of raw land and at once began its 
cultivation and improvement. For four or live years he engaged in 
farming and stockraising tliere but at the end of that time purcliased 
a farm in Penn township, on which he resided for about sixty years, 
remaining there until two years before his death, A\hen he took up 
liis residence Avith his son Bardwell in Bradford. He met with grati- 
fying success in all that he undertook, and he and his wife at one time 
owned about fourteen hundred acres of fine land. He and his brother 
Abram were extensively engaged in the threshing business for about 
nineteen years, owning in that time twenty-one different machines. 
.They operated not only in this county but in adjoining counties and 
found this venture very profitable. In addition to these extensive 
interests Daniel B. Phenix was vice president and a large stockholder 
in the Phenix Banking Company, one of the well known financial 
institutions of the county. 

3Ir. Phenix was married in February, 1853, to 3Iiss Jane A. 



( fnnmv 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 
URBANA 



\ ^i^^ 




¥^ 




DANIEL B. PHEXJX 



y,^*^-*^^^ 



••f^ 




MRS. JANE A. PHENIX 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBAWA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 99 

Moore, who was born in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, and removed 
to Stark county, Illinois, Avhen about thirteen years of age. She 
passed away in 1907, in the faith of the Baptist church, when she had 
reached the advanced age of eighty-one years. To them were l)orn 
four children: Bardwell D., a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in 
this work; ^Villianl H., of Bradford; and two who died in infancy. 
Mr. Phenix indorsed the principles of the republican party and 
took an active part in promoting its success. He contributed finan- 
cially to campaign funds and did all in his power to promote the inter- 
ests of his party. His public spirit was also shown by his presenting 
the town of Bradford with a flagpole and when that became unsightly 
he erected a new one. He possessed a vigorous constitution and a 
strong mind and was active until a very short time before his death, 
doing some carpenter work in the summer and fall of 1912. He went 
up town to talk with his friends Avithin three weeks of his death, which 
occurred on the 28th of January, 1913, when he had reached the ad- 
vanced age of ninety-three years. Practically afll of those who had a 
part in reclaiming this county from the wilderness have now passed to 
their reward but their names are still remembered and they are held 
in the high honor which is their due. 



F. T. GELVIN. 



F. T. Gelvin has for a decade been engaged in the grain trade at 
La Fayette and the close application and energy which he displays 
in the conduct of his business affairs are bringing him deserved suc- 
cess. That Stark County offers many opportunities to its citizens is 
indicated in the fact that many of her native sons have remained within 
her borders after attaining adult age. iVmong this number is Mr. 
(ielvin, who was born in Essex Townshij), December 5, 1877- 

His father, James R. Gelvin, was born near Erie, Pennsylvania, 
November 4, 1836, and was there reared, being a young man of nine- 
teen years when in 18.55 he left the Keystone state and made his way 
westward to Illinois. He remained a resident of Stark County until 
18()1, when he felt that his duty to his country was paramount to all 
else and offered his services to the government in defense of the Union, 
joining Company F, One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois Volunteer 
Infantry, with which he served until finally discharged at the close 
of the war, being mustered out at Springfield, in September. 180.5. 
He was a brave and loyal soldier, never faltering in the performance 



100 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

of any duty and participating in a number of very important engao'e- 
ments, including the battles of Nashville, Chattanooga and Lookout 
]\Iountain. He returned to his home with a most creditable military 
record, characterized by loyalty to the old flag and by the prompt and 
faithful performance of every task, no matter how arduous, tliat 
devolved upon him in connection with his military service. Following 
his return home he was married in Stark County, in the fall of 18()j, 
to JNIiss Martha Trickle, who was born and reared in this county. 
Mr. Gelvin purchased land in Essex Township and transformed the 
wild sod into productive fields. He fenced his place, erected build- 
ings thereon and converted the land into a very productive and valu- 
able farm. He also extended the boundaries of his place from time 
to time until he became the owner of two lumdred and forty acres, 
from which he derived a substantial annual income in the shape of 
large crops. Upon that place he resided until his death, which occurred 
in August, 190.5, and liis widow still makes her home upon the farm. 
He was a devoted member of W. W. Wright Post, G. A. R., and 
thus maintained jileasant relations Avith his old army conn^ades. 

F. T. Gelvin is one of a family of two sons, his brother l)eing 
Merle Gelvin, who is married and follows farming in Essex To\\n- 
shi]). F. T. Gelvin was reared on the old homestead and had the 
usual experiences of the farm bred boy M'ho divides his time betAveen 
work in the fields and the acquirement of an education in the district 
schools. ^Vhen his textbooks were put aside he continued to assist 
his father in the develoi^ment of the home place until he readied his 
majority. In 1906 he tvnnied his attention to the grain trade, pur- 
chasing an elevator in La Fayette, and since that time he has been 
well known among the grain mercliants of this part of the county. 
He also handles tile and has built up a good trade in that connection. 
He shijis grain almost daily throughout the year, handling many 
carloads annually. Diligence and determination have been the basic 
elements of his success, and in all his business relations he is found 
reliable as well as progressive. 

On the -iSth of February, 1900, in Atkinson, Illinois, ]Mr. Gelvin 
was married to ISliss Lola AI. Green, who was born and reared in 
Atkinson and was there educated. Of this marriage there is one 
daughter, Velmya Irene, who is now a student in the public schools. 
The family home is an attractive residence in La Fayette, which ]Mr. 
Gelvin jjurchased. 

In politics he is identified with the republican party, and in Essex 
Township he served as collector for one term. Since 1909 he has 
served as secretarv of the La Favette Fair Association. He was 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY lOl 

scliool treasurer of Goshen Township for four years and township 
clerk for two years. He has never heen neglectful of his duties of 
citizenship and in a private capacity has manifested the same spirit 
of loyalty to his country and her best interests that his father displayed 
when on southern battlefields. INIr. Gelvin belongs to the ^Masonic 
Lodge at La Fayette, of which he has served as secretary for some 
years, and he and his wife are members of the Eastern Star. Both are 
loyal to the high teachings and purposes of the order, and they are 
ever ready to extend a helping hand where aid is needed. Those who 
ktioAv them entertain for them warm regard, and they have an extensive 
circle of friends in their part of the county. 



WILLIAM U. SICKLES. 

No history of the commercial development and activity of Tou- 
lon would be complete were there failure to make reference to the 
record of William U. Sickles, who for thirty-eight years has been 
engaged in merchandising here and who enjoys in full measure the 
warm regard and confidence of his fellow townsmen^ He was born 
in JMarshall county, Illinois, September 24. 1861, a son of William 
Sickles, a native of New York. The fathei- was there reared but in 
early manhood removed westward and settled in ^Marshall county, 
Illinois, accompany his father, Christopher Sickles, who was one of 
the pioneers of that region. William Sickles was married in that 
county to Abigail Freeman, a native of Dutchess county, New York, 
born near Poughkeepsie. Her father was a native of England, while 
her mother came of Scotch lineage. Following his marriage INIr. 
Sickles was actively engaged in farming in Marshall county and be- 
came the owner of two excellent tracts of land there. Upon the old 
homestead he reared his family but afterward removed to Wyoming, 
\vhere he engaged in the grocery business for a short time. He met 
an accidental death, being struck by lightning in 1893. His wife sur- 
vived him for more than two decades, passing away in the spring of 
1014. 

^Villiam U. Sickles was reared in this state, largely acquiring his 
education in the schools of Wyoming, although his opportunities in 
that direction were somewhat limited. When a youth of sixteen years 
he began providing for his own support by clerking in a store in Tou- 
lon and was employed in that manner for several years. In 1881 he 
removed to Peoria, where he became clerk in a wholesale dry goods 



102 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

house, but after a year he removed to Toulon and for about tN\elve 
months was a clerk in the grocery house of \Villiam F. Cox. Subse- 
quently he spent several years in the employ of Starrett Brothers 
and in 1907 he embarked in business on his own account, opening a 
general store in which he carries dry goods, groceries, boots and shoes. 
He has built up a very gratifying trade and is regarded as one of the 
progressive merchants of the city. 

On the 13th of December, 1883, INIr. Sickles was married to Miss 
Julianette Rhodes, a daughter of Charles Rhodes, who was one of the 
first settlers of this county and is now a well preserved man of eighty- 
two years yet living in Toulon. In the family are four children: 
Gertrude E., the wife of George Fell, a farmer living near Lamonte, 
in Pettis county, ^Missouri; Edith, the wife of Ray Sweat, a farmer 
of Peoria county: Charles R.. who is opening up a new farm at 
Walker, 3Iinnesota; Frank L., who is his father's assistant in busi- 
ness and wdio in April, 191.5, married INIiss ]Mabel Stanley, who was 
born and reared in the town of Wyoming. 

Politically ]Mr. Sickles is an earnest republican and has filled the 
offices of alderman and city treasurer. lie served as a delegate to 
county conventions and is recognized as one of the party leaders in 
this section of the state. In Masonic circles he has taken the degrees 
of blue lodge and chapter and is in thorough sympathy with the teach- 
ings of the order, wliich has as its basic principle a recognition of the 
brotherhood of mankind. He is one of the active and helpful mem- 
bers of the Congregational Church, as is his wife, who is also an earnest 
Sunday school worker. Both are widely esteemed in the comnnuiity 
and jNIr. Sickles, both as a business man and citizen, enjoys the con- 
fidence and ooodwill of those with whom he lias lieen brought in 
contact. 



WALTER B. BALLEXTIXE. 

Walter B. Ballentine, one of the active and progressive business 
men of Stark county, is engaged in dealing in coal and ice in Toulon, 
having there been connected with this line of trade for three years. 
He Mas born in Peoria county, Illinois, February 16, 18(»3. and is a 
son of James D. Ballentine, who w-as l)()i'n in (iuilfoid county. Xortli 
Carolina, and was reared in the south. \Vlien a young man he came 
to Illinois, settling first in Peoria. He was three times married, his 
first wife being I^ucinda Edwards, who died leaving six children. 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY lo;J 

P\)r his second wife he chose IMrs. ]Mar<?aTet Jolinson. who by her 
former marriage liad three cliildren and by this iimOn tliere were born 
two sons and two danghters. For his third wife iSIr. Balhvntine chose 
3Irs. Rhoda (Walters) Reed, a native of Connecticut, wdiose father 
was one of the pioneer settlers of Illinois, coming to this state from 
Connecticut. By her first marriage the third wife had one child and 
after becoming ]Mrs. Ballentine she had two sons and a daughter, the 
daughter being IVIrs. W. F. Templeton, of JNIinneapolis. INIr. Ballen- 
tine purchased land in Stark county, near Wyoming, and built upon 
and improved his farm, making it a valuable ])roperty. He lost his 
last \\'ife while living upon the farm and afterward spent two or three 
years at the home of a daughter in Iowa, reaching the very venerable 
age of ninety-seven. 

Walter B. Ballentine was reared upon the home farm and attended 
the (listi'ict schools and also the schools of Wyoming. He was the 
youngest child and remained with his father, whom he assisted in his 
youth, while later he took charge of the old home place, which he still 
owns. It comprises three hundred and thirty-foiu' acres of good land, 
over half of which is under cultivation. There is a splendid vein of 
coal eighty feet below the surface and JMr. Ballentine opened up this 
vein, finding the coal running from four and one-half to five and one- 
half feet in thickness and of good quality. He has a steam hoist for 
the coal, and has been operating his mines for eleven years. On 
removing to Toulon, however, he leased the mines and here he pur- 
chased an estabhshed coal l)usiness. Later he built coal sheds and an 
ice house, thoroughly equipped, motor power l)eing used in imloading. 
He can unload an entire car in from one to two hours. Next to the 
coal house he put uj) an ice house, and built a spin- of railroad track to 
facilitate shipping. He ships in Rock River ice, and he finds an 
excellent sale for the product. In fact both branches of his business 
are proving profitable because of his excellent management and the 
honesty with which he conducts all business transactions. 

\Vhile upon the farm ^Ir. Ballentine was married October 20, 
1001, to ]Mrs. M. E. Butler nee Templeton, whose first husband was 
the owner and editor of the News. By that marriage she had a daugh- 
ter, Edna B., the wife of Frank Caverly. 

In ])olitics ]Mr. Ballentine is a republican and has served as super- 
visor of Toulon township for two terms, also as township collector and 
as a delegate to county conventions. However, he concentrates his 
energies upon his business, which is capably managed and controlled 
and is bringing to him gratifying success. His determination and 
even-paced energy have carried him into important business relations 



104 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

and he has ever recognized the fact tliat snecess is not a matter of 
genius, as held hy some, but is rather the outcome of clear jutlgment 
and exiDerience. 



BYROX SMITH. 



Byron Smith was born July 28. 18.51, on the farm on Avhich he now 
resides on section 31, Osceola township. He has lived in the county 
for sixty-five years, and is a representative of one of its old and 
respected pioneer families. His parents, Asher ]M. and PhQel)e 
(Stark) Smith, were natives of Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, where 
they were reared and mari'ied. In the year 183.5 they came west to 
Illinois, settling at lA'yoming, this state, where they sj^ent the winter, 
after which they took up their abode upon the tract of land on which 
their son Byron now resides. The father homesteaded this farm, and 
Byron Smith still has the original sheep skin deed, Avhich shows the 
father's title to the property. He arrived in Illinois only three years 
after the Black Hawk war, which estal)lished the supremacy of the 
white man as rulers of these broad prairies. There were no railroads 
in the state, and the Avork of improvement and progress seemed 
scarcely begun. Chicago had not then been incorporated as a city, and 
many of the now thriving and populous towns, cities and villages had 
not then been founded. For a third of a century Asher ]M. Smith 
continued to reside upon his farm, there passing away in 18G9. when 
he M'as laid to rest in the Smith cemetery, estalilished on land Avhich he 
had given for that piu'pose. He was a tanner by trade, following that 
pursuit in the east, and after his removal to the west he started a 
tannery but on account of the water which he had to use the Avork did 
not prove successful, and he then turned his attention to general farm- 
ing, which he continued up to the time his life's lal)ors Avere ended. 
His fellow townsmen appreciated his Avorth and ability, and frequently 
called him to serve in public positions. He occupied a number of 
toAvushi]) offices, including that of collector, Avhile for seven terms he 
Avas assessor. His widoAv continued her residence on the old homestead, 
until 1881, AA'hen she Avas laid by the side of her husband in Smitli 
cemetery. 

At the usual age Byron Smith began his education in the district 
.schools, and later he sjient one term as a student in the jNIichigan 
University at Ann Arbor, but he is largely a self-educated as well as a 
self-made man. He took over the Inisiness of his father when the latter 



I 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 105 

(lied, being at that time a young man of eighteen years, and lie has 
since given his attention to general agricultural pursuits, his labois 
being attended with excellent results. He has made all of the 
improvements u])on the farm, save the building of the house. Here 
he has erected fine barns and a large silo, and he has the latest impro\ed 
machinery to facilitate the work of the fields. He also raises high 
grade stock, and its sale brings to him a gratifying financial income. 
His place comprises three hundred and eight acres of land, and is one 
of the valuable properties of the county. 

I'olitically INIr. Smith is a republican. For twentj^ j^ears he has 
served as school director and for two terms was school trustee. He 
has no lodge connections, but he attends and supports the Methodist 
Episcopal church, and he is interested in all those forces which work 
for the development and improvement of the county along material, 
political and moral lines. 



WILLIAM HOLGATE. 

AVilliam Holgate was formerly active in various lines of business, 
and as all of his undertakings proved profitable he gained financial 
independence and is now living retired in Wyoming. His birth 
occurred in Penn township. Stark county, April 15, 1844, and he is a 
son of James Holgate, a sketch of whom ajjpears elsewhere in this 
Avork. Our subject was reared upon the family homestead and entered 
the district schools at the usual age, attending for six months a year 
until he was twelve years old and for three months a year until he was 
seventeen years of age. 

On the 12th of August, 1862, when little more than eighteen years 
old, Mr. Holgate enlisted in Comi^any E, One Hundred and Twelfth 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel T. J. Henderson, and 
went to the front with that command. He was wounded in the 
shoulder at Atlanta and was in a hospital for four months. He was 
also held a prisoner at Belle Island for five months, but during the 
rest of the time was with his company and participated in the battles 
in Avhich his regiment engaged. He Avas mustered out on the 1.5th 
of July. 180.5, and was honorably discharged at Chicago and then 
returned to Stark county, where he engaged in farming on his own 
account, owning two hundred and seventy-five acres in Penn town- 
ship. In 1870 he bought out a private bank in old Wyoming, nation- 
alized the institution and served as its president until the charter was 



106 HISTORY OF STARK COUNT V 

"•iven up. He has been president of five different banks and has never 
held any other position in any of them. For seventeen years he con- 
ducted a furniture and undertaking business in ^Vyoniing and [jroved 
as successful as a merchant as he had as a farmer and financier. 
Although he has now retired from active life he still owns nine hundred 
and sixty acres of land in Kansas and derives a handsome income from 
that investment. 

INIr. Holgate was imited in marriage to JMiss Charlotte A. Kis- 
singer, who was born in Pennsylvania in 184.5 and is a daugliter of 
Alexander and Xancy (Snare) Kissinger, natives of JNlartinsburg, 
Pennsylvania. 

Her father followed the tailor's trade in early manhood, but in 
1847 came to Stark county, Illinois, and acquired title to two hundred 
and forty acres of land in Penn township, which he cultivated until 
called by death. His wife is also deceased. ]Mr. and JNIrs. Holgate 
have two daughters: Carrie, the wife of Charles A. Smith, a merchant 
of Wyoming; and Cora, who married Lyman Graves, also a resident 
of Wyoming. There was a third daughter, Katie, who married 
M. A. Sparr, but who has passed away. 

JMr. Holgate has always been a stalwart republican and has done 
all in his power to advance the interests of that party although all the 
rest of the family have been democrats and he was reared in that 
political belief. He is well known throughout the county, and all who 
have had dealings with him recognize his ability and sound judgment. 
He is one of the leading citizens of ^Vyoming, and his home is one of 
the fine residences of the town. 



PETHUEL PARISH. 



Pethuel Parish, a retired farmer and stockman of Toulon, has 
resided in Stark county since 183G, or for a period of eighty years, 
and there are few indeed who have been connected with the county 
for so long a period. He was four years old Avhen his parents 
'removed here with their family, his birth having occurred on the 
5th of September, 1832, in Canada. His father. Squire Parish, and 
his mother, Sophia (Althouse) Parish, were both also born in that 
country, the former on the 12th of June, 1802, and the latter on the 
12th of June, 1815. On his removal to this county Squire Parish 
entered land from the government in what is now Goshen township 
and the pioneer conditions that then prevailed are indicated by the 



L.'SR/IRY 

UNIVERSIiy OF (LLirjois 

URBAm 




PETHUEL PARISH 




iLRS. PKTHUKL I'AKISH 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY ill 

fact that the family lived in a log house for five years. Later a more 
commodious residence was erected and the farm was brought to a 
high state of development. The father died in Toulon on the 21st 
of December, 1862, but the mother survived for many years, passing 
away in Toulon in 1887. Both were sincere Christian people but 
were identified with different churches, the father being a Quaker 
and the mother a jNIethodist. To them Avere born ten children : 
Pethuel; Sarah, the deceased wife of James Stimson; Hiram, de- 
ceased, who was a soldier in the One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry in the Civil war; Peter, deceased; Cynthia, who 
first mai-ried George ]Maxfield, a Union soldier, and follo^ving his 
demise married Josej^h Burns, a resident of Fairmont, Nebraska; 
Hapijy, who became the wife of George Dugan and is living at Bed- 
ford. Iowa; Lucy, the deceased wife of Jonathan Cooley; Sophia, 
who married Dexter Maxfield, of Fairmont; Squire, deceased; and 
Rulof. 

Pethuel Parish grew to manhood upon the home farm in this 
county and received a limited education in an old log schoolhouse. 
His father Mas a cripple and not able to do the heavy farm work, 
and, the family being in moderate circumstances, our subject had to 
go to Mork when but a boy. He remained with his parents, giving 
them the benefit of his labors, until he Mas twenty-three years of 
age, when he was married and rented the homestead, his parents 
removing to Toulon. Subsequently he bought the place. Mhich com- 
prised eighty acres, and not long afterward purchased another eighty- 
acre ti'act. His long and thorough training in farm work as a boy 
well qualified him to follow agricultural pvu-suits independently and 
he seldom failed to receive a good income from his land. As time 
passed he increased his holdings and today owns eight hundred and 
forty acres in Goshen township. For manj'^ years he dealt extensively 
in cattle, hogs and horses,' and he found stock raising a very profit- 
able phase of farming. About 1900 he retired from the active work 
of the fields, and removed to Toulon, where he has a comfortable, 
modern home. He still supervises the operation of his farm and 
when the weather is suitable sjiends much of his time upon his land. 
He is one of the wealthy men of the county, and his record shows 
M'hat may be accomplished by industry and good management, as he 
has made everything that he has himself. 

]Mr. Parish was married in 18.)4 to JNIiss Elizabeth Strayer. a 
native of Stephenson county, Illinois, who passed away, leaving a 
son. AVilliam H. He was born on the 16th of February, 1858, and 
is now a pi'osperous farmer of this county. INIr. Parish Mas married 



112 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

a second time, JNIiss Celestia Ferris becoming his wife on the 4th of 
February, 1862. She was born in Canada in 1842, a daughter of 
Elijah and Lydia Ferris, who removed to Stark county in 18.5.5 but 
subsequently went to Iowa, where both passed away. Mrs. Parish 
has become the mother of ten children, namely: Lillie jVIay, who 
was born on the 14th of December, 1862, and died on the 17th of 
August, 1872; George F., who was born October 7, 1864, and died 
August 16, 1882; Bertha Ann, whose birth occurred on the 28th of 
September, 1866, and who married Otis Goodale, a resident of Chi- 
cago, and passed away on the 10th of ]March, 1893; Herman Everett, 
who was born on the 22d of August, 1868, and is living in California; 
Blanch Sophia, who was born on the 11th of Augtist, 1873, and gave 
her hand in marriage to John Leech, a farmer of Goshen township; 
Lizzie Ethelyn, who was born on the 18th of September. 1877, and 
married William Xelson. of La Fayette, Illinois; Lucy ]Maude. who 
is a twin of Lizzie, and gave her hand in marriage to George ^Vallace 
and is residing on her father's farm in Goshen township: Sarah 
Pearl, who was born on the 9th of November, 1878, and died in May, 
1892; Jessie Lenora, who was born on the 16th of October. 1882, 
and died on the 10th of December, 1894; and Bessie Laurena, who is 
a twin of Jessie and is at home. 

Mr. Parish supports the republican party at the polls l)ut has 
never aspired to office. Throughout his life he has been a tem- 
perate man and has never used either alcoholic liquors or tobacco. 
He has witnessed practically the entire development of the county 
from a frontier region to its present prosperous condition and has 
many interesting recollections of the early days. About 1840 Toulon 
was but a tiny settlement, the only building being a log blacksmith 
shop, one residence and a log building in which a man named Abel 
kept a saloon. The first settlers of the county cut grain with a cradle 
and threshed it with a flail or tramped it out on frozen ground and 
the nearest mill was many miles distant at a place called Utica. 
JNIoreover, the smut was at times so bad in the wheat that the bread 
Mould be black. Frequently wheat was so scarce that they had to 
use corn for making bread, and instead of taking it to the mill to 
be ground thej' often crushed it in homemade mortars. The mold- 
board of the first plow owned by our subject's father Mas made of 
black Avalnut, Mhich Mas at that time very plentiful throughout the 
county. For five seasons JNIr. Parish of this revicM^ broke prairie 
M'ith five yoke of oxen and a ploM' M'ith a ribbed moldboard. that is, 
one made of iron rods instead of a solid piece of metal, this method 
of construction being better adapted to breaking the tough sod. 



HISTORY OF STAllK COUNTY 113 

From boyhood until he retired at the age of sixty-eight years, he 
was actively connected with agricultural interests and he may well 
take pride in the part which he has played in the development of his 
township. The leisure which he has enjoj^ed for the past fifteen years 
is well deserved, and he is honored as one of the oldest residents and 
leading citizens of the county. 



PETER TERNNS. 



Peter Ternns, Avho for twelve years has been engaged in the buy- 
ing and shipping of live stock at Bradford, is a self-made man wlio 
had a very limited capital when he came to this city but in the interim, 
through his close api:)lication, his energy, determination and persistency, 
has built up a business of substantial and gratifying proportions. He 
was born in Prussia, Germany, December 10, 1846, a son of John 
and Anna ( Wegner) Ternns, who spent their entire lives in the father- 
land. 

It was in that country diu-ing his boyhood days that Peter Ternns 
acquired a good education and inlSGT, when twenty j'ears of age, he 
started for America, bidding adieu to friends and native country with 
the hoj^e of finding better business conditions in the new world. For 
a year he resided on Long Island and then made his way into the 
interior of the country, settling in jNIarshall Comity, Illinois, where 
he resided from 1868 until 1894. During that period he lived upon a 
farm in La Prairie Townshi]). concentrating his energies upon general 
agricultural pin-suits, his labors resulting in the harvesting of good 
crops owing to the provident care with which he prepared and cul- 
tivated the fields. In the year mentioned, however, he removed to 
jNIilo Townsliip. Bureau County, where in addition to general farm- 
ing he carried on stock feeding quite extensively. Thirteen years ago 
he came to Bradford and a year later began buying and shipping live 
stock, in which business he is still engaged, handling a large amount 
of stock annually. He is still the owner of two hundred and ninety- 
five acres of land in JNIilo Township and also has one himdred and 
twenty acres in ^Marshall Comity beside a (juarter section in Xorman 
County, ^Minnesota. His property interests also include a fine home in 
Bradford. All this is the visible evidence of his life of well directed 
energy and thrift, for he came to the United States empty-handed and 
has worked his way upward thi'ough energy, perseverance and deter- 
mination. 



lU HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

In 1872 ;Mr. Ternns was united in marriage to ^liss Katie Schniitt, 
who was born in Peoria County, Illinois, and they have become the 
parents of nine children: John, living at Coleman, South Dakota; 
Joseph, whose home is in Texas; Peter, living in 3Iayfield, Kansas; 
JVIaggie, the wife of 31artin Stembley of Stark County; Julia, the 
A\ife of Jess Hopkins, living in ]Milo Townsiiip, Bureau County; 
Anna, who is a trained nurse located in Rock Island, Illinois: Lizzie, 
at home; Amanda, who is engaged hi teachhig school; and Clarence, 
at home. 

]Mr. Ternns gives his political support to the democratic part}-, and 
for eight years he filled the office of village commissioner in Bradford, 
while for seven years he was assessor of Osceola Township, discharg- 
ing his public duties with promptness and fidelity. Both he and his 
wife are communicants of St. John's Catholic Church, to the support 
of which they contribute generously. ]Mr. Ternns has never had occa- 
sion to regret his determination to come to the new world, for here he 
has found the opportunities which he sought — opportunities which are 
open to all amliitious and energetic young men.. Step by step he has 
advanced financially, and his position is now a most gratifying one. 



GEORGE W. SPRIXGER. 

George W. Springer is now living retired in Toulon but for years 
w'ds one of the active, progressive and successful farmers of the 
county. He was born in this county ^Nlay 5, 1845, a son of George 
Springer, a native of Ohio, who in tliat state married Christina Fantz, 
a native of Gei-many. who was reared, liowever, in Ohio. After his 
marriage ]Mr. Springer followed farming in the Buckeye state for 
several years, but in 18-il left his old liome and drove across the coun- 
tiy with a team to Stark county, also bringing with him a cow. which 
seemed in such a liurry to reach this county that she jumped off the 
ferry at Peoria and swam across tlie Illinois river, reaching the oppo- 
site bank before the ferry. 3Ir. Springer settled in Essex townshii). 
wliere lie purchased some land, becoming owner of a i-a\\ tract of one 
hundred and sixty acres, but with characteristic energy he undertook 
the task of breaking the sod and tilling tlie fields. lie s])lit rails and 
fenced the entire place, brought his land under cultivation and erected 
thereon a good residence and substantial barns and outbuildings for 
the shelter of his stock. Upon that place lie reared his family and 
spent liis remaining days, liis wife surviving him for ten years. He 



HISTORY OF STARK COL XT V 115 

was one of the ori<'inal ineiiibers of the United Brethren ehnreh, of 
which he served as a trustee. His hfe was ever ii])right and honorable, 
and he left to his family not only a comfortable competence but also 
the priceless heritage of an untarnished name. His son, George W. 
Springer, was the foui-th in a family of six sons and a daughter, of 
whom one died in infancy, the others being Xoah, now of Toulon; 
^Michael, who in 18()2 joined Company E of the One Hundred and 
Twelfth Illinois Volunteer Infantry and was captured, his death 
occui-ring in Andersonville prison; Henry, who is now living retired 
in Princeville, Illinois; Kli/abeth. the wife of James Estep, also of 
Princeville; and David, a farmer residing near JMarshalltown, Iowa. 

George W. Springer spent his youthful days in the usual manner 
of farm lads, earh'' becoming familiar with the work of the fields, to 
which he devoted the summer months. He is largely a self-educated 
as well as a self-made man, for his opportunities of attending school 
were limited. He was married in Stark county, February 14, 18()!», 
to iNIiss Sarah J. Eckley, who was born and reared in this county and 
is a daughter of Josej^h Eckley, one of the pioneer settlers who came 
to this state from Ohio. ]Mr. Springer had up to that time remained 
upon his father's farm but following his mai-riage began farming on 
his own account in Peoria county, his father assisting him to purchase 
eighty acres of improved land upon which he lived for fourteen yeai-s. 
He made further improvements there, building a barn and otherwise 
adding to the value of the place. Subsequently he disposed of that 
l)roperty and invested in eighty-four acres of land in Essex township. 
Stark county, built a barn there and otherwise carried on the work of 
general improvement and development. He carefully tilled his fields, 
producing large cro])s, and his work was successfully carried on until 
100.5. when he rented the place and purchased a residence in Toulon, 
where he has since lived retired, enjoying a rest that he has truly 
earned and richly deserves. 

^Vhile living upon the farm ]Mr. Springer lost his first wife, who 
])assed away in 1902. Of the three children born of that marriage 
Charles died at the age of twenty-one years, and the youngest, jNIary 
E., died at the age of seventeen months. The surviving daughter is 
Edith Jane, the wife of C. W. Sherman, of Peoria. Mr. Springer was 
married in Burlington Junction. INIissovn-i, September 14, 1905, to 
]Mrs. Barbara Barton, who was reared in this county, a daughter of 
John Barr, who after living in Stark county for some time removed to 
Xodaway county, iNIissomi, his home being near Biu'lington Junction. 
His daughter Barbara there became the wife of X'athan Barton, who 
followed farming in that locality. 



116 IIISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY 

In politics ]\Ir. Springer is independent and for one term served 
as supervisor, while for a ninnber of years he has been*a member of 
the school board. Both he and his wife are members of the Baptist 
church, in which he is serving as a trustee. Diligence has characterized 
his career at every point. He has worked earnestly and persistently 
to win his success and he knows what hard labor means, but his efforts 
were crowned with prosperity and he is now the possessor of a hand- 
some competence which he has justly earned and richly deserves. 
Those who know him entertain for him warm respect, and he has a 
large circle of friends in the county. 



NELSOX GRANT. 



Among the native sons of Goshen township who served in the war 
of the Rebellion is Nelson Grant, who for years was an active and 
prosperous farmer of the township but is now living retired in 
La Fayette. His birth occurred November 18, 1841. his father being 
Nelson Grant, Sr., who was born in Cortland, Cortland county. New 
York, and was there reared to manhood. He married Polly Chatfield 
on the 12th of October, 1834, and she, too, was a native of New York, 
her birth having occurred in Broome county. In the year 183.) they 
removed westward to Illinois, casting in their lot with the pioneer 
settlers of Stark county at a period when the work of development and 
progress seemed scarcely begun. Only three years before the Black 
V Hawk war had occurred, thus terminating Indian supremacy within 
the borders of Illinois. There were vast sections of land into which 
white men had not penetrated and much of the territory of Illinois was 
yet in possession of the government. The father pre-empted land in 
Goshen township, split rails, fenced his place, built a log cabin and 
occupied that primitive home for several years while developing his 
farm. Upon that place he reared his family and spent the years of 
his active life there. His widow survived him for a few years and 
made her home with her son Nelson. 

It was upon the old homestead farm that Nelson Grant, Jr., spent 
the days of his boyhood and youth, while in the public schools he 
])ursued his education. He was not quite twenty years of age when, 
in September, 1861, he enlisted for service as a soldier of the Civil war, 
joining Company B of the Thirty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infan- 
try, Avhich company was raised in Stark county and was commanded 
by Captain C. V. Dickinson. The regiment was mustered in at 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 117 

Chicago and was sent south to IMissouri. The first engagement iu 
wliich they participated was Pea Ridge, Arkansas, and later they were 
in the battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas. They also took part in the 
siege of ^^icksburg until its surrender and in the Red River expedition. 
In 1863 jNIr. Grant was sent home to recruit men for the regiment, 
whicli he afterward rejoined, and served with his command until the 
expiration of his term of enlistment, when he was honorably dis- 
charged and again came to Stark county. 

For a few years thereafter he remained with his fatlier on the farm 
and on tlie 10th of November, 1877. made arrangements for having a 
home of his own through his marriage to JNIiss JNlary A. Howell, who 
was born near Rochester, New York. She was there reared and 
educated in Ingham University. The young couple began their 
domestic life uj^on a farm which "Sir. Grant rented and which he culti- 
vated for a few years, din-ing which time they most carefully managed 
their expenditures, so that the most of their income was saved, ^\■hich 
enabled them to purchase a farm in Knox county, Illinois. Tiiis, 
however, Mr. Grant rented, while he personally gave his su])ervision 
to the cidtivation of the old home farm until tlie death of his father. 
A vear later he removed to La Fayette, where he purchased a resi- 
dence and has since lived retired. He has added to and remodeled his 
home and now has one of the attractive dwellings of the town. 

In .January. 1912, ]\Ir. Grant was called upon to mourn the loss of 
his wife and his daughter, Ida JNIay, a young lady of twenty j'ears, who 
died Avithin twenty-four hours of each other, and were laid to rest in 
the same grave in La Fayette cemetery. To IMr. and ]\Irs. Grant 
were born three daugliters, of whom the eldest, Kdna ]\Iay, died at the 
age of twelve years. The surviving daughter, Fthel E., was a gradu- 
ate of the La Fayette high school and pursued a business and steno- 
graphic course. She later occupied a business position in Chicago for 
eight years but returned home upon the death of her mother and sister 
and has since acted as her father's housekeeper, devoting her life to 
his happiness. 

Politically JNIr. Grant has been a life long i-epublican, having cast 
his h'rst presidential vote for Abraham Lincoln in 1864. He has 
served as a delegate to numerous county and congressional conven- 
tions and has also been a member of the county central committee from 
Goshen township. He was elected township assessor and afterward 
was re-elected to the office, and later served for two terms as township 
collector. He has also been a member of the village board and is now 
serving as treasurer of La Fayette, discharging liis duties with marked 
promptness, fidelity and ability. He holds membership with W. W. 



118 HISTORY OF STARK COUNT V 

AVright Post, G. A. R., of Toulon, thus maintaining pleasant relations 
^vitll his old army conu-ades. He is likewise a member of the ^lasonic 
lodee at La Fayette and filled many of its chairs. His daughter Ethel 
is comiected with the Eastern Star, in which she is now ^Vorthy 
]Matron. ]Mr. Grant has led a busy, useful and active life, honorable 
in all its relations and straightforward in its purposes, and hi matters 
of citizenship he has been as true and loyal to the country as when he 
followed the old flag upon the battlefields of the south. 



ROBERT L. McCLELLAX. 

Robert L. ]\IcClellan is one of the pojiular citizens of Toulon, 
where he has many friends by whom he is familiarly called Bob. 
No one addresses another by a first name unless there is a spirit of 
comradeship and warm regard such as every one entertains for ]Mr. 
JMcClellan, who is recognized as a wide-awake business man of the 
city, where for the past ten years he has conducted a livery stable. 
His residence in Stark county dates from 1898. He is a native of 
Washington comity, Virginia, born December 3, 1878. 

His father, William ^NlcClellan, was also born and reared in that 
state and was a son of Samuel ^NlcClellan. likewise a native of Vir- 
ginia and a representative of one of its old pioneer families. Samuel 
JNIcClellan served as a soldier in the War of 1812 and also in the 
Civil A\ar. William jNIcClellan has devoted his life to farming and 
stock raising and still resides on the old family homestead. To him 
and his wife were born five children: Etta, the wife of Harvey 
Fuqua, of Richmond, Virginia; R. L., of Toulon: Georgia, the wife 
of Thomas Hutton, of Washington county, Virginia; Nannie, the 
wife of Buck jNIcCloud, also of that county; and Walter. 

In the place of his nativity R. L. McClellan was reared and edu- 
cated, although his privileges of attending school were some^vliat 
limited and his knowledge has largely been acquired since he has 
attained his majority. He came to this county when a young man of 
twenty years and here secured work as a farm hand by the month, 
being thus employed for six years. He afterward removed to Toulon 
and with the capital which he had saved from his earnings he em- 
barked in the livery business. From the beginning he enjoyed suc- 
cess in that undertaking and after a time he built a large cement 
block barn and has excellent equipment for the conduct of his 
business. He also does some freighting and delivers coal. He 





MK. AM) MRS. KOBKKT I.. MiCI.KIJ.AX AXH FA>[1LY 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF IU.JAIOJS 
URBAM 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 121 

started out a poor young man, empty-handed but possessed of reso- 
lute courage and determination, and as the years have passed on he 
has built up a protitable and well established business. The public 
has come to know that in all of his dealings he is reliable as well as 
enterprising, and that in no business transaction does he ever attempt 
to take advantage of the necessities of another. 

In Toulon on the 19th of October, 1909, JNIr. JNIcClellan \\as 
married to jMiss Agnes L. Fell, who was reared and educated in this 
county and is a daughter of Robert Fell, one of the pioneer settlers 
of this part of the state. "Sir. and "Sirs. INIcClellan have two children, 
Dorothy ^Margaret and William Robert. 

]Mr. McClellan belongs to the Masonic lodge of Toulon and his 
wife is connected with the Eastern Star. They are both well knoA\ n 
in this city, where they have an extensive circle of warm friends. JNIr. 
jMcClellan is always courteous and obliging, possesses a genial nature 
and a social disposition, and his sterling qualities have gained for 
him the popularity which he enjoys. 



FRANK COLGAN. 



Frank Colgan. living on section 30, Osceola township, has become 
well known as a breeder of Durliam cattle and Duroc-Jersey hogs as 
well as full-blooded Percheron horses. He was born in Valley town- 
ship, this county, ]May 22, 1869, a son of Bernard and Anne (Sloan) 
Colgan, who were natives of County Down, Ii-eland, but were married 
in this state. The father was a farmer by occupation and developed 
and improved a farm in Valley township, which he converted from 
raw prairie into richly cultivated fields. Both he and his wife are still 
living, their home being in Wyoming, Illinois. 

Frank Colgan attended the district school in Valley township and 
remained at home until he reached the age of twenty-four years, 
beconn'ng familiar with all of the duties and labors that fall to the lot 
of the agriculturist. He then purchased a farm in A'^alley township, 
on the line of INIarshall county, becoming the owner of one hundred 
and twenty acres, upon which he lived for eight years. He then sold 
that property and made an investment in one hundred and sixty acres 
of land in Wheatland township. Bureau county, which he owned and 
cultivated for five years, although he resided thereon for ])ut four 
years. In the spring of 1907 he removed to his present farm on 
section 30, Osceola townshij), and has occupied it for nine years, during 



122 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

wliit'h period he has added many modern improvements and equip- 
ments. He has three himdi'ed and seventeen acres of very vahiahle 
land, the Avork of whicli is facilitated by modern machinery and farm 
imi:)lements. He jiroduces excellent crops and in addition he has been 
extensively engaged in breeding Percheron horses. Five years ago he 
beacan to breed full-blooded Percherons and in the interim has owned 
some fine stock. He has also been the breeder of full-blooded Durham 
cattle, and for six years he has bred Duroc-Jersey hogs. He has like- 
M'ise been an extensive feeder of stock, but at the present time is 
feeding only his own stock and using only the crops which he raises. 

In 189-i JMr. Colgan was married to INIiss jMargaret A. Cartney, 
and they became the parents of seven children. The mother died four 
years ago, or in 191"2, and was laid to rest in St. John's cemetery. 
Of the children Effie, Ellen, Fred, Francis, Jane and Anna are all yet 
at home, while one died in infancy. 

Mr. Colgan is a communicant of St. John's Catholic church of 
Bradford, as w^as his wife, and he is a member of the Catholic Order 
of Foresters. For ten years he served as school director, and he has 
usually given his political support to the democratic party. A self- 
made man, his advancement has been continuous since he started out 
for himself, for in early life he recognized the eternal princij^le that 
industry wins, and he has therefore worked earnestly and ])ersistently 
to attain success. What he has undertaken he has accomplished, utiliz- 
ing his time and opjiortunities to good advantage, and today an 
extensive and valuable farm, splendidly ecjuipped, proves the worth 
of the methods which he has followed. 



M. J. JACKSON. 



M. J. Jackson is a representative of one of the old families of 
Stark county and the name has ever been synonymous of business 
enterprise and integrity through all the connection of the family with 
the agricultural development of this part of the state. It was upon 
tlie fai-m where he now resides that INI. J. Jackson was born January 
18. 1871. his parents being John H. and Abbie S. (Stewart) Jackson. 
The father w^as a jiative of Scotland, while the mother was born in 
Vermont and was of Scotch and German extraction. The son was 
reared upon the old homestead farm and after attending the district 
schools continued his education in the schools of Toulon, Illinois. He 
has spent his entire life upon the old homestead save for a period of 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 123 

about four or five years and noAV owns one hundred and sixty acres of 
land which is well named the JNIaplc Holm Farm. He carries on gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits and has also engaged quite largely in raising- 
stock. His diligence, close application and energy are the salient 
features in his growing success, which has placed him among the 
substantial farmers of the community. 

In January, 1911, Mr. Jackson was married to JNIiss Winnie 
Gardener, who Avas born in Osceola and, like her husband, is widely 
and favorably known in tliis part of the state. They are consistent 
members of the Presbyterian church and enjoy the warm regard of all 
with ^\•hom they have been lirought in contact. In politics INIr. Jack- 
son is a republican and keeps well informed on the questions and issues 
of the day but does not seek nor desire public office. He bends his 
energies to the develoi)ment of his farm and his practical and progres- 
sive methods are bringing substantial residts. 



GEORGE A. MARSH. 



George A. Marsh, who is engaged in the furniture and undertaking 
business in Bradford and is one of the most successful of the younger 
business men of the town, was born there on the 7th of July, 1883, and 
he is a son of Harry A. and Carrie (Searl) JNIarsh. The father was 
born and reared in INIaine, and in his youth learned the confectioner's 
trade. \Vhen about sixteen years of age he came west and for several 
years engaged in setting up portable sawmills, but in 1876 he came to 
Bradford, where he carried on the flom- and feed business. Subse- 
quently he added a line of home-made candies to his stock but at length 
sold his feed store and established a furniture store. He continued 
active in business until twentj^-four hours before his death, which 
occurred in 1910, when he was sixty-three years of age. He was a 
member of the Indejjendent Order of Odd Fellows and served as 
noble grand of his lodge. In religious faith he was a Methodist and 
took an active part in the work of the church. He gained a fair meas- 
use of financial success, all of which was due entirely to his own efforts. 
His wife was l)orn in Stark county and was a daughter of Squire 
Wheeler Searl, who removed here from Pemisylvania at an early day. 
He was a farmer and also devoted considerable time to carpentering. 
She passed her entire life in this county and died wheii about fifty-five 
years of age. She was also a meml)er of the Methodist Episco])al 



124 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

church aiul was the mother of two sons; Wheeler Searl. who is head 
designer for the Green Duck Company of Chicago: and George A. 

The hitter was born in the buihhng in which his store is now 
located and has always resided in Bradford. He received his educa- 
tion in the public schools, and while still a youth gained valuable 
training in mercantile methods through assisting his father in tiie 
conduct of his store. For four years in addition to helping his father 
he carried the mail over a rural route and in the evenings taught music, 
thus securing enough money to buy an interest in the store. At length 
he became sole owner of the establishment, and has since concentrated 
his energies upon its conduct and the development of its trade. He 
completed a course in embalming at Chicago and is also engaged in 
the undertaking business in addition to managing his furniture store, 
and has gained an enviable reputation for giving excellent and unob- 
trusive service. 

:Mr. :Marsh was married on tlie .•JOth of September, 1908. to INIiss 
Xellie Blaisdell, also a native of Bradford and a daughter of J. C. 
Blaisdell. now assistant editor of the Henry Republican of Henry, 
Illinois. ]Mrs. ^Nlarsh was reared and educated here and has many 
warm friends. Her religious faith is that of the Baptist church. 

INIr. ]Marsh is an adherent of the republican party and is now serv- 
ing for the second year as city clerk, in which capacity he has made 
an excellent record. He has also been quite active as a temperance 
worker, as he believes that the liquor evil is responsible for many of 
the bad conditions of the present day. He holds membership in the 
^[ethodist church and is also connected with the Masonic blue lodge, 
tlie Eastern Star and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of 
which he is a past grand. He is progressive and far-sighted in the 
conduct of his business interests and is accorded a large and repre- 
sentative patronage. He is also very popular personally, his salient 
characteristics being such as never fail to win and retain respect. 



CHARLES MYERS. 



Charles :Myers, although not one of the earliest of Stark county's 
pioneers, has yet been a resident of the county for more than sixty 
years, arriving here on the 10th of May. 18.5.3. He was born in 
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, October '2.), 1827. his parents being 
John and Sarah (Stark) ]Myers. From youth to manhood liis prin- 
cipal em])loymcnt was that of the farm and his education was acijuired 



HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 125 

through close application to his studies, pursued during the winter 
seasons in ungraded schools and in the Wyoming Seminary. His 
ancestors were of sturdy stock. His grandfatlier, Philip ^Nlyers, a 
soldier of Washington's army in the Revolutionary war, participated 
ill the battles of Trenton and Princeton and endm-ed the privations 
and sufferings at Valley Forge through the memorably severe winter 
of 1777. His grandmother, at the age of sixteen years, Avas in Fort 
l'\)rtv. near the field of battle, while the dreadful massacre of Wyo- 
ming was being carried on. This was on the 3d day of July, 1778, 
and she and her mother had a most narrow escape from death at tiie 
bands of the savages, whose tomahawk struck down many a settler of 
that region. In his early life 31r. flyers liad frequent conversations 
A\ith soldiers of the Revolutionary war, whose reminiscences and sto- 
ries of battles and of their escapes from death were very interesting 
and instructive. He had the misfortune to lose one l)rother in tlie 
iMexiean war in 18-i8 and another in the Civil war at the battle before 
Richmond, Virginia. 

On the 29th of IMarch, 18.53, ]Mr. JNIyers was united in marriage to 
]Miss Martha A. Pettebone, of Kingston, Pennsylvania, and to them 
were born foui- children : Clara "SI., the wife of Z. T. Brown ; Jane E., 
who became the wife of William R. Reed; Charles Albert, who is in 
the automobile business with the Peoria Auto Company; and Edwin 
L., an electrical engineer now with the Willard Storage Battery 
Coiii])any. 

AVithin the past eighty years ]Mr. flyers has observed many won- 
derful changes in everything that man utilizes as material factors in 
bis life. In his early days science had not obtained control of elec- 
tricity and there were therefore no telegraphs, telephones, electric 
lights nor electric vehicles. He learned to write at a night school, 
using a goose quill pen and home-made ink on foolscap paper, sitting 
by the light of a tallow candle which often burned his fingers when lie 
\vas snuffing it. Changes of every kind have occurred. 

In recounting some of the incidents of tlie early days, JNIr. ]Myers 
says: "I took a trip in the spring of 18.5-2, three years previous to 
settling here permanently, mostly for observation. ^ly jovn-ney was 
made by railroad to Buffalo, by lake to Cleveland, by railroad to 
Cincinnati, by steamboat down the Ohio and up the JNIississippi rivers 
to Muscatine and tlience on horseback for several days over the 
jjrairies of Iowa. I had never before seen a ])rairie and could not help 
exclaiming, 'How grand! How glorious!' Tliose thousands plus 
thousands of acres of rich alluvial soil were waiting the coming of the 
farmer. Nobody wanted it even at seventy-five cents per acre, at 



126 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

which price I bought a few luiii(h-ed aci-es near Iowa City with govern- 
ment script. In returning I rode in a hiinber wagon from tlie ^lissis- 
sippi to the Illinois river, took steamboat to La Salle and thence 
traveled by packet boat on tlie Illinois and ]Michigan canal into 
Chicago and by railroad to Pennsylvania. Tliere was not a railroad 
anywhere west of Ohio tliat I could see or hear of except the Southern 
^lichigan, extending eastward from Chicago. As to that wagon ride: 
I desired to go to Chicago by way of Wyoming, Illinois, and being at 
Xew Boston, I fortunately found John Atherton, who was living just 
south of Toulon and was going my way. His wife and daughter were 
with him, but they readily consented that I go with them. ]Mr. and 
]Mrs. Atherton sat on straight-back, splint-seated chairs, while the 
daughter and I sat upon a board seat a few feet from them. We all 
enjoyed the ride, and I mention this to say that those same two chairs 
may now be seen among the relics of tlie long ago, dei)osited in the old 
log cabin that stands upon the courthouse grounds in Toulon. I found 
Chicago a city built in the mud. The surface was level and I was told 
that it was seven feet above the lake, but it didn't look so liigh. There 
were no paved streets except in the central part of the city, and these 
were made of planks just loose enough to spurt the liquid mud over 
everything that ran over them. The population was thirty-two thou- 
sand seven lumdred and forty, being less than half that of Peoria at 
this time." In business life INIr. INIyers has had varied exjjerience. He 
tauglit school in Pennsylvania in 1848 and still has in his possession 
the teacher's certificate granted him at the time. After removing to 
Illinois in 185.5 he also taught winter months in Toulon and in neigh- 
boring districts. It affords him great pleasure when he occasionally 
meets his old students and, in some cases, his students' children and 
groAvn up grandchildren. For twelve years !Mr. flyers engaged in tlie 
nursery business near Toulon, raising fruit and ornamental trees. In 
1871. when the Peoria & Rock Island Raihoad was built, he began the 
grain business and on the 1st of August shipped out the first car load. 
He erected an elevator with a storage capacity of ten thousand busliels 
and for sliipping five thousand bushels, which fully supplied retjuire- 
ments at that time. This business was conducted for fourteen years, 
after which jNIr. Mj'ers spent four years as an employe in the govern- 
ment internal revenue service at Peoria, in which city he resided for 
eighteen years. There he was engaged in the produce commission 
business and in other lines, and in 1903 he resumed his residence in 
Toulon. 

JNIrs. JNIj-ers died January 23. 1884. and on the 1st of July. 1880, 
iNIr. INIyers was married to ]Miss lantha Brace, of Ehiiira. Illinois. 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 127 

Financially ]Mr. ]Myers has never been bui'dened with,wealth. neither 
has he been stricken with poverty. Politically he is a democrat. On 
the 0th ilay of November. 1848, twelve days after he became of legal 
age, he cast his first vote at a presidential election. He has voted 
seventeen times for president of the United States, which is one more 
than half the total number of those elections held since the formation 
of the government. ]Mr. JNIyers regards good health as the greatest 
of life's blessings. With temperate habits, good appetite, daily phys- 
ical and mental exercise he has maintained his health and is now 
enjoying the passing days of his eighty-ninth year. 



R. Y. LACKIE. 



The student of history cannot carry his investigations far into the 
I'ecords of Stark county without learning of the close and prominent 
connection of the Lackie family Avith those activities and interests 
wliich have led to the development and upbuilding of this section of 
the state. For fifty years R. Y. Lackie has made his home here and 
there is no important chapter in the history of the county with which 
he is not familiar. It was on section 7, Osceola township, that 
Mr. Lackie was born on the 10th of JNIay, 186G, his parents being John 
and Sarah (Fall) Lackie. The father was born in AVest Earnet, 
A'ermont, and the mother's birth occurred in ^Marietta, Ohio. They 
were married, however, in this county and spent their remaining days 
on their farm on section 7, Osceola township, jNIr. Lackie here passing 
n^xny in 1894, while his wife died in 1904. He was a prominent and 
influential citizen of the community not only because of his successful 
activity as a farmer but also by reason of his jiublic-spirited interest 
in the welfare of the district and state. That his fellow townsmen had 
the utmost confidence in his ability and in his devotion to the public 
good is shown by the fact that for twenty-five or thirty years he filled 
the office of county supervisor and for two terms he represented his 
district in the state legislature, having been elected to the office on the 
republican ticket. He was also a prominent member of the Masonic 
fraternity, in which he attained high rank. 

R. Y. Lackie obtained his education in the district schools near his 
father's home, in the iniblic schools of Rradford and also in Geneseo, 
Illinois. He continued to assist his father in the cultivation of the 
home farm until the latter's death and then took over the business. 
He now owns one hundred and sixty acres on section 7, Osceola town- 



128 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

ship, together with forty acres ill Ehnira townsliip, all of which he 
operates. For some time he engaged in the lireeding of thoroughbred 
cattle and is now raising graded stock. This branch of his business is 
pioving important and profitable. He confines his attention closely 
to his business, and his unfaltering enterprise and unabating energy 
have been strong elements in his growing success. 

In JNIarch, 1890, JNIr. Lackie was married to INIiss Anna P. Bus- 
well, and to them were born two children, Harry ]M. and Charles 
Burton. The elder son is a graduate of the Bradford high school and 
of the Iowa State Agricultin'al College at Ames, Iowa, while Cornell 
College of Iowa conferred upon him the ^Master's degree. He is now 
successfully engaged in teaching animal husbandry in the Iowa State 
Agricultural College. The younger son is assisting his father on the 
farm. 

Mr. Lackie gives his political allegiance to the rei)ul)lican party 
and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day, but 
does not seek nor desire public office. His life has been pre-eminently 
that of an active business man. for he finds that the cultivation and 
management of his farm require all of his time and attention, and in 
the control of his agricidtxu-al interests he is meeting with substantial 
success. 



MRS. MARY R. REDFIELD. 

In a history of La Fayette it is imperative that mention he made 
of JNIrs. JMary R. Redfield, who from her early childhood has here 
resided and is numbered among the prominent pioneer women of 
Stark county. She was brought to this county in her infancy, her 
bii'th having occurred in Cleveland, Ohio, JNIay 10, 1836. Her father, 
John 'White, was a native of INIassachusetts, in Avhich state he was 
reared to manhood. He was married in Providence, Rhode Island, to 
Miss Amelia ^Manning, a native of Pennsylvania, and in the year 18'24 
they left Xew England, removing westward to Ohio. They took up 
their abode ujion a farm near Cleveland and while there residing two 
of their children were born. In 183G they came to Illinois, making 
their Avay direct to Stark county, at which time they settled on a tract 
of land adjacent to the present town site of La Fayette. jNIr. White 
built thereon a little log house, in which the family lived for a number 
of years, meeting all of the experiences, hardships and privations of 
pioneer life. There were also many pleasures to be enjoyed, for at 




MRS. JIARY R. REDFIELD 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

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HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 131 

that time there was a spirit of friendliness and helpfulness whieh is 
l^erhaps not as prevalent at the present time. Mr. White was the 
o\^•ner of three hundred and twenty aeres of land, whieh he developed 
and improved, and he also bought and owned other tracts, making- 
judicious investments as his financial resources increased. He reared 
his children upon the home place and there spent his last days, passing 
away at the age of fifty-three years. His wife survived him for 
several years. 

jNlrs. Redfield was reared in La Fayette and is indebted to the 
public school system for her educational opportunities. In early life 
she took up the profession of teaching, which she followed for two 
terms, but her hand was sought in marriage by Benjamin F. Smith, 
and in 1855 she became his wife. For a number of years he carried 
on farming in Stark county, devoting his energies to general agri- 
cultural pursuits until 1865. Although in poor health, he was drafted 
into the army and sent to the east, but because of his physical condi- 
tion was sent to the hospital in Philadelphia, where he died on the 
22d of June of that year. He left fom- children: Frank, a railroad 
man now residing in St. Joseph, Missouri; Amelia, who died in 1910; 
Carrie jNIay, the wife of Timothy Bailey, living in the state of Wash- 
ington; and Jessie, the wife of John Ticlow, a farmer of Goshen 
township. 

On the 12th of September, 1867, ^Irs. Smith became the wife 
of Gilbert Redfield, in La Fayette, and they established their home 
upon a farm near the town, JNIr. Redfield being there engaged in the 
cultivation of the soil for several years. At length they lost their resi- 
dence by fire, at which time they established their home in the village 
and jNIr. Redfield afterward lived retired until his death, which 
occurred in 1905. He reached the very advanced age of eighty years 
and was one of the venerable citizens of the community, honored 
and respected by all who knew him. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Redfield were born a son and daughter; Arthur, 
who is now an undertaker and funeral director of Spencer, Iowa; 
and ]Mary A., the wife of E. F. Jones, who is one of the public 
officials of the state of Washington and has an office in the capitol 
at Olympia. 

]Mrs. Redfield is a member of the Woman's Relief Corps and of 
the Universalist church and is identified with its various auxiliary 
societies. She is todaj^ one of the oldest residents of Goshen town- 
ship and Stark countj^ in years of continuous connection therewith. 
]\Iore than three-quarters of a century have passed since she was 

brought to this county and she is therefore familiar with almost its 

Vol. n- 7 



132 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

entire history. She is still quite active and her hearing and eyesight 
are but slightlj' inqjaired. She possesses a very retentive memory and 
relates many interesting incidents of the early days when Stark 
county was a pioneer district, in which the work of settlement and 
improvement was thus being commenced. She has witnessed the 
many changes that have occurred as pioneer homes have been replaced 
bj" modern residences, as candles have given way to kerosene lamps, 
and these in turn to the gas and electric light. She has seen the build- 
ing of railroads, the introduction of the telegraph and telephone 
throughout the state, and her long residence in this county has made 
her familiar with almost every point of its history. 



JAI^IES HOLGATE. 



James Holgate resided in Stark county from 1833 until his death 
in 1886 and became one of the leading farmers of Penn township. 
Through untiring industry and the practice of thrift he gained finan- 
cial independence and passed his last years in AN^yoming. He served 
for a considerable period as county judge and also represented his 
district in the legislature. His birth occurred in Philadel])hia, Penn- 
sylvania, on the 26th of July, 1804, and he was a son of Jacob and 
Elizabeth (Sheets) Holgate. His paternal grandfather was a native 
of England and established the family in the United States. 

On reaching manhood James Holgate removed to Luzerne county, 
Pennsylvania, where he learned the miller's trade, but subsequently 
he turned his attention to the manufacture of woolen goods and still 
later, in 1829, established a store at Kingston, Pennsylvania. In 1833 
he disposed of that business and removed westward to Stark county, 
Illinois, purchasing eighty acres three miles northeast of Wyoming, 
in Penn township. He at once began the improvement of his place 
and brought it to a high state of cultivation. He found farming- 
profitable and as his resources increased invested in additional land, 
becoming in time the owner of five hundred and forty acres. He owed 
his success solely to his hard work and careful management and was 
very thorough and ])ainstakiiig in all that he did. Iji 187.5 he removed 
to Wyoming, where he resided until his death in 1886. He was chosen 
the first countj^ judge and held that office for eight years, making a 
record of efficient and conscientious service in that capacity. He was 
also justice of the peace for some time, represented his district in the 
state lecrislature and was elected to other offices of trust. He dis- 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 133 

charged his duties with such scrupulous regard for the pubHc welfare 
that there was never the slightest doubt of his integrity. 

JNlr. Ilolgate was married in April, 1827, to JNliss Sylvina Trux, 
of Troy, Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, who passed away on the farm 
in Stark county in November, 1872. To them were born twelve chil- 
dren, namely: Jacob, who died in Oregon; INIaria, who married John 
Snare and died in this county: George, who died in infancy: Elizabeth, 
the deceased wife of ^Villiam P. Ruswell; Erastus, who died in 
Oregon; Charles, a resident of JNIanhattan, Montana; JNIary Ann, who 
married Calvin Hart and resides in Nebraska; Harriet, the deceased 
wife of E. Gharett; J. R., a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this 
work; William, an account of whose life is given on another page of 
this work; Martha, who died in girlhood; and Reuben, deceased. 

INIr. Holgate was a lifelong democrat and did everything in his 
power to promote the success of that party at the polls. At one time 
lie belonged to the 3Iethodist church, of which his wife was a member 
from girlhood until her death. They were among the early settlers of 
the county and their many sterling qualities gained them the sincere 
respect of all who knew them, while those who were closely associated 
with them held them in warm personal regard. 



JOHN WESLEY RIST. 

John Wesley Rist, who owns ten acres adjoining Toulon, gives 
some time to the cultivation of his land but devotes the greater part 
of his attention to weaving rugs and carpets and to the operation of 
liis cleaning plant. He was born in Connellsville, Pennsylvania, on 
the 18th of October, 18.53, a son of JNIartin and Elizabeth (JMyers) 
Rist, both natives of Pennsylvania. In 18.57 or 1858 the family 
removed to Stark county, Illinois, and located in Toulon townshi]), 
where the father purchased one hundred and sixty acres of raw prairie 
land. In a com])aratively short time he had brought his place under 
cultivation and as the years passed he continued to improve it. He 
also pin-chased other land, and at the time of his death owned three 
hundred and sixty acres. His first wife, the mother of our subject, 
died many vears ago, and he afterward married ^Irs. Elizal)eth 
INIorris. who also preceded him in death. He passed away in Toulon 
in 1909. He gave his political allegiance to the republican party for 
some time but later became identified with the prohibition party. He 



m HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

never used liquor or tobacco in any form, and all of his sons have 
followed his excellent example. His religious faith, which was that 
of tlie ^Methodist church, guided liis life, and he was one of the most 
influential members of the local church. Three sons and a daughter 
were born to his first marriage, and a daughter and a son to his second, 
namely: John Wesley; Ervin, who died in childhood; P'ranklin, who 
is a ^Methodist minister and is located in Kansas; Sarah Ann, the wife 
of Joseph Chase, of Toulon; Onetta, who married ]Mardo Leitch and 
resides in Iowa; and Benjamin, who is a JNIethodist minister stationed 
near Chicago, Illinois. 

John W. Rist was reared upon the home farm and followed 
agricultural pursuits for a number of years although he never found 
fanning very congenial. For five years he resided in Spring Hill, 
Warren county, Iowa, and subsequently returned to Stark county 
and operated tlie homestead for some time. In 1904 he pnrchased ten 
acres adjoining Toulon, where he has since lived. He does a little 
fai'ming but devotes the greater part of his time to other pursuits. He 
is an expert weaver of rngs and carpets and has no difficulty in find- 
ing a sale for his work. He also has a plant for cleaning rugs and 
carpets and as he is much interested in mechanics and industrial pro- 
cesses of various kinds he finds this phase of his activity very eon- 
genial. Everything that he does is well done, and his work yields him 
a good income. 

3Ir. Rist was married in 1879 to ^Nliss Alice ]M. Goodale, a native 
of this county and a daughter of Gustavus Goodale, an early settler 
here. To this union have been born eight children, namely: Charles, 
a farmer of Toulon township, who mai-ried a ^Nliss ^lassie, by ^^•hom 
he has three children: Winfred James, a resident of Bvn't. Iowa, who 
married ^Nliss Emma ^Vinans, by whom he has two children: ^Martin 
G., a farmer of Alberta, Canada, who married ]Miss Lillian Clay- 
baugh and had four children, lint two died in infancy; Avery ]M., of 
Carthage. South Dakota, who wedded JNliss Gertrude Jones, by whom 
lie has two children: Elsie, the wife of Harley Rhodes, a farmer of 
Goshen township, by whom she has two children; Clara, who married 
Walter Knapp, of Toulon township, by whom she has four children : 
Frank, a resident of Galva, who married ]Miss Ada Greenwood, by 
whom he has four children; and Gelila. at home. 

3Ir. Rist is a supporter of the prohibition party as he is firmly 
convinced that many of the problems of the day have their origin in 
the liquor traffic. He is also much opposed to the use of tobacco, 
believing it injurious to health. He and his family are all members 
of tlie ^Methodist cliurch. and he is serving on the official board. His 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 135 

influence is always on the side of reform and righteousness, and there 
lias never been the slightest question as to his integrity. He is well 
known and highly esteemed. 



SAMUEL L. HANKS. 



Samuel I^. Hanks, one of the active and progressive men of Stark 
county, is engaged in the hardware and implement Itusiness at La Fay- 
ette, Avhere for sixteen years he has conducted his store. There have 
been no sjjectacular phases in his career but the persistent purpose 
Avitli which he has managed his interests and the sound judgment 
which he displays in the control of his agricultural aflfairs have 
brought him a gratifying measure of success. Numbered among 
Illinois' native sons, he was born in Albany, Whiteside county, July 
16, 18G4. His father. Samuel S. Hanks, was born in Kentucky and 
was a son of Thomas Hanks, also a native of that state and a brother 
of Nancy Hanks, who became the mother of Abraham Lincoln. 

Samuel S. Hanks was reared in Kentucky and when a young man 
removed to Illinois, establishing his home in Whiteside county. He 
later followed boating on the JMississippi river and became a pilot, 
devoting many years to that life and being a well-known figure in 
connection with the navigation interests of the upjier ]Mississippi. He 
was married in Henry county to Miss Hannah Stagg, a native of 
Ohio, who came to Illinois wlien a maiden of ten summers. Following 
his marriage ]Mr. Hanks continued to act as a pilot on the ^Mississippi 
dm-ing his active life but is now living retired in Princeton. Iowa, 
enjoying a rest which he has trulj' earned and richly deserves. 

Sanmel L. Hanks was reared in Scott county, Iowa, from the age 
of three years and was educated in the Princeton schools. When a 
young man he went upon the river with his father and there learned 
the ])usiness of piloting. To that w^ork he devoted eighteen years, 
continuing active in that field of laboi- u?itil he reached the age of 
thirty-four. The year 1900 witnessed his arrival in La Fayette, at 
which time he purchased a half interest in a hardware store and thus 
became identified with the business interests of the town. Success 
attended him in this venture, and in 1903 he became sole proprietor of 
the business by the purchase of his partner's interest. He carries a 
large and well selected line of shelf and heavy hardware and farm 
implements, building up a good trade, his patronage increasing year 
by year. He has ever recognized the fact that satisfied patrons are the 



136 HISTORV OF STARK COUNTY 

best advertisement, and he has always made it his aim and purpose to 
please his customers in the line of goods carried and in the reasonable 
prices offered. He was also one of the promoters of the La Fayette 
State Bank and is a stockholder of the La Fayette Fair Association, 
which he aided in organizing. He is likewise connected with tlie 
La Fayette Hotel Company, which erected an eight thousand dollar 
hotel in the town. In business affairs he displays keen discrimination 
and readily discriminates between the essential and the non-essential. 

JMr. Hanks was married in Princeton, Iowa, October 20, 1898, to 
]Miss Anna Schmalz. who was born and reared in that city, and by her 
mariiage has become the mother of two children: Linian, who died 
in infancy; and Elinor CoUette, who died in her second year. 

Mr. and ]Mrs. Hanks are members of the ^Methodist Episcopal 
clunx'h and he is serving on its board of trustees. He is a member of 
the ]Masonic lodge at I^^a Fayette, of which he is the treasiu'cr, and he 
and his wife are identified with the Eastern Star. He is likewise con- 
nected with La Fayette Lodge, I. O. O. F.. in which he has filled all 
of the chairs and is now a past grand, while in the Grand Lodge of 
the state he has twice represented the local organization. He and his 
wife are identified with the Rebekah degree. Their influence is always 
a feature in public progress and improvement in the community in 
which they live. IMr. Hanks lias served for three terms as a member 
of the village board, and his active support of every movement and 
plan for the general good has been of great benefit to the town. He 
possesses many sterling traits of character, including progressiveness 
and reliability in business, fidelity in citizenship and loyalty in 
friendship. 



JOHX H. STURM. 



John H. Sturm is numbered among the honored veterans of the 
Civil A\"ar who are now residing in Stark county and throughout the 
])eriod of his connection with the Union army he made a most credi- 
talile military record in defense of the stars and stripes. He is now 
living in Bradford and is one of the native sons of Osceola townshi]). 
his birth having occurred August 24, 1841. His parents were Samuel 
and Elizabeth (Phenfx) Sturm. His paternal grandfather was 
Matliias Sturm, who was born in Rockingham county, Virginia, and 
in his boyhood removed to Kentucky and afterward to Ohio, where he 
remained until 1832, when he became a resident of Peoria countv, 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 137 

Illinois. It was in that year that the Black Hawk war was waging, 
determining the right of the white man to the land comprised within 
the borders of this fair state, bnt there were still many evidences of 
Indian occupancy throughout Illinois when in 1833 JNIathias Sturm 
came to Stark county. He located in that section now comprised with- 
in Osceola township, becoming one of the first settlers of this district. 

Samuel Sturm, the father of John H., was born in Shelby county, 
Ohio, and accompanied his jiarents on their removal to Illinois. He 
was married in Stark county, Octol)er i. 1838, to Elizabeth Phenix, a 
native of I^ir/erne county, Pennsylvania. Following their marriage 
they went with two other young couples to Peoria county to attend a 
camp meeting and all were converted, confessing their faith in 
Christianity. Mr. and ^Nlrs. Sturm lived together for sixty years, their 
lives characterized by strict adherence to Christian principles. They 
settled on land in Osceola township and from the raw prairie he 
developed rich and productive fields, continuing- to engage in active 
farming almost to the time of his death, which occurred when he was 
eiglity-four years of age. His widow ])assed away at the age of 
eighty-eight, both dying in Bradford. iNIi-. Sturm served as school 
trustee and was greatly interested in the educational development of 
the countj'. 

John H. Sturm attended the common schools near his father's 
home and worked upon the farm through the summer months, early 
becoming familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring 
for the crops. But with the outbreak of the Ci\il war he abandoned 
the plow in order to shoulder the musket and went to the front as a 
defender of the Union, having enlisted on the 12th of August. 18()2, 
as a member of Company B, One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois 
Volunteer Infantry. He served with that command until honorably 
discharged in Chicago on the 20th of June, 1865, and took j^art in many 
hotly contested engagements. During the battle of Franklin, Ten- 
nessee, he participated with his command in the four charges which 
were made by the Union troops and in that battle there was also nuich 
hand to hand fighting. 

AVhen the war was over and the country no longer needed his 
aid Mr. Sturm returned to Stark County and assisted in building the 
railroad through this part of the state. In 18G9 he removed to Oak- 
dale. Shelby county, [Missouri, where he began farming, and he is 
still the owner of his place of eighty acres there, upon which he lived 
for thirty-two years. At the end of that time he returned to Brad- 
ford, where he now makes his home, having a good residence in the 
town. 



138 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

On the "iSth of March, 18G9, Mr. Sturm married Miss Lucy A. 
liibby, and they have two sons: Oliver Perry, who is engaged in the 
real estate and hfe insurance business at Tulsa, Oldahoma; and 
George Wesley, a wliolesale and retail merchant of Billings, ^lontana. 
Both of the sons have been very successful in business and are now 
well-to-do. 

In politics JNIr. Sturm follows an independent course, save where 
national issues are involved, when he votes with the democratic party. 
He has frequently been solicited to become a candidate for public 
office but has always refused. He has been a lifelong member of the 
Methodist church, to which his wife also belonged to the time of her 
death, which occurred five years ago. On the 2()th of June, 18(>7. he 
took tlie jNIaster jNIason's degree and became a charter member of 
Bradford Lodge. He also is identified with the Royal Arch cliapter 
at Wyoming, and he and liis wife became members of the Order of the 
Eastern Star. He maintains pleasant relations with his old army 
conn-ades through his membership in the Grand Army post at Brad- 
ford and proudly wears tlie little bronze button that proclaims liiin to 
have been one of the defenders of the Union (hu'ing the darkest hour in 
our country's history. 



WILLIAM R. SAXDHAM. 

William R. Sandliam, son of James and Sarah (Connelly) Sand- 
ham, was born in Northumberland county, Ontario, Canada. Sep- 
tember 23, 1842. His father was born near Preston, England, and 
his mother at Loughrea, Ireland. Tlie father died in 184.7. In 18.51 
the mother and two children, AVilliam R. and John, moved to Herki- 
mer county. New York. The sons were educated in the common 
schools of New York and at Fairfield Seminary, one of the leading- 
educational institutions in that state, located at Fairfield, Herkimer 
county. 

William R. Sandham tangiit school several terms in Herki- 
mer county. He came to Illinois in ^Nlarch, 1866, and located in 
Henry county, where he was a teacher foi- four years. He came to 
Stark county in September, 1871, to take charge of the Bradford 
schools. In August, 1873, he applied for and received a state certifi- 
cate which is good for life and entitles liim to teach in any scliool dis- 
trict in the state of Illinois. In September, 1873. he assumed charge of 
the South Side school in Wyoming, which position he held until the end 





-\li;. AM) .Mi;s. WILI.IA.M I!. SAXDIIAM 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 141 

of the school year 1879. During the hist named year he purchased 
the Wyoming Post and later he bought the Wyoming Herald. The 
two papers were united and called the ^Vyoming Post-Herald. 

In September, 1882, ]Mr. Sandham was elected county superin- 
tendent of schools of Stark county and was reelected in 1886, 188!) 
and 1894, serving the jDCople in that office from December 4<, 1882, to 
December 4, 1898. By appointment of the board of supervisors he 
held the same office from December 1, 1891, to December 1, 1902. In 
recognition of his jjractical knowledge of school affairs he was 
appointed in the year 188.5 by Governor Richard J. Oglesby a mem- 
ber of the state board of education, which i^osition he held until 
March, 1893. He was reappointed in 1897 by Governor John K. 
Tanner and held the position until August, 1913. 

yir. Sandham was one oi' the organizers of the State Historical 
Society in 1899 and is still a member of that society. He has written 
numerous Illinois historical sketches for the Wyoming Post-Herald 
and a somewhat lengtliy appreciation for tlie Illinois Historical Jour- 
nal of the Hon. James II. ^Miller, of Stark county, who at the time 
of his death was speaker of the Illinois house of representatives and 
by whose efforts the Illinois Historical Library was established at 
Springfield. 

After retiring from school work, INIr. Sandham was for six years 
assessor of the townsliip of Toulon, one of tlie richest townshi2)s in 
central Illinois. He is a member of Wyoming Lodge, A^o. 479, 
A. F. & A. ]M., and was its secretary for six years. He Avas one of 
the princijial workers in the establishment of the Wyoming public 
library and was the first president of the library board. He has also 
been secretary of the Stark County Telephone Company since 1905. 

iNIr. Sandham was married at Atkinson, Illinois, July 16, 1871, 
to ]Miss Rhoda S. Tuttle, who was born in Xaugatuck, New Haven 
county, Connecticut, January 17, 1849. Tliey have had one child. 
Arthur, who was born December 13, 1874, and died INIay 1.5. 1883. 
On her father's side ]\Irs. Sandham traces her ancestry back to 
William Tuttle, one of the first English settlers in Connecticut, who 
at one time owned a part of what later became the grounds of Yale 
University in New Haven. On her mother's side she traces her 
ancestry to Andrew^ Sanford, who came to Connecticut from Eng- 
land in 1636. She is eligible on both sides for membership in the 
society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. She was one 
of the organizers of the Tuesday Club in Wyoming and was its 
president for six years. 

In 1861 ]Mr. Sandham's mother married Joseph Schlosser. \\lio 



142 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

in response to President Lincoln's call for volunteers to aid in put- 
ting down the rebellion, enlisted in the Fourteenth New York Heavy 
Artillery and was killed at the battle of Weldon Railroad. JNlrs. 
Schlosser was a United States pensioner until the time of her death 
at Annawan, Illinois, January 31, 1001. INIr. Sandhani's brother 
John lives in Harlan, Iowa. He has two sons: Josiah Dow, of 
Omaha, Nebraska; and Ralph R., of Harlan, Iowa. His only sister, 
INIrs. JNIargaret ISIcCartney, died in Winnipeg, ^Manitoba, in Janu- 
ary, 1913, 



HYMEN DE WOLF. 



Hymen De Wolf is now living a retired life in La Fayette but for 
a long period was actively engaged in general agricultural pursuits in 
West Jersey township, where he still owns a farm of one hundred 
and forty acres, from whicli lie derives a substantial annual income. 
He followed the most practical and progressive methods of farnung 
when living upon that ])lace and the result of his labors Was seen in 
the large crops which he annually gathered. 

Stark county numbers him among her native sons, his birth liaving 
occurred in West Jersey township, JNIarch .5, 18.5o. His father, Joseph 
De A\\)lf, was born in Canada and was there reared to adult age. 
Making his way to the United States he settled at once in Stark 
county, Illinois, and was here married on the 6th of April, 1841. to 
]Miss Mary Aim Gibbs, a native of New Jersey and a daugliter of 
Joseph Gibbs, who at an early day removed from New Jersey to 
Illinois and establislied a home in Stark county. In the early days of 
his residence here Joseph De Wolf purchased a small tract of land, 
split rails and fenced his farm. He also built a good house upon his 
])lace and carried on the work of development and improvement. 
However, he had worked as a farm hand by the month for several 
years before he was married. He led an active, busy and useful life, 
was careful and conservative in the management of his property and 
was industrious and energetic in carrying on the labors of the fields. 
Upon his farm he reared his family and spent his remaining days, 
tliere passing aAvay at the age of sixty-four years, six months and 
nineteen days, his death occurring on the 3d of January, 1881. His 
wife survived him for a brief period, her death occurring January 10, 
1884. when she had reached the age of sixty-two years, four months 
and fifteen davs. 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 143 

Hymen De A\\)lf was reared on the old homestead and assisted his 
father on the farm until he attained his majority, thus hecomiug 
familiar with the hest methods of tilling the soil and caring for the 
crops. On the 9th of Fehruary, 1870, he married INIiss Arminda 
Kennedy, who was l)orn in Knox county, Illinois, hut was reared and 
educated in Stark County. Her father, tieorge Kennedy, was a 
native of Tennessee, where he was reared, coming when a young man 
to Illinois. He cast in his lot with the pioneer settlers of Knox county 
and afterward removed to Bates county, ]Missouri. where he spent his 
remaining days upon a farm, his death occurring in 1884. His wid(>A\ 
survived him for a numher of years and returned to Illinois, making 
her home with her daughter, ]\Irs. De Wolf, for twenty-one years. 
She died on the home farm of the De "^Volfs in 1907. 

For two years after his marriage Hymen De ^Volf lived upon his 
father's jjlace and then rented another farm across the road, devoting 
his attention to the cultivation of both tracts of land until his father's 
death. Later he rented and cultivated the old homestead for several 
years and afterward jjurchased the farm. He also bought land 
adjoining and he now owns one hundred and forty acres, which he 
brought to a high state of cultivation. JMost of it was covered with 
timber l)ut he cleared away the trees, planted crops and made the farm 
a most productive one. He erected a good residence, also built good 
barns and sheds for the shelter of grain and stock, and divided his 
land into fields of convenient size by well kept fences. In fact he added 
all modern equipments and accessories to the place, including the latest 
improved machinery to facilitate the work of the fields. 

In 1912 ^Ir. De Wolf removed to La Fayette, where he purchased 
a good residence and is now living practically retired. He was one of 
the ])romoters of the La Fayette Fair Association, of which he is still 
a stockholder, and he has been actively and helpfully interested in 
many movements which have resulted beneficially to the community. 
INIr. and ]Mrs. De Wolf are now alone. They have had but two chil- 
dren and both sons are married. Llewellyn, the elder, owns and 
operates a farm in West Jersey township, and to him and his wife have 
been born two children. Ray, the younger son, is farming the old 
homestead. He is married and has a son and daughter. 

In his political views JMr. De Wolf is a democrat hut has never 
been an aspirant for public office. His wife l)elongs to the Christian 
church. Throughout his entire life Hymen De Wolf has lived in this 
part of the state and has therefore wn'tnessed the greater part of the 
growth and development of Stark county. He has seen the estal)lisii- 
ment of many of its leading industries, the growth of its towns and 



144 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

tlie developineiit of its rariiiiiig district until Illinois claims no richer 
or more valuable land than the farms of Stark county. His own l)usi- 
ness affairs have been wisely and carefully managed, and his laboi's 
have brought him the substantial measure of success which is today his. 
He has a wide acquaintance in the county and wherever he is known 
he is siJoken of in terms of warm regard. 



J. C. FLEMING. 



J. C. Fleming, who carries on general farming on section .'J.'j, 
Elmira township, was born a half mile north of his present home on 
the 12th of February, 18.58, his jjarents being Samuel C. and Rebecca 
(Bonsell) Fleming, both of whom were .natives of Clearfield county, 
Pennsylvania, where they were reared and married. They afterward 
removed to Illinois and the father purchased Avhat became known as 
the old Fleming homestead, then a tract of raw land upon which not 
a furrow had been turned or an improvement made. He had tlie lanil 
broken in 1865 and the work of developing the farm was begun. He 
was a carpenter by trade but lived upon the home farm up to the time 
of his retirement from active business, when he removed to Toulon, 
where his remaining days were passed. He died in 1907, at which 
time he lacked only six days of being ninety-five years of age. He 
had long survived his wife, who jiassed away upon the farm in 1867- 

J. C. Fleming was educated in the common schools, which he 
attended through the Avinter seasons, while the summer months were 
devoted to work upon the home farm. After attaining his majority 
he was employed as a farm hand through the neighborhood up to the 
time of his marriage, which occurred when he was twenty-seven years 
of age. He then leased the farm from his father and cultivated it for 
five years, at the end of which time he purchased one hundred and 
six acres of the old home property and thereon has since given his 
attention to general agricultural pursuits, bringing his fields imder a 
high state of cultivation and adding mam^ modern improvements to 
the ]iroperty. 

In 188.) ]Mr. Fleming was miited in marriage to ]Miss Annie J. 
^NIofRt and they became the parents of six children, namely: Esther, 
at home: Rebecca Jane, who is a school teacher; Emma, who is 
engaged in teaching music: Elsie, a student in jNIonmouth College: 
and ]Mary and Roljert R., both at home. 

In his political views JNIr. Fleming has alwavs been a democrat 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY U5 

and for two years he filled the office of tax collector. He belongs to 
the 31asonic lodge at Toulon and the INIodern Woodmen camjj at 
J'^lniira and he and his family are members of the United Presbyterian 
church, in the work of which they are much interested, contributing 
generously to its support and taking a helpful part in promoting 
the growth and extending the influence of the church. jNIr. Fleming- 
has spent his entire life in this countj^ and therefore through fifty- 
eight years has been a witness of its growth and development, so that 
there is little of concern in connection with its history with which he is 
not familiar. He has always been regarded as one of its sul)stantial 
citizens, his \\orth being widely acknowledged by friends and neigh- 
bors. 



D. HARRY WHISKER. 

That Stark county oiFers excellent advantages to its citizens is 
indicated by the fact that many of its native sons have remained witii- 
in its borders, never feeling the necessity of seeking opportunity else- 
where. Such is the record of D. Harry Whisker, whose home is on 
section 7, Osceola township. It was upon the farm where he now 
resides that he was born on the 31st of July, 1888, a son of Daniel 
Richardson Whisker, also a native of this comity, and a grandson of 
Daniel Richardson Whisker, Sr., who was the first progenitor of the 
family in Stark county, arriving here in pioneer times. The father 
followed farming throughout the entire jieriod of his active business 
career but is now living retired at Xo. 733 jNIorton avenue in Ke- 
wanee, Illinois. His w-ife, wiio bore the maiden name of Isabelle 
l?rock, died four years ago. 

D. Harry "Whisker attended the public schools of this county and 
has spent his entire life here save one year which he passed in jNIinne- 
sota. He was reared to the occupation of farming, early becoming- 
familiar with the best methods of tilling the soil and caring for the 
cro])s. He worked in the fields tlirough the summer months ancf 
attended school in the winter seasons and since his textbooks have l)een 
l)ut aside he has concentrated Jiis entire attention upon his farming- 
interests. He now operates one hundred and eighty acres of rich 
and ])roductive land and he has a Avell equipped farm supplied with all 
the latest improved machinery and farm implements, including a 
tractor. He is making a specialty of the feeding of hogs. 

On the 11th of September, 1909, Mr. Whisker was married to 



146 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

31iss Lillian Swearingen, a daughter of Thomas Swearingeu and a 
native of Biu'eau county, Illinois. They have become parents of four 
children: James Earl, Ina Octavia and Helen Loran, all at home: and 
I3orothy, who has j^assed aAvay. 

]Mr. Whisker exercises his right of franchise in support of the men 
and measures of the republican party. He does not seek nor desire 
office but concentrates his efforts upon his business affairs and is a 
progressive and enterprising young farmer who is meeting with 
excellent and well deserved success in his undertakings. 



THOMAS HALL. 



Amonu' the highlv esteemed residents of Bradford is Thomas 



v-i 



Hall, a retired farmer, who was born in Derbyshire, England, on the 
27th of September, 1840. His parents, John and Elizabeth (Smed- 
ley) Hall, were also natives of that county and were there reared and 
married. The father was in the employ of a gentleman of that locality 
for some time but in June, 18.56, emigrated with his family to the 
L'nited States. He at once made his way to Stark County. Illinois, 
where he had a brother and sister living. He rented a farm near Brad- 
ford and subsequently purchased eighty acres of land, to which lie 
added from time to time until he owned two hundred and forty acres. 
He passed away when eighty-one years old but his wife died in the 
3'ear that they emigrated to this country at the early age of forty years. 
They were the parents of seven children: John, who died in ^Missouri; 
Thomas: Isaac, who passed away in Bradford: ]Mary, the wife of 
Henry Grife, a resident of Iowa; Elizabeth, who married William 
Wai-wick and is living in Xebraska; Charlotte, the wife of Frank 
Brock, also a resident of Xebraska; and ]Martha, Avho gave her hand 
in marriage to John Camey. a resident of Colorado. 

Thomas Hall remained in his native land until he was sixteen 
years of age, when he accompanied his parents to the United States. 
Following his mother's death the home was liroken up and he began 
woi-king for Josiah Deyo of Stark county, in whose em])loy he re- 
mained for four years. At the end of that time he purchased a 
team and rented eighty acres of land, which he cultivated until he was 
able to buy an eighty acre tract, paying therefor one thousand dollars. 
He had to borrow some of the money, but his industry and good 
management soon enabled him to pay off that debt and as the years 
passed his resources increased. He continued to invest in land and 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 147 

at length acquired title to nine hundred acres in Stark and Marshall 
counties. He was actively engaged in agricultural pursuits until 
190G, Avhen he rented his farms to his sons and removed to Bradfoid, 
wliere he has since lived retired. His investments return him a hand- 
some income, and he is enjoying a period of leisure which is weli 
deserved. 

On the 5th of April, 1877, jNIr. Hall was united in marriage to 
INIiss Rosie INI. AVilson, who was born in New York on the 22nd of 
September, IH'ii, but was brought to Stark county when nine montlis 
old by her father. Her mother passed away when she was l)ut six 
weeks old. Mr. and ]M]s. Hall liave become the parents of five chil- 
dren : Nettie Elizabeth, who died when a young woman of twenty-five 
years; Richard T., who is farming land belonging to his father in this 
county; George H., who is operating his father's farm in Alarshall 
county; and Albert R. and Frank C, both of whom are farming land 
belonging to their father in this comity. 

]Mr. Hall is a stanch republican in politics and has served with 
credit as school director and has also held other minor offices. He 
and his wife are members of the JMethodist Episcopal church, of wliich 
he is also a trustee, and they seek to extend its influence in every way 
possible. Their lives are guided by high principles and JNIr. Hall is 
recognized as a man of great personal worth and as a public-spirited 
citizen as well as an efficient and progressive agriculturist. 



A. OLIVER TURNBULL. 

A. Oliver Turnbull, a resident farmer of Elmira townshiji, living 
on section 31, was born in Bureau county, Illinois, April 29, 1861, a 
son of John IT. and INIary (Armstrong) Turnbull, botli of whom were 
natives of Scotland, where they were reared. The former was a son 
of William Turnbull and with his father crossed the Atlantic to the 
new world in early life, the family home being establislied in Stark 
County, Illinois. When John H. Turnbull started out in life on his 
own account he removed to Bureau county but afterward returned to 
Stark county, where he passed away on tlie 8tli of ]May, 191.5. His 
Avife died about eight years ago. They had long been well known 
farming people of tliis section of the state and their genuine personal 
Avorth endeared them to all witli wliom they came in contact. 

A. Oliver Turnbull was for two years a pupil in the schools of 
Bureau County and continued his education in the common schools 



148 HISTOKV OF STARK COUNTY 

of Stark county. He received ample training in farm work upon the 
old liomestead, upon which he resided until about fourteen years ago, 
wiien he purchased his jjresent farm, situated on section 31, Elmira 
townshi^j. This is an excellent tract of land of two hundred and 
thirty-four acres uj^on which he has placed good improvements, and 
he always keeps barns, buildings and fences in a state of good repair. 
He both raises and feeds stock quite extensively, making a specialty of 
hogs, and at the present time he has ui)()n his place two hundred and 
forty-five young pigs for the spring market. His business att'airs are 
systematically and wisely managed and he has met with a gratifying- 
measure of success in his undertakings. 

In 1893 ]Mr. Turnbull was united in marriage to 3Iiss ^lary 
^IcHofFey. who was born in Henry county, Illinois, and they have 
two children, Susie and Raymond, the latter assisting in the work of 
the farm. The parents are members of the Presbyterian church and 
INIr. Turnbull belongs also to the [Masonic lodge at Toulon. In politics 
he has followed in his father's footsteps and is a stalwart republican. 
He has served as road boss but has never sought or desired other 
office. His time is fully occupied with the lalwrs and duties of tlie 
farm and as the result of his careful management and close applica- 
tion his place has become one of the attractive farm properties of the 
neighborhood. 



GEORGE ARMSTRONG. 

George Armstrong, a representative of farming interests in 
Elmira township, living on section 32. was born in Roxburghshire, 
Scotland, — the land of the crag and glen, of mountain peak and 
mountain lake, of lowland heath and jdain. of liberty, poetry and 
song, of religious and educational zeal, the home of Wallace and 
Rruce, of Scott and Burns, and the ancestral home of many of 
America's brightest, best and most distinguished men. George Arm- 
strong continued his residence in that country to tlie age of seven 
years and was then brought to tlie United States, the family arriving 
in Kewanee, Illinois. June 4, 18.5.5. 

His parents were James and Sibella (Elliot) Armstrong, also 
natives of Scotland, and on coming to the United States the father 
secured a tract of land on section 32, Elmira township. It was then 
raw prairie covered witli the native grasses, but witli characteristic 
energy he began to break the sod and cultivate the fields, continuing 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBAKA 



If 



■0- -\ 




GKUKGIC Ai;.\iMi;u.\G 




.Mi;s. (iEnKCIC AKM!ST1U.>X(; 



urJiVtk'SITY OF ILLINOIS 
URBANA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 153 

his residence ui)on that phice until liis death, wliich occurred in 1870. 
He was interested in the welfare and progress of the district and 
held some local offices. His wife passed away in 1880. They had a 
family of eight children, as follows: Eli/aheth, iVbel, Adam, Jane 
and Robert, all of whom are deceased; John, who is a resident of 
Henry county, Illinois; James, who has passed away; and George, 
of this review. 

The last named began his education in the schools of Scotland 
and continued his studies in the district schools near his father's 
home. He was early trained to the work of the fields and when his 
father passed away, in 1876, George Armstrong, in connection with 
his two brothers, Adam and Robert, took up the task which their 
father had laid down and he has since carried on general agricultural 
pursuits. He has won notable success, becoming one of the foremost 
agriculturists of his part of the state. From time to time he has 
added to his holdings until he is now the owner of eleven hundred 
and lifty acres and his place is without doubt the best improved farm 
of Ehnira township, and probably of the county. He has always 
engaged in cultivating the crops best adapted to soil and climatic 
conditions here and has engaged quite extensively in feeding stock. 
The value of his judgment in business affairs has been recognized 
by his fellow citizens, who have sought his cooperation in other lines, 
and he is now vice president of the First National Bank of Kewanee 
and Mas one of the charter members of the Union National Bank, 
now the Union State Trust Bank of Kewanee, in which he is still 
interested. 

On the 14.th of October, 1884-. Mr. Armsti-ong wedded Miss Mary 
T. Murray, a native of Scotland and a daughter of Dr. William 
Murray. It was when upon a visit to his native land that JMr. Arm- 
strong formed her acquaintance and they were married there. They 
have a family of five children: Sibella Agnes, the wife of James E. 
Jackson, of Elmira townshij); James M.. Robert E., and William 
M., all at home; and Yictor, a student in Knox College of Galesburg. 

JMr. Armstrong has long been a stalwart champion of the repub- 
lican party and has also stood for prohibition, being ever an advocate 
of the cause of tem]ierance. At the present time he is president of 
the County Prohibition League and he does everything in his power 
to hasten the day when the manufacture and sale of intoxicants will 
be abolished. He is a member of the Presbyterian church and the 
high principles Avhich govern his conduct have made him a man hon- 
ored and respected MJierever known, and most of all where he is 
best known. His is a ntjtably successful careei-, but more than that. 



154 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

it has been notably honorable, for he has never taken advantage of 
the necessities of his fellownien in business affairs, his prosperity 
being won through indefatigable effort, careful management and 
judicious investment. 



THEODORE BACMEISTER, M. D. 

In the death of Dr. Theodore Bacmeister, Stark county lost one 
of its valued and representative citizens and his demise was the occa- 
sion of deep and widespread regret. He passed away March 8, 1911, 
when eighty-one years of age, liis birth having occmTed at Esslingen, 
Wurtemberg, Germany, January 17, 1830. There he was reared to 
the age of eighteen years and obtained good educational op{)ortuni- 
ties. He crossed the Atlantic in 1848, landing in Xew York. His 
training had been in preparation for engineering and after coming 
to the United States he served as a draftsman for a few years but 
later turned his attention to the study of medicine and was graduated 
from the Homeopathic ^Medical College of Pennsylvania in 18.56, 
in which year he turned to the middle west in search of a location. 

Dr. Bacmeister made his way to Toulon, Illinois, which was then 
a small village, and he became one of the pioneer practitioners of 
Stark county. He was thoroughly imbued with the principles of 
homeopathy and ever closely studied the profession that he might 
advance in accordance with the scientific researches which were carried 
on. He traveled over a large territory to meet tlie needs of suffer- 
ing humanity, starting out early in the morning and driving all day. 
His ability was pronounced, for he was very careful in the diagnosis of 
cases and seldom, if ever, at fault in his judgment concerning the out- 
come of disease. He was a valued contributor to many homeopathic 
journals and lie stood for many years as one of the foremost repre- 
sentatives of that brancli of medical science in the middle west. In 
1868 he accepted the chair of materia medica in the Hahnemann 
College of Chicago and for a year was a resident of that city, but in 
tliat time he became convinced that lie uiuch preferred practice in tlie 
country and in the spring of 1869 returned to Toulon, where he 
remained until his death. 

On tlie 19th of April, 1864, Dr. Bacmeister was married to Miss 
Laura L. Ogle, a native of Stark Covmty, born near Toulon, her 
parents being William and Lucretia Ogle, who were among tlie 
earliest settlers of this part of the state, arriving here in 183.5. Her 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 155 

fatlier assisted in laying out Toulon and contributed in marked 
measure to the upbuilding of the county. Following his marriage Dr. 
Racmeister purchased a residence in Toulon, which he rebuilt in 1879, 
converting it into an attractive home. To him and his wife were born 
nine children, six of whom are yet living: Emily F., the wife of Dr. 
Johnson, of Peoria; W. O.; Charles A., of Chicago; Theodore, a well 
known physician and surgeon of Chicago: Louise, the wife of Renja- 
min Younger, of Rloomington ; and Otto, who, after graduating from 
the high school and academy of Toulon and also from Williams Col- 
lege of ^Massachusetts, is now jiostmaster of Toulon. One daughtei', 
I>aura Paidine, reached young womanhood, married A. E. Sundquist, 
but died December 31, 1909. 

Dr. and oNIrs. Racmeister were meml)ers of the JNIethodist Episco- 
])al church, in Avhich he served on the official board. He took an active 
part in both clun-ch and Sunday school work, acting as Sunday school 
superintendent for twelve years. In community affairs he was also 
helpfully interested and Avas pi'csident of the town board and also 
president of the board of education. In a word, he stood for all that 
proved of public benefit and his community numbered him among its 
most valued and worthy citizens. He Avas a consistent member of the 
^Masonic fraternity and enjoyed the fullest regard of his brethren of 
the order. Along professional lines he was connected Avith the local 
medical society, the Illinois State Homeopathic ^Medical Society and 
tlie American Institute of Homeopathy. He regarded his jiro- 
fessional duties seriously, recognizing the great obligation that 
devolved upon him, and he became the loved family physician in many 
a household. Wherever knoAvn he Avas held in high esteem and his 
memory is enshrined in the hearts of all with Avhom he came in con- 
tact. 



ELTIXG ARGANRRIGHT. 

Elting Arganbright, a prominent general merchant of Wyoming, 
oAves his success largely to his determination and his self-reliance, 
Avhich have enabled him to surmount all obstacles and prosper in his 
undertakings. He Avas born in Yinton county, Ohio, October 10, 
18G3. f)f the marriage of Abraham and Susanna (TAveed) Argan- 
bright, also natiA-es of Ohio. His paternal grandfather, Phillip Ar- 
ganbright, Avas born in Germany. Abraham Arganbright devoted his 
life to farming and passed aAvay in his native state as did his Avife. 



156 HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 

Elting Ai'ganbright remained at home until lie was sixteen years 
of age and attended the common schools m the acquirement of an edu- 
cation. He then l)egan providing for his own support and, thinking 
to find better o^jportunities farther west, came to Stark county, Illi- 
nois. He had to spend all of his money for railroad fare but he had 
two sisters living in this county and found work on a farm almost 
immediately after his arrival here. As there was little farm work to 
be (lone during the cold season he attended school in the country 
during the first winter and during the two following winters was a 
student in the ^Vyoming schools, walking in every day fi-om the 
country. He completed the course taught in Wyommg at that time, 
\\hieh was before the schools \vere graded, and he is an honoi-ai-y 
member of the High School Alumni Association. He decided that 
business jiursuits would be more congenial than farming and secured 
a position with King Brothers, merchants, as delivery boy at a wage 
of five dollars per month. He remained with that firm for thirteen 
years and during that time learned thoroughly the pi'incijiles of suc- 
cessful merchandising in a small town. He carefully saved his wages, 
which were advanced from time to time, and on severing his connec- 
tion with that firm purchased a bankrupt stock of goods for t\\enty- 
fi\e hundred dollars. In order to do so he had to sell his house and lot 
and borrow nine hundred dollars. At the end of three months lie 
sold out and purchased an interest in the store owned by H. A. Gal- 
braith and A. G. Hammond, and the firm of Hammond & Argan- 
bright was established. Eleven years later he bought out his partner 
and for nine years has been sole owner of the store. He carries a 
complete hue of general merchandise, selected with a view to the 
especial needs of his community, and his liberal business ])olicy, 
coupled with the high quality of his goods, has commended him to a 
laT'ge patronage. The volume of his trade has increased steadily and 
his enterprise has not only resulted in his attaining financial indepen- 
dence but has also been a factor in the commercial advancement of 
AVyoming. He also owns a third interest in the Scott & Hammond 
block and his residence, which is the old Hammond homestead, is one 
of the most attractive in the city. His motto has always been "I will" 
and he has succeeded in carrying it out, his enterprise and confidence 
in his ability enabling him to work out plans and i)rojects which a less 
determined man would have hesitated to attemjit. 

]\Ir. Arganbright was married in 1894 to ]Miss Xellie Dunla]). a 
native of Canton, Illinois, and a daughter of T. C. Dunlaj). They 
have become the parents of six children, namely; Ernest E., Julia L., 
Eltini^. Jr., Robert and Ruth, twins, and Mvron. 



HISTORY OF STAllK COUNTY 137 

JNIr. Arganbright supports the repul)hcan party at the polls and 
has long been recognized as a leader in public affairs in Wyoming. 
His influence is due not only to his courage in standing firmly and 
o])enly for what he believes to be right but also to his insight into 
conditions and his sound judgment. He has served on the city council 
for two years and is now a member of the school board. Fraternally 
he is connected with the Masons, the Odd Fellows and the ]M(Klcrn 
Woodmen, and he attends and contributes to the support of the Con- 
gregational church. His integrity and honesty have never been 
(juestioned and he has done much to promote the moral progress of 
his community. He has seen clearly the relation between the develop- 
ment of the agricultural resources of the county and the prosperity 
of the merchants of the county and has been a leader in movements to 
promote more scientific farming and served for a considerable period 
as secretary of the Central Agricultural Society, or, as it is some- 
times known, the Wyoming Fair Association. 



W. F. PRICE. 



W. F. Price, who is familiarly called Fred by his hosts of friends 
and is regarded as one of the active and progressive business men of 
Toulon, is the jjresident and manager of the Stark County Telephone 
Comjjany. He is numbered among the old settlers of this part of the 
state, dating his residence in Illinois from 1856 and in Stark county 
from 1869. He was born in Newark, New Jersey, February 11, 
1 8.)3, and his father, W. H. Price, was also a native of that city, boi'ii 
on the .)th of July, 1828. Reared and educated in Newark, he there 
wedded jNIiss INIary Burns, who was also born in that citj^ on the 
11th of February, 1828. After his marriage INIr. Price engaged in 
business in Newark for a number of years and three of his children 
were born there. In 1857 he removed to the west, settling first on a 
faini near Canton, Illinois, where he remained until 1869. when he 
came to Stark county and purchased land whereon he continued his 
agricultural pursuits for a num])er of years. He was a successful 
farmer and well known citizen. In 1905 he purchased a lot in Toulon, 
erected thereon a neat and attractive residence and has since lived 
retired in this city. Here he and his wife have celebrated their 
golden wedding and also their sixty-sixth anniversary February 11, 
1916. They are still a hale and hearty old couple, living by them- 
selves and caring for their own household at the advanced age of 



158 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

eighty-seven years. Both are members of the Toulon JNlethodist 
Ej'iscopal chui'ch and tlieir cliildren have become active workers in 
church and Sunday school. 

W. F. Price arrived in Stark county with his parents when a youth 
of sixteen years and assisted in carrying on the home farm, remaining 
with his father during the period of his minority. On the 27th of 
December, 187-i, he was united in marriage to 3Iiss Anna Quinn, a 
native of Preble county, Ohio, and a daughter of J. II. Quinn, who 
Avas one of the early settlers of this county. He took his bride to the 
old home farm and thereon continued the work of the fields for a 
number of years. ^Vl]ile they were there residing JMrs. Price jiassed 
away on the 12th of Sei)tember, 1902, leaving three children, two sons 
and a daughter. The eldest son, Frank L., is married and now owns 
and operates the old Quinn homestead. The daughter, ]Mary, is the 
wife of INIinott Silliman, a resident farmer of Toulon township, and 
the younger son, William Henry, is married and resides upon one of 
the old Price farms, which belongs to his father. Each son is living 
on the same farm and in the house in which he was born. 

After successfully carrying on general agricultm'al pursuits for 
many years W. F. Price removed to Toulon, where he erected a good 
residence. On the 1.5th of November, 1908, in Peoria, he was united 
in marriage to INIiss Belle Cliff, who was born, reared and educated 
in that city. In 1900 Mr. Price became a stockholder in the INIutual 
Telephone Company of Toulon and later organized the Stark County 
Telephone Company, of which he became president and manager. 
This company has since erected a neat brick office building and busi- 
ness house and INIr. Price has extended the telephone line, which has 
its switchboards in Wyoming, Elmira, Castleton, Camp Grove and 
Dimcan. with headquarters in Toulon. They now have about two 
thousand instruments installed in the county and connect with all 
other lines in Illinois and adjacent states. Mr. Price spends a goodly 
portion of his time on the road with his men. putting in new lines and 
instruments, and he gives most thorough supervision to the business. 
He is also still interested in agricultural jjursuits, for in connection 
\vith his sons he owns a large tract of rich and well improved land near 
Toulon. He has ever been recognized as a progressive and enter- 
prising business man whose plans are well formulated and are carried 
forwai'd to successful completion. 

Mr. Price is a member of the Toulon Baptist churcli. while his 
wife holds membership in the Congregational church. Fraternally he 
is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Toulon. 
He has been a liberal contributor to various churches and to benevolent 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 159 

projects and is a most public-spirited and progressive citizen, inter- 
ested in all those things which pertain to the welfare of the individual 
and the betterment of the community. Those who know him esteem 
him highly and he has a very wide acquaintance throughout the 
countv. 



JACOB H. KOPP. 



Jacob H. Kopp, actively and successfully engaged in general 
farming and stock feeding, was born INIav 7, 1870, on the farm on 

O til • 

section .5, Osceola township, on which he now resides. He is a 
representative of one of the old German families of the county, his 
parents being Jacob and Elizabeth (Kopp) Kopp, who were natives 
of Germany. In early life the father crossed the Atlantic and made 
his way to Stark county, where he continued to engage in farming 
until his death, which occurred July 26, 1886. Securing a tract of land 
on section .5, Osceola township, he placed the first improvements there- 
on and bent his energies to the further development and cultivation 
of his land as the years j^assed by. His widow survives and is now 
living in Bradford. 

In his youthful days Jacob H. Kopp was a pupil in the district 
school near his father's home and through the summer months he 
worked in the fields, becoming more and more actively the assistant of 
his father. Upon the latter's death he assumed the management of 
the home property and is now busily engaged in the cultivation of an 
excellent tract of land of two hundred and seventy-eight acres, in 
addition to which he has eighty acres in Bureau county. His land is 
very valuable and producti\e, bringing forth rich harvests annually 
as a reward for the care and labor which he bestows upon the fields. 
In addition to cultivating the crops best adapted to soil and climate 
he is engaged quite extensively in feeding stock and both branches of 
his business are proving profitable. Upon his farm are the latest 
impi-oved farm implements and machinery. He has a threshing 
machine and corn sheller and everything that will facilitate his work. 

AVhen twenty-fovn- years of age Mr. Kopp was married to ^Nliss 
Anna Tilson and they have become the parents of four children, Jen- 
nie. Stella, ]Mollie and Dorothy, all four daughters being yet at home. 
The parents are members of the Catholic church at Bradford and INlr. 
Ko])p is identified with the IModern Woodmen of America. His 
jinlitical allegiance is given to the republican jDarty but he never seeks 



160 HISTOKV OF STARK COUNTY 

nor desires political office. He has served, however, for three years 
as school director and he is interested in the welfare and jirogress of 
the district, cooperating in well detined plans and measures for the 
general good. 



ELISHA B. BASS. 



The Bass family has been represented in Stark county since 
pioneer times, Elisha B. Bass arriving in this county in 18.54. He 
was a native of Fulton county, New York, born in 1812, and in his 
native state was reared to manhood, after which he married ]Miss 
Eunice Ferguson, who was also born in Xew York. He became a 
farmer of Fulton county and there carried on agricultural pursuits 
for a number of j'ears, during which time four children were born 
to him and his wife. 

At the end of that period ]Mr. Bass determined to try his for- 
tune in the middle west. He had previously visited Illinois when a 
young man, making the trip in 1837, after Avhich he spent two years 
in this state, mostly in Peoria county, although he was also in Stark 
county. He was employed at farm labor by the month, but upon the 
death of his mother he returned to his old home in New York and 
assumed the management of that place. There he remained until 
1854, when he disposed of his property in Fulton county. New York, 
and removed westward to Illinois, making a permanent location in 
Stark county. It was still largely a frontier district, the work of 
improvement and cultivation being then in its initial stages. ]Mr. 
Bass purchased a tax title to a farm of one hundred and sixty acres 
and also purchased an adjoining tract of forty acres, of which farm 
twenty acres had been broken and was placed under cultivation. 
With characteristic energy he began the task of developing the place. 
He turned the first furrows in his fields, fenced his land and con- 
verted the farm into a very productive place. It comprised two 
himdred acres and through his efforts it became a very valuable 
property, his practical labors resulting in the harvesting of good 
crops annually. He also erected substantial Iniildings upon his place 
and made other improvements which added to the attractive appear- 
ance and to the worth of the land. Year by year he continued to 
engage actively in farming until 1877, when he leased his place to his 
son and removed to Toulon, retiring from active business life. He 
then purchased a good residence property and spent his remaining 



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HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 163 

days there in the enjoyment of a rest which he had truly earned and 
richly deserved. 

]Mr. Bass was not only a progressive agriculturist, but was also a 
l^rominent and valued citizen in other connections. His fellow 
townsmen, appreciative of his ability and his worth, calleil him to 
various official positions, including that of member of the town 
Ijoard. In 188.3 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife and 
it was not until almost a quarter of a centvuy later that he passed 
away, his death occurring October 9, 1008, when he had reached the 
remarkably venerable age of ninety-six years. 

To jNIr. and JNIrs. Bass were born a son and three daughters. The 
son, Oscar J. Bass, was reared on the home farm in Stark county, 
afterward leased the place and thus tilled it for a number of jears. 
Later he purchased the property and continued its cultivation for 
some time thereafter, but eventually he sold the farm and removed 
to Henry, where he continued to make his home until his life's labors 
were ended in death October 28, 1915. He left a wife but no chil- 
dren. The three daughters of the family are: Elizabeth, the wife of 
Beason Lambert, a retired farmer living at Columbus Junction; 
Laura, who died in 1908; and Eliza J., to whom we are indebted for 
the material concerning her father and the family. She was reared 
and educated in Stark county and remained with her parents, caring 
for them and a cripjjled sister. She has resided in Toulon since 
1877 and is here widely known and greatly respected, all speaking of 
her in terms of warmest regard. 

Both JNIr. and Mrs. Bass were consistent and faithful members 
of the Baptist church, guiding their lives according to its teachings. 
Their daugliter, Eliza J., is also a member of the church and was 
formerly a teacher and worker in the Sunday school. For more than 
six decades the family has been represented in Stark county and 
tln-oughout the entire period their influence has been found on the 
side of right, i:)rogress and improvement. 



PROFESSOR GEORGE C. BAKER. 

Professor George C. Baker is a well known educator, now serving 
his third term as superintendent of schools in Stark county, liis incum- 
bency in the office covering ten years. His residence in Illinois fiates 
from 1892 and througliout tliis period he has been recognized as one 
wliose efforts have been of marked value in connection with the de- 



164 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

\elopment of the school system. He is a native of Iowa, his birth 
having occurred at Council Bluff's, January 9, 18.56. His father, 
Jacob Warren Baker, was a native of ^"irginia and ^vas born in Feb- 
ruary, 1818, rejjresenting one of the old pioneer families of that state. 
When a young man he removed to the middle west, settling in Iowa, 
and in Farmington, that state, he married ]Miss Caroline Leavit, a 
native of Ohio, who went with her parents to loAva. ]Mr. Baker was 
a saddler by trade and carried on that business in Farmington and in 
other Iowa towns. In 1849 he made an overland trip to California, 
where he was engaged in mining for a time, meeting with fair success. 
He then returned liy way of the Isthmus of Panama to Xe^v York 
and later went to Pike's Peak. For some years he resided in Athens, 
Clark county, ^Missouri, where he lost his wife. He afterward came 
to Toulon and spent his last days in this city. 

Professor Baker was reared in Iowa and jMissouri and olitained 
his primary education in the common schools, but not content with 
the advantages tlius far received, he continued his studies without a 
tutor and prepared for teaching, which he began in the country schools 
of ]Missom'i when quite young. He was also engaged in merchandis- 
ing for a time l)ut afterward gave up that pursuit and again 
concentrated his energies upon educational work, following the pro- 
fession of teaching in the country schools of JMissouri and Iowa. He 
afterward secured the position of principal of the school at Hamilton, 
Illinois, and so satisfactory was his service there that he was retained 
in tlie position for nine consecutive years. He afterward became 
princijjal of tlie schools of Toulon, continuing as such for five years, 
and in 1906 he was nominated and elected superintendent of schools 
of Stark county. In 1910 he was reelected and again in 1914, so that 
he is now serving for the third term, his incumbency to continue until 
1918. There are now seventy schools in the county, with one hundred 
and seven teachers, and Avhen he entered uj^on his present position 
thei-e were but ninety-two teachers in the county. There are also 
added school buildings and most of these are well equipj^ed, while the 
teachers are efficient and well qualified for their work. Professor 
Baker devotes his entire time to his official duties and he maintains a 
county institute for the further training of the teachers. 

On the 15th of Januaiy, 1882, in Clark County, jMissouri. Pro- 
fessor Baker was united in marriage to IMiss Emma Fenten, a native 
of JMissouri, born in JMontgoniery county, as was her father. George 
Fenten, who was of English i)arentage. ]Mr. and JMrs. Baker became 
the ])arents of four cliildren: Edgar, now living in Alberta. Canada: 
iMargaret. a successful teacher of Stark county: Clarence, a business 



HISTORY OF STAllK COUNT T 165 

nian of Toulon; and Kalpli, an electrician holding a iJosition with the 
]ilectric Light & Power Company of Toulon. 

Professor Baker holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal 
church, in which he is serving on the official board and also is Sunday 
school superintendent. He does everything in his power to promote 
the moral progress of the community and his active work in the 
church has done much to promote its growth and extend its influence. 
His entire life in fact has been given to the betterment of the in- 
dividual. He believes that the object of education is to train each 
indi^■idual to reach the highest perfection possible for him and that the 
purpose of teaching is to develop capacity. He holds a life diploma- 
which entitles him to teach in anj' school in Illinois and he is today 
regarded as one of the most successful educators of the state. His 
own advantages were very limited. He was never in a high school 
until after he was elected principal of the school at Hamilton, Init 
when it was no longer possible for him to pursue his studies in a school- 
room he marked out a line of study for himself and throughout his 
entire life has been a student, until he is now recognized as a man of 
scholarly attainments with whom association means expansion and 
elevation. 



P. B. COLWELL. 



P. B. Colwell, the efficient and jjopular postmaster of Wyoming, 
wds born in Essex township, Stark county, on the 1.3th of July, 18.56, 
a son of Henry Colwell, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this 
work. He was reared u])on the home farm and attended the common 
schools in the acquirement of an education. ^Vhen seventeen years of 
age he became a school teacher and after teaching for one year in 
Valley township went to Peoria county, where he followed that i)r()- 
fession for three j'ears. He then spent one year in Chicago in the 
employ of the Deering Binder Company and then went on the road 
foi- that corporation as salesman. He was later in St. Louis for a 
year and for a similar jjeriod of time was at Helena, INIontana, after 
which he returned to Stark county and began farming the home- 
stead in Essex townshi]). He devoted fourteen years to the opera- 
tion of that place and then turned his attention to the grain business, 
being active in that connection for a year at La Fayette and for eight 
years at Wyoming. On the 24th of April, 1914, he was made post- 
master of ^Vyoming and has since concentrated his energies upon the 



166 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

discharge of his duties, proving a sj'steniatic, accurate and courteous 
official. 

31r. Cohvell married ^liss Cecelia Burns, a native of Peoria 
county, this state, and a daughter of Peter and Anna Burns, botli of 
whom are deceased. Five children have been born to this marriage, 
namely: Henry, at home; Louise, who is teaching at St. Anthony,- 
Idaho; Clara, a school teacher of Rupert, Idaho; Miles, at home: and 
JNIargaret, who is assistant postmaster. 

Mr. Colwell has supported the democratic party since age con- 
ferred ujjon him the right of franchise and for eight years represented 
Essex township on the board of county sui)ervisors. Fraternally he 
belongs to the jNIodern ^Voodmen of America at AVyoming. All of 
his various undertakings have proved successful as he possesses good 
business judgment, is enterprising and gives close attention to the 
matter in liand, and he is in comfortable circumstances. 



H. D. D. MARTIX. 



Among the well known public men of Stark county is H. D. D. 
iNIartin. who is the present county treasurer — an official capable and 
prompt in the discharge of his duties and loyal at all times to the 
trust rei^osed in him. He was born in Peoria county, Illinois, 
July 27, I80I. Henry INIartin, his father, was a native of Canada 
and was a son of Squire INIartin, who removed from that country to 
the United States with his family and settled in Peoria, Illinois, about 
the year 1829, being munbered among the earliest residents of that 
city, which in fact, was but a village at the time of his arrival there. 
He preempted land, broke the sod and tilled the fields, opening up 
and developing a fine farm. His son, Henry ]NIartin, was reared in 
Peoria and ]NIarshall counties, where the family home was main- 
tained at different times, and after arriving at years of maturity 
was married in Peoria county to jNIiss Eliza Jane Sommers. He 
afterward made his home in Peoria and ]NIarshall counties until 1861, 
when he removed to Henry, where he engaged in the manufacture of 
carriages and buggies, carrying on business there for a number of 
years. While there residing he lost his wife and later he joined a 
daughter in Saybrook, after wliich he lived retired from business 
there for a number of years. Subsequently he came to the home of hi.« 
son, H. D. D. Martin, in Wyoming, and with him spent his last years. 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 167 

He was long a respected and worthy citizen of this part of the state 
and enjoyed the merited regard for all with whom he came in contact. 

H. D. D. ^lartin was reared upon the old home faini in ^Marshall 
county and completed his education by graduating from the high 
school of Henry, Illinois. He afterward learned the trade of carriage 
and huggy making with his father and subsequently removed to 
C'astleton, this county, where he conducted a manufacturing and 
repair business, remaining there for twelve years. He then disposed 
of his shop and went to \Vyoming, where he built another shop and 
began the manufacture of carriages, wagons and buggies, also doing- 
general repair work of that character. For five years he remained at 
Wyoming and then sold out, after which he concentrated his efforts 
upon merchandising, in which field of business he continued active for 
fourteen years. In 1914 he was nominated and elected treasurer of 
Stark county and removed to Toulon, assuming the duties of his 
position in December of that year. He had previously served in a 
number of positions of public honor and trust, continuing for some 
years as townshij) clerk and also as townshij) collector for two terms. 
He has ever lieen prompt and faithful as a ])ublic official and over his 
record there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. 

]Mr. Martin was united in marriage in Vallej' township. Stark 
county, in 1877, to INIiss IMary E. Job, who was born and reared in 
this county, where her father, David Job, settled at a very early day. 
Mrs. ]Martin passed away in Castleton and in Wyoming iNIr. INIartin 
was married to ^liss IMary Haywood, also a native daughter of Stark 
county and for a number of j'cars a successful teacher, being con- 
nected with the schools of Wyoming in that capacity for eight years. 

Mr. and ]Mrs. 3Iartin are faithful members of the Congregational 
church of Toulon and he has been a very active church and Sunday 
school worker for many years, serving for twelve years as superinten- 
dent of the Sunday school at Castleton, also as superintendent of the 
Congregational Sunday school in Wyoming for some years. He 
still takes an active interest in the various l)ranches of church woi-k, 
particularly in the religious training of the young, believing iti the 
wisdom of Solomon: "Train a child in the way he should go and 
when he is old he will not depart from it." He has accomplished 
much good in his ^Sunday school work and for fifteen years he has 
been ])resident of the Sunday School Association which is maintained 
in Stark county. He is continually alert to improve upon methods of 
religious instruction that the young people may be fortified for life's 
tpm])tations and its responsibilities, and the influence of his example 
as well as for his precept has been strongly and widely felt. There 



1C8 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

are few residents of Stark county more widelj^ known and none are 
held in liigher esteem tlian H. D. D. JNIartin, for whom his feHow 
citizens entertain the warmest regard, for his life has ever measured 
up to the highest standards of manhood and citizenship. He never 
boasts of his own worth. In fact he is entirely free from ostentation 
and dis])lay, but wlienever his fellowmen mention liim, it is in terms 
of admiration and regard. 



ALBERT DEYO. 

Albert Deyo has long been active in business in Bradford, giving 
his attention to the work of well drilling. He represents one of the 
old families of Stark county, his l)irth having occurred in Osceola 
township on the 24th of IMay, 1869, his parents being Josiah and 
Julia (Hayden) Deyo. The father was born in New Paltz, New 
York, while the mother's birth occurred in INIaine. They were 
married in Illinois, the father having come to Stark county in 18.34.. 
He secured a tract of land which he converted into an excellent farm, 
making his home thereon until his death. The family come of Hugue- 
not ancestry. 

^Vlbert Deyo attended school in Bradford, supplementing his 
pu])lic school training by a commercial course. His early practical 
experience came to him through the work of the farm, on which he 
continued to reside nntil he reached the age of twenty-four years, 
when he removed to Bradford. For two years he was engaged in 
clerking in a store and since that time has been engaged in the well 
digging business. This has made heavy demands u])on his time, kee])- 
ing him constantly busy, and through his earnest and intelligently 
directed efforts he has won substantial success. 

In 1894 ]Mr. Deyo Avas married to Miss Rena Bevier. mIio was 
born in Osceola township, this county, a daughter of ]Mordeeai and 
Adelaide (Bradford) Bevier, w'ho came from Biisghamton. New 
York, to this county at an early period in its develo])ment. arriving 
about 18.'54. Securing a tract of land, the father l)ent his energies to 
the cultivation of a farm. He carried on general farming for a con- 
siderable period but later concentrated his energies upon the raising 
of vegetables and fruit. He was (juite prominent in the community, 
holding some local offices, including that of supervisor, in which posi- 
tion he remained for a number of years. At the time of the Civil war 
he responded to the country's call for aid, enlisting as a member of 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 169 

Company K, Sixty-third Illinois Infantry, with which he rendered 
valuable service to his country. He died in the spring of 191'i, having- 
for seven years survived his wife, who passed away in 1905. Their 
daughter, JNIrs. Devo, was reared and educated in Bradford and bv 
her marriage has become the mother of five children: Doris, who was 
graduated from the high school of Bradford in the class of 1914< and 
is now attending the Nebraska State Ujiiversity at Lincoln; INIariau, 
who is a senior in high school; Eleanor, Jeanette and Bradford, all in 
school. 

jNIr. Deyo exercises his right of franchise in support of the men 
and measures of the republican ]5arty and is active in supporting its 
principles, having firm belief in their efficiency as factors in good 
government. For one year he filled the office of mayor of Bradford. 
He belongs to the Woodmen lodge and he and his wife are consistent 
and faithful members of the IVIethodist church, doing all in their 
power to iHomote its growth and extend its influence. Mr. Deyo has 
erected a fine residence in Bradford and the home is moreover very 
attractive by reason of its warm-hearted hospitality, which is greatly 
enjoyed by the many friends of the family. 



& 



WILLIAINI E. GRIEVE. 

For twenty-nine years William E. Grieve occupied a farm on 
section 30, Elmira township, having there a tract of four hundred 
and eighty acres of good land. In 1916, however, he put aside the 
more active work of the fields and took up his abode at his present 
place of residence. He is now living retired and the rest that lias 
come to him is well merite'd. He was born in Toulon township, this 
county, September 8, 18.59, his parents being Robert and Ellen 
(Scott) Grieve, both of whom were natives of Scotland, whence they 
came to the new world with their respective ])arents. Their marriage 
was celebrated in Stark county and throughout his remaining days the 
father was actively engaged in farming in Toulon township, where 
he jiassed away twelve or fifteen years ago. 

The boyhood experiences of William E. Grieve were those which 
usually fall to the lot of the farm lad. He was educated in the com- 
mon schools near his father's home and when not busy with his text- 
books worked in the fields, being thus employed to the age of twenty- 
six years. After his marriage in the s])ring of 1886 he removed to 
a farm belonging to his father, there remaining for one year, after 



170 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

which he took up his abode in Khiiira township, near the viUage of 
lihnira. Extending the boundaries of liis place by additional pur- 
chase, he became the owner of four hundred and eighty acres, consti- 
tuting one of the excellent farms of the locality, and thereon he 
resided for twenty-nine years, being actively and successfully engaged 
in general agricultural pursuits during that period. In 191G he re- 
moved to his present place of residence on section 30, Elmira town- 
ship, having put aside active business cares. 

In 1886 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Grieve and JNliss 
Esther A. Oliver, by whom he has four children, namely : Ellen Eliza- 
beth, who is the wife of Chester Jackson and resides near her father's 
place; Andrew R., living on the home farm; Clarion S., also at home; 
and Flavel. who is a student in Knox College of Galesburg. 

^Ir. Grieve votes with tlie republican party and is a trustee of the 
Presbyterian church, in which he and his wife hold membership. His 
has been a well spent life guided by honorable principles, and his up- 
right manhood and sterling citizenship have gained for hini the warm 
regard of those Avith whom he has been brought in contact. 



JOHX ^V. FLING, Jr. 



John W. Fling, Jr.. one of the leading attorneys at the Stark 
county bar, is the only representative of his profession in \Vyoming. 
He was born in Cmnberland, ISIarion county, Indiana, on the 22d of 
January, 1878, a son of John W. and Rebecca (Bolander) Fling, 
likewise natives of that i)lace. The father engaged in farming in 
Indiana until 1885, when he came to Stark county, Illinois, and took 
up his residence at Wyoming. For many years he has served as a 
section hand for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad, mak- 
ing an excellent record for efficiency in tliat connection. 

John W. Fling. Jr., was graduated from the Wyoming high 
school in 1898 and for three years thereafter followed the profession 
of teaching. Having determined to make the jjractice of law his life 
work, he pursued his legal studies under the direction of F. A. Kerns 
and on the 13th of 3Iay, 1903, was admitted to practice by the supreme 
court of Illinois. On the 1st of July of that year he was taken into 
partnership by his former precejitor and this relation Avas maintained 
until May, 1912. In November of that year our subject Avas elected 
state's attorney for Stark county and his record in that connection 
reflects credit upon his legal knowledge, his aggressiveness and his 




JUIIX W. FLIXG, .In. 



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HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 173 

power of convincing argument. He has built up a large and repre- 
sentative private liractice and his ability is recognized not only by the 
general liublic but also bj^ his professional brethren. 

;Mr. Fling was married November 22, 1904, to JNIiss ]Mamie JNIc- 
Clynient, also a native of this county and likewise a graduate of the 
Wyoming high school. They have a son, Richard A. 

Mr. Fling has given careful study to the problems of government 
and is convinced that the policies of the republican party are best 
calculated to secure the permanent prosperity of the country. He 
is a consistent member of the jSIethodist Episcopal church and frater- 
nally he belongs to the local lodges of the jNIodern Woodmen of 
America, the JNIasons and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. 
He realizes the importance of good schools in a democracy and as 
president of the board of education has done much to bring about the 
advancement of the local schools. He is an ardent admirer of Abra- 
ham Lincoln and has collected what is pi-obably the largest Lincoln 
library in the state. The gratifying success which he has gained is 
especially noteworthy in that he has depended entirely upon his own 
resources and upon well directed industry in the struggle for profes- 
sional advancement. 



CHARLES D. STURM. 

An excellent farm of one hundred and sixty acres situated on sec- 
tion .5, Osceola township, pays tribute to the care and labor bestowed 
ujjon it by its owner, Charles D. Sturm, who has devoted his entire 
life to general agricultural pursuits, meeting w^ith very desirable suc- 
cess in his undertakings. He is a representative of one of the old 
]Moncer families of the county, his birth having occurred on section 
l(j. Osceola township, on the 18th of ]\Iay, 18.5.5, his parents being- 
Isaac and Jane (Stedhani) Sturm. The father was born in Shelby 
county, Ohio, November 11, 1824, and was a son of Henry and Kath- 
rine (Dalrimple) Stui-m, both of whom were of German descent. 
Henry Stvn-m was born October 17, 1791, in Kentucky, and was 
married in Shelby county, Ohio, in 1814 to Kathrine Dalrimple, who 
was ])orn in South Carolina, February .5. 1799. It was on the 2,5th of 
September, 1836, that they became residents of Illinois. Here Isaac 
Stm-m grew to manhood and was married March 11. 1849, to IMiss 
Jane Stedham. the wedding ceremony being performed by Joshua 
Gillfillen, justice of the peace. INIrs. Sturm was born in Wilmington, 



174 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

Delaware, February 7, 1830, and came to Illinois in 1889. Her 
parents were John and JNIaria (Robson) Stedhani, both natives of 
Delaware, the former born in 1797 and the latter in 180G. They 
were married in New Jersey in 182.5. JNIr. Stedham was of Irish and 
Swedish descent. He came to Ilhnois in 1833. 

After his marriage Isaac Sturm became a resident of Boyd's 
Grove, Illinois, but after two years removed to Osceola township, 
Stark county, settling upon a farm on section 16 in 18.51. ]Mrs. Sturm 
had come to Illinois witli an uncle from ^Vilmington, Delaware, 
traveling in a wagon drawn by a single horse. She was then a girl of 
about nine or ten years and to lighten the load she Avalked about half 
of the way. Her father gave her uncle a quarter section of land near 
the present home of Charles D. Sturm in payment for her rearing 
mitil she was fourteen years of age, after M'liicli slie kept house for her 
father at the place where Charles D. Sturm now resides. In 1851 
Mr. and JMrs. Isaac Sturm located on the farm where tlieir son 
Charles was born. Tliere they resided for a long period but eventually 
removed to the town of Bradford, where ]Mr. Sturm jxissed away 
December 11, 1901, at the age of seventy-seven years and one month. 
For sixty-five years he Avas a resident of Ilhnois, and for almost fifty- 
three years he and his wife traveled life's journey together. He was a 
democrat in his political views and was called upon to serve in many 
local offices, the duties of whicli he discharged with promptness, fidelity 
and capability. In his business affairs he displayed excellent manage- 
ment, keen discernment and unfaltering enterprise, and was a self- 
made man whose labors were attended with substantial success. 
Fraternally he was connected witli tlie ^Masons, having membership 
in the lodge at Bradford. 

Charles D. Sturm was educated in the common schools of Osceola 
township and remained upon the home farm until he reached the age 
of twenty-seven years, during which time his experience in all depart- 
ments of farm work well prepared liim for the conduct of farming 
interests on his own account. On leaving home he first settled on 
section 17, Osceola township, where he remained for nine years and 
then came to his present location on section .5. During the inter- 
vening period he has made excellent improvements u])on the land, has 
remodeled the liouse and lias built good barns and other outbuildings, 
personally doing the work of construction. He owns in the home farm 
one hundred and sixty acres of rich and productive land, all of whicli 
he has brought under a high state of cultivation, and he also has one 
liundred and sixty acres in Neponset township. Bureau county. 

Mr. Sturm was married wlien twenty-six j-ears of age to ^Sliss 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 175 

JNIinerva J. Ames, a daughter of JNlajor Andre and Maria (Barber) 
Ames. Her father was born in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, in 
1809, and came to La Salle county, IlUnois, in 1831. He owned and 
operated a farm near Bradford, Stark county, and in the early days 
was well ac(|uainted with the old Indian chief Shabbona, who was a 
great friend of the white people. To JNIr. and JNIrs. Ames were born 
seven children who reached man and womanhood and all are still 
living. The mother died when the children were small, but Mr. Ames 
readied an advanced age, jjassing away in 1888. 

jNIr. and JNIrs. Sturm have a hospita])le home whose good cheer is 
greatly enjoyed by their many friends. In politics JNIr. Sturm is a 
reiJublican and for one term he filled the office of assessor but other- 
wise has never sought nor held positions of political preferment, desir- 
inff rather to sive his undivided time and attention to his business 
interests, which are carefully and wisely managed. 



DAVID K. FELL. 



Death often removes from our midst those whom we can ill afford 
to lose, and such was the feeling throughout Stark county when David 
K. Fell was called from this life, for he was regarded as one of the 
progressive and public-spirited citizens of the county, having for a 
long period been one of the active and progressive farmers of Goshen 
township. He was born in Roxburghshire. Scotland, November 22, 
1842, and was a youth of ten years when in 18;52 he came to the United 
States, making his way direct to Illinois, at which time he joined 
friends living in Elmira, Stark county. He made the voyage and 
journeyed across the country in company witli his parents and the 
family home was established in tlie Scotch settlement. There D. K. 
Fell was reared to manhood upon tlie home farm, having the usual 
exjieriences of the farm-bred boy who early began his work in the 
field. His school privileges were quite limited and he was largely 
a self-educated as well as self-made man. but in the course of years he 
became well read and developed excellent business ability. In early 
manliood he took up farm work as a liveliliood, l)eing employed l)y the 
month, but lie was ambitious to engage in Inisiness on his own account 
and \itilized every opportunity that led to advancement. 

On tlie 9th of August, 1867. ]Mr. Fell was united in marriage to 
INIiss Helen Jackson, also a native of Scotland, whence she was 
brouglit to the new world when but four years of age. Her father, 



176 HISTORY OF STAllK COUNTY 

Thomas Jackson, was born and reared in the hind of hills and heather, 
as was his wife, JNIrs. Isabella Jackson. On bidding adieu to friends 
and native country they sailed for the new world and became members 
of the Scotch settlement at Elmira, Stark county, where their daugh- 
ter spent her girlhood days. 

Following his marriage ]Mr. Fell settled upon a farm in Goshen 
township, beginning the improvement of one hundred acres of laiul 
near Toulon. His persistent and energetic efforts soon wrought a 
marked transformation in the appearance of his place, and he con- 
tinued his farm work with excellent success, adding to his j)roperty 
from time to time as his financial resources increased until he was the 
owner of four hundred acres all in one body but divided into two farms 
with two sets of buildings thereon, including residences, barns and all 
the necessary outbuildings for the shelter of grain, stock and farm 
machinery. In addition to tilling the s(m1 he devoted considerable time 
to buying and shipping stock and built up a Inisiness of considerable 
l^roportions. Year by year his success increased and he was regarded 
as one of the foremost agriculturists of his community until 1900, 
when he left the farm and removed to Toulon. Here he became one 
of the organizers of the State Bank and was made vice president of 
that institution. He also assisted in the organization of the Kewanee 
State Bank and remained as its vice president, as well as vice presi- 
dent of the Toulon bank, until his death, which occurred October 4, 
1913. Upon removing to the city he purchased a lot and erected tliere- 
on a commodious and attractive residence built in modern style of 
architecture, thus providing a most attractive home for his family. 

To JNIr. and Mrs. Fell Avere born seven children: Adam, who is 
now a traveling salesman residing in Peoria; Thomas and William, 
who are upon the Fell farm; Shubeal, who is engaged in business at 
Toulon; Jennet, the wife of Henry Burns, a resident farmer of 
Adams county, Illinois; Elizabeth, the wife of James Beadleman; and 
Mary, the wife of Claud Kean, a business man of Evanston, Illinois. 

D. K. Fell was a stalwart supporter of the republican ])arty but 
would never seek or hold office. He belonged to Toulon I>odge, 
I. O. O. F., served through the chairs and became a past grand, wh\\t 
both he and his wife were connected with the Rebekah degree and Mrs. 
Fell is also a member of the Woman's Relief Corps. She belongs to 
the Congregational church, of which INIr. Fell was an active member 
and a generous supporter. He also gave liberally to benevolent proj- 
ects and was at all times a public-spirited citizen, cooperating heartily 
and earnestly in every movement that promoted the benefit of the 
conuuunity. For some years prior to his death he was in ill health 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 177 

and traveled quite extensively in various parts of the country. He 
\isited Plot Springs, ^Vrkansas, a number of times and with his wife 
visited Denver and other parts of Colorado, also Washington, D. C, 
and different points in the east. His travels added largely to his 
knowledge, for he possessed an observing eye and retentive memory. 
He never regarded lightly the obligations and duties of life and he 
was one who derived much joy from the companionship of faniily 
and friends. His death therefore was the occasion of deep and wide- 
s])read regret when he ^vas called away. He left behind him a memory 
which is enshrined in the hearts of all who knew him and his life record 
should largely serve as a source of inspiration and encouragement to 
others, showing that success and an honored name may be won 
simnltaneouslv. 



H. P. HOPKINS. 



H. P. IIo])kins, who has been engaged in the lumber business in 
Bradford since 1884, is now vice president of the E. W. Houghton 
Lumber Company, which owns eight yards in this and adjoining- 
counties. His birth occiUTed in Allegany county. New York, on the 
•i.)th of July, 1841, and his parents, Ezra M. and Fanny (Stacy) 
Ho])kins. A\ere nati\'es of Rochester, Vermont, where they were reared 
and married. Subse(iuently a removal was made to Allegany county. 
New York, aiid there the father devoted his time to farming and 
daiiying interests until 1806, when he came west with his family. He 
jiassed away three years later when he had reached the age of sixty- 
six years and his denu'se was regretted by those who had come in close 
contact with him, for he was a man of sterling worth. For twenty- 
two years he served as justice of the peace in New York, and he was 
a lifelong member and for many years a deacon in the Presbyterian 
church. His wife, who was also an active church worker, passed away 
when sixty-five years old. 

H. P. Hojikins is the sixth in order of birth in a family of seven 
childi'cn. He has one sister living, Mrs. Fannie Thompson, a resi- 
dent of Buda, Illinois. He grew to manhood in New York and after 
attending the common schools became a student in the Rushford 
Academy. In 18G.3 he came to Illinois and was here connected with 
the map business, but ti-ade being dull, he turned his attention to other 
work, teaching during the winter months in INIilo township. The 
following spring and summer he was employed in delivering a state 



178 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

map of Illinois and the next year he began farming in Milo township. 
In the fall he resumed teaching and continued to follow that profes- 
sion until 1870. The summers, however, were devoted to farming in 
Milo township, but at length he decided that other pursuits would be 
more congenial and in 1870 he removed to Bradford and became a 
member of the firm of White & Hopkins, proprietors of a drug store. 
I^ater he also engaged in the clothing business, retaining, however, his 
interest in the drug store, which was managed by his partner, ]Mr. 
White. In February, 1884, ]Mr. Hopkins became associated with 
the E. ^y. Houghton Lumber Companj^ which was incorporated not 
long afterward, and he was made manager of the yards at Bradford. 
He has since remained with the company ami in 1901 was made vice 
l)resident. Following the death of INIr. Houghton, in 1912, he acted 
as president until January, 191.'3, when W. O. Houghton was elected 
president, since which time ^Ir. Hopkins has confined his attention to 
his duties as vice jjresident. He understands the various phases of the 
business thoroughly, keeps in close touch with the trade and has had 
much to do witli the growth and success of the concern. The com- 
])any owned a half interest in both elevatoi's at Bradford for several 
years and shipped a large amount of grain annually. Their home 
ofl^ce is in Bradford and in addition to their yard there they own yards 
at Gah a. Altona, Wyoming, Wyanette, Lamoille, Van Orin and Vic- 
toria, while they formerly also had a yard at Princeton but sold that 
to L. R. Davis and Ezra W. Hopkins, a son of our subject. 

3Ir. Hopkins was married in 1869 at Rushford, Xew York, to 
IMiss A^iola W. AVhite, a daughter of Washington White and a native 
of Rushfoi'd. To this union have been born three children: Ezra W., 
who is a member of the firm of Hopkins & Davis, owners of the 
Pi-inceton lumlier yard: Carrie INIay. who died when seventeen years of 
age: and Harla, who is manager of the lumber yard at Bradford and 
is also engaged in farming and dairying. 

Mrs. Hopkins is a well educated woman, having attended the 
schools of Rushford and Clinton Seminary, and for two years was a 
teacher in Rushford Academy. While her husband was postmaster 
of Bi'adford she was his able assistant. She has taken an active part 
in the work of a number of organizations, having served as president 
of the Woman's Relief Corps of Bradford and as worthy matron of 
the local chapter of the Order of Eastern Star, and having been an 
active worker in the Baptist church and Sunday school. 

]Mr. Hopkins has given his political support to the republican 
])aity since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and during 
the last vear of President Harrison's administration he was appointed 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 179 

postmaster, an office which he capably filled for four years. He was 
also ])resident of the town board for several years and has likewise 
served as township trustee. The confidence which the public has 
placed ill liini has always been justified, as he has considered public 
office a public trust and has discharged his duties with a conscientious 
regard for the ])ublic welfare. He is now supervisor of his township. 
He belongs to Bradfonl Lodge, No. .514., A. F. & A. JNL; and \Vyo- 
ming Chapter, No. 183, R. A. M. He is one of the leading 
business men of Bradford and also one of its most popular citizens, 
as his attractive personal (jualities and his ])roved integrity have gained 
him the warm regard of all who lune been closely associated with 
him. He has passed his seventy-fifth birthday and is yet keen of 
mind and vigorous of body and retains also the spirit and courage of 
youth. 



LEVI FULKS. 



Illinois is the center of the great farming industry of the country 
and Stark county is one of the rich agricultural districts of the state. 
Thi'oughout his entire life Levi Fulks has been identified with the 
work of tilling the soil, which George Washington said "is the most 
useful as well as the most honorable occupation of man." He lives 
on section 1(5, Osceola township, and it was upon this section that he 
was l)orn ^Nlarch 9, 1867, his parents being I^evi and Rachel (Medaris) 
Fulks, who Avere natives of Ohio, in which state they were reared and 
married. On removing westward they settled in Illinois in the fall of 
18.)0, establishing their home in Osceola township. Afterward they 
lived for two years at Boyd's Grove and then settled on section 16, 
Osceola township, where their remaining days were passed. The 
father reached the notable old age of ninety years, his birth having 
occurred on the 12th of October, 1824, while he passed away on the 
16th of June, 101.5. His wife died November 3, 1899, and both were 
laid to rest in the Osceola Grove cemetery. 

Ivcvi Fidks prepared for hfe's practical duties as a common school 
pupil and lived at home through the period of his boyhood and youth. 
In fact he has always remained upon the old homestead. His father 
has acquired several hundred acres of land and the labors of Levi 
Fulks were needed in the further development, cultivation and im- 
prf)vement of the farm. He has always carried on the work of general 
farming and today owns and cultivates an excellent tract of land of 
eio'litv acres. 



180 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

In 1898 Mr. Fulks was united in marriage to ^Nliss Florence Hall, 
and they have become the parents of two children. Nora Maybel and 
]Myra Fern. ]Mrs. Fulks was born in Osceola township, a daughter of 
John and jSIary C. (Grife) Hall. Her father was born at Broad- 
bottom, Fngland, and in 18.5.5 crossed the Atlantic to the United 
States, after which he made his way at once into the interior of the 
country, settling in Osceola township, Stark county. He was then a 
youth of sixteen years and he began work as a farm hand, being thus 
employed until after the outbreak of the Civil war. when in response to 
the call of his adopted country for aid he enlisted in 1862 as a memljer 
of the One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, with 
Avhich he served for three years. His army experience, with all of its 
hardships and privations, largely undermined his health and he never 
recovered his normal condition. At the close of the Avar he returned 
home and was married in 1870. He afterward lived in Osceola town- 
ship imtil about twenty-one years ago, when he removed to south- 
western ]Missovn'i, where he passed away in 1896, while his wife died 
in 1897. Their daughter, Mrs. Fulks, was educated in the common 
schools of Osceola township and in the State Xormal School at Xor- 
mal, Illinois, after which she took up the profession of school teach- 
ing, which she followed in Illinois and Missoiu'i for ten years. 

jNIr. Fulks is a member of the jNIodern Woodmen of American and 
he gives his political allegiance to the democratic party. Both he and 
his wife are widely known in this county and have a circle of friends 
almost coextensive with the circle of their acquaintance, for their many 
good qualities have won for them warm regard. 



THOMAS J. KIDD. 



Thomas J. Kidd is the proprietor of the RivervicAv Farm, a well 
imjiroved proj^erty in Elmira township. He was born in that town- 
ship, Xovember 7, 1871, and is a brother of Joseph Kidd. mentioned 
elsewhere in this work. He was educated in the Grove school and 
remained at home until twenty-one years of age, when he secured 
employment as a farm hand, devoting three years to that work. He 
then returned home and again aided in the cultivation of that jilace 
up to the time of his marriage, when he removed to his present farm 
on section 22, Elmira township. Here he built a small house, but in 
the intervening period he has made many changes in the appeai-ance 
of the place by reason of the excellent improvements A\hich he has 




.lA.Mi;^ Kini) 




iU;. AM) .MKS. IIKHIAS .1. KIDI) 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOiS 
URBANA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 183 

put upon it. He today owns two hundred acres of rich and produc- 
tive land, and the Riverview Farm is one of the fine properties of the 
locahty. He has brought his fields to a high state of cultivation and 
annually gathers substantial harvests. 

On the 2-ith of November, 1897, ]Mr. Kidd was united in marriage 
to ]Miss ]Mar}' 31cLennan, and they have become the parents of four 
children: John Everett, who died at the age of nine Aveeks; Sarali 
Sophia, at home; James William, who died when three years old; and 
Leah ]Mae, at home. Mr. Kidd has membership with the INIodern 
Woodmen of America but concentrates his attention and energies 
almost entirely vipon his business affairs and through his close appli- 
cation and industry has won a gratif jdng measure of success. 



HENRY COLWELL. 



Henry Colwell, Avho became one of the pioneer settlers of Essex 
township. Stark county, where he engaged in farming for many years, 
was born in Ross county, Ohio, on the •20th of April, 1813, and almost 
reached the age of eighty-seven years, dying on the 4th of ]March, 
1900. It was in the fall of 1836 that he and his brother, Presley 
Colwell, and their wives came to Illinois from the Buckeye state and 
settled in what is now Essex township. Stark county, though then a 
part of Putnam county. The following year their father, Thomas 
Colwell, and the rest of their brothers and sisters came from their 
home in Ohio and settled in the vicinity. Henry and Presley Colwell 
lived the first winter in a log cabin on section 1.5, Essex township, on 
land now owned by William Cornell, near the place where the first 
settlement was made in Stark county by Isaac B. Essex in 1829 and 
near where the first school Avas built in Stark comity in 1834. In 1837 
Presley Colwell moved to section 21, Essex township, where he had 
bouglit land and where he lived until the fall of 1868, when he sold out 
and removed to Nodaway county, Missouri. Pie died at his home 
tliere a few years later. 

In the fall of 1838 Plenry Colwell removed to a farm which he 
had bought on section 30, Essex township, where he lived for a 
numlier of years, or until he traded farms with John INIartindale, 
wliereby he became the owner of the southwest quarter of section 29. 
Essex township. The farm is known as the old Henry Colwell home- 
stead and it is still owned by Henry Colwell's heirs. He was closely 
connected with the growth and development of Stark county. 



18i HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

He very early knew the need of education. Besides being greatly 
interested in the conimon sehools of his township, with a number of 
others he contributed hberally to the buikhng of Lonil)ar(l University 
at Galesburg, lUinois. The Colwell family still hold a scholalrship in 
that institution as a recompense for the money contributed by Mr. 
Colwell. His son George was one of the first enrolled as a student 
in the university. Henry Colwell had a very large acquaintance 
throughout the surrounding country, as he was one of the first auction- 
eers in Stark county and tlie only one for many miles around. He 
was one of the foremost farmers. He Avith others organized the 
Stark County Agricultural Society in 18.53, which held successful 
fairs at Toulon for more than thirty years, doing much good in the 
advancement of agricultine in the county. He filled the office of presi- 
dent of the society for many years with credit to himself and benefit 
to the society. He also held several offices in tlie township and credit- 
ably ])erformed his duties. He was supervisor of Essex townsiiip at 
the time the railroad was l)uilt in Stark county. 

]Mr. Colwell was one of those eai'ly ])ioiieers who had tlie experience 
of hauling grain to the Chicago market and it was almost impossible 
to get any money for their jjroduce. They could only trade it for the 
actual needs of life, such as sugar, salt, sole leather, etc. ]Mr. Col- 
well was one of the leading stockmen of Stark county for a great 
many years, buying, selling and shipping stock of all kinds. Before 
the railroads came to Stark county he would buy stock, which he 
would drive to Kewanee or to Chillicothe and ship from there to Chi- 
cago. Like many of the pioneers he was able to meet disappointments 
and do all in his power to overcome tliem. He met with many mis- 
fortunes, the greatest of which was no doubt the deatli of his first 
wife, who passed away in 184.7. at the age of thirty-three years, leav- 
ing him with six small children for wliom to care. She was in her 
maidenhood Elizabeth Dawson and resided in Hocking county, Ohio. 
Afterward ]Mr. CoIwlII married Clarinda Eby, who died in 1880 at 
the age of fifty-one years. To them were born thirteen cliildren. Of 
his large family of nineteen children all lived to manhood and woman- 
hood except one who died in infancy, but several ai-e noAv deceased. 
Those living are: ]Mrs. INIary Nicholson, a resident of Osborn, ]Mis- 
souri: ^Slrs. Jolm McGregor, of Grand Junction, Iowa: Mrs. E. A. 
Trimmer, of Perry, that state: :Marvin ^l.: ^Irs. ^l. B. Trickle. Lillie 
and Ollie, all of Toulon: David, of \Vest Jersey: P. B., of Wyoming; 
and Jennie, residing in Peoria. 

It is interesting to note the intermarriages of this with other early 
families of the south part of Stark county and of adjoining counties. 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 185 

Two of the sons, George and JNIiles, married Sarah and Amanda Barr, 
of Essex township. John married Ahiiira Fast, of Essex township. 
]Marvin married Mary Kendig, of Xaperville, Illinois. David tirst 
married Addie De Lent, of Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, and his second 
union was with ^Maggie Dryden, of West Jersey. P. B. wedded 
Cecilia Burns, of Princeville. and Douglas married ]\Iaggie Selby, 
of Princeville. Two of the daughters, Alcinda and ^Nlary, married 
Jacob and Thomas N'icholas, respectively, of Essex township. JNIartha 
married John ^McGregor, of Monica. Anna married E. A. Trimmer, 
of Essex township. Sarah Medded ]M. B. Trickle, also of Essex 
township. 



CHARLES S. McKEE. 

For years Charles S. ^IcKee was identified with mercantile inter- 
ests of Toidon and at all times his business methods measured up to 
the highest commercial standards, but in 1916 he sold his store. He 
was born in Ohio. ]May 2. 18G4, a son of Robert iNIcKee, who in 
186.) removed to Illinois, settling on a farm near Galva. It was upon 
the old homestead property in Henry county that Charles S. ]McKee 
was i-eared. early becoming familial- with all the duties and labors that 
fall to the lot of the agricidturist. He attended the Galva schools 
and in early manhood began clerking in a dry goods store, being 
tliere employed for several years, during which time he gained 
thorough and practical knowledge of mercantile methods, thus laying 
the foundation for his later success. 

In November, 1888. ]Mr. INIcKee was married in Toulon to INIiss 
INIary E. Hall, the only daughter of Dr. Hall, a native of this city 
and a son of Dr. Hall, Sr., wlio was one of the pioneer physicians 
not only of Stark county, but of central Illinois as well. ]Mrs. 
INIcKee's aunt was the first white child liorn in this section of the 
state. 

In 1889 ]Mr. IMcKee located in Toulon and for twelve years 
engaged in clerking here. He afterward established a new dry goods 
store on the south side of INIain street, where he carried on business 
for three years. He afterward bought out a competitor on the north 
side of the street and removed his stock to that store and carried on 
liusiness there until he sold out in 1916. He had a large double store, 
well lighted, and he carried an attractive line of merchandise 
attractively displayed. His stock included dry goods, clothing, boots 



186 HISTORY OF STxiRK COUNTY 

and shoes and groceries. He knew how to purchase advantageously 
and his prices were always reasonahle, Avhile his husiness methods 
were thoroughly reliahle. He won a most creditahle position among 
the leading merchants of the city and all who know him recognize that 
he deserves the success that has come to him. 

To Mr. and ]Mrs. jNIcKee have been horn six children: Emily 
Irene, the wife of Roland Forman, a farmer of ^McLean county, 
Illinois, by whom she has a son, Roland Forman, Jr.; Eleanor. Ruth, 
Lucile and Rachel, all at home; and a daughter, Lucy, who died at the 
age of eleven years. 

With Mr. ]McKee family interests are always first but he does 
not neglect the duties of citizenship, and while he has never been a 
politician in the sense of oflRce seeking, he has responded to the demand 
of his fellow townsmen that he assume some of the public duties and 
responsibilities. He has several times been a member of the town 
council, M'as also city clerk for several years and for twenty-three 
years he has served as chief of the fire department, which is a volunteer 
service, the department numbering twenty-eight active young men. 
While some disastrous fires have occurred here, they have been very 
successful in fighting the flames, few buildings having been entirely 
destroyed. ]Mr. JNIcKee certainly deserved much credit for his work 
in this connection and many other evidences of his public spirit could 
lie cited, showing that he has the best interests of the community at 
heart and is most unselfish in his devotion to the general good. He 
belongs to the ^Masonic fraternity and has passed through all of the 
chairs in Toulon Lodge, A. F. & A. ]M., of which he is now a past 
master. He and his wife are connected with the Eastern Star cha])- 
ter, and he belongs also to Wyoming Chapter, R. A. M., and to 
Kewanee Connnandery, Xo. 71, K. T. He and his wife are members 
of the Congregational church of Toulon and ]Mrs. ^McKee is connected 
witli the auxiliary societies of the church. They stand for all that is 
most worth Avhile in community life and cast their influence on the 
side of right, progress and improvement. 



C. W. EOCOCK. 



From his fellow citizens there have come to C. W. Eocock. of 
Toulon, many evidences of their confidence and trust in him. for on 
various occasions he has been elected to public office, while into his 
hands have been placed some public trusts. He was born in Fulton 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 187 

county, Illinois, jMay 2, 18.59, a son of Cyrus Eocock, of Bradford, 
who is one of the well known and highlj^ esteemed citizens of Stark 
county. It was in this county that C. W. Bocock was reared and at the 
usual age he became a jjuhlic school pupil. He afterward attended the 
AVyoniing high school and later he was employed ujjon his father's 
farm anil in his father's store, continuing with him until he had 
reached the age of twenty-two years. Parental care and training 
(jualitied him for life's practical duties and instilled into his mind many 
of those principles which have guided him in his later relations. 

^Ir. Bocock was man-ied in Wyoming, Alarch 5, 1882, to INIiss 
Anna L. JNIarkland, who was born in Ohio but was reared in Stark 
county, a daughter of John INIarkland, \\ho died during her child- 
hood. Following their marriage INIr. Bocock and his bride established 
their home upon a farm in ]Marshall county, boi-dering the Stark 
county line. In fact portions of this farm extended into the two 
counties, although the residence and other buildings were in JNIarshall 
county. There Mr. Bocock carried on general agricultural pursuits 
for eight years and during the period of his residence in Stark county 
he was elected and served for six years as road commissioner and as 
assessor for one year, Avhile for two years he was township collector 
in ^Marshall county. From JNIarshall county he returned to the old 
home farm in Penn township and there he devoted his attention to 
general agricultural piu'suits for sixteen years, bringing the land 
under a high state of cultivation and adding materially to its value 
and productiveness. While living ujjon the farm he was elected 
supervisor and served for one term, after which he was reelected. In 
1000 he received the nomination of the republican party for treasurer 
of Stark county and was elected to that office. In 1907 he removed to 
Toulon and entered upon the duties of his position in December of 
that year, continuing as the incumbent in the office for four years. 
His broad business experience and his public spirit well qualified him 
for the discharge of his duties and he made a most creditable record. 
Following his retirement from the position of county treasurer he 
sei-ved for four years as clerk of review. He is now secretary of the 
Elmira and Stark County IMutual Insurance Company and writes 
the policies aiid adjusts some of the fire losses and damages. 

To ]Mr. and JNIrs. Bocock have been born two children: Nettie, the 
wife of Clarence E. Scholes, now of Henry. INIarshall county, where 
he is bookkeeper in the National Bank; and Louva N., who is a 
student in the township high school of Toulon. 

JMr. Bocock has purchased residence ])roperty in Toulon which his 
family now occupies and there he is most comfortablv situated. He 



188 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

belongs to the Odd Fellows lodge of Toulon, in which he has filled 
all of the chairs and is a past grand, and he has rei^resented the local 
organization in the grand lodge of the state on several occasions. He 
is likewise connected with the Rebekah degree and he has membershijj 
Avith the JNIodern Woodmen and the Fraternal Insurance Association. 
A spirit of progressiveness actuates him in all that he does, whether 
in the control of his i)ri\'ate business interests or in the management 
of public affairs. He has ever recognized the fact that there is no 
such thing as standing still, that one nmst either advance or retrograde, 
and progression therefore became his watchword. He has done to 
the best of his ability whatever he has vmdertaken and on all occasions 
has manifested those sterling traits of heart and mind which in every 
land and every clime awaken confidence and goodwill. 



WALTER F. YOUNG. 



Well known and popular in Toulon is the circuit clerk and recorder 
of Stark coimty. Walter F. Young, who has practically spent his 
entire life in this county, arriving here when a lad of three years. He 
was born in Allamakee county, Iowa, near Waukon, August 23, 18.59. 
His father, B. F. Young, was a native of ]\Iaine and after he reached 
adult age was married there to ]Miss Sarah Gould, who was also born 
in the Pine Tree state. ]Mr. Young was a wheelwright by trade and 
carried on that business in IMaine for some years after his marriage. 
During that period two children, a son and daughter, were born to 
himself and Avife. In the year 1855 jVIr. Young removed with his 
family to the middle west, settling in Allamakee county. Iowa, iipon a 
farm near AN'aukon, where he continued to make his home for seven 
years. In 1862 he brought his family to Toulon and here established 
business as a contractor and builder. He possessed natural mechanical 
skill and ingenuity and invented and patented the first riding cul- 
tivator which is now in universal use. He spent his last years in Tou- 
lon, passing away in 18G8. His widow still survives him and is today 
a well preserved woman of eighty-six years. 

Walter F. Young was reared in Toulon and was educated in the 
public schools, after whicli he learned the carpenter's trade. He con- 
tinued to follow carpentering and contracthig for over thirty years 
and there are many buildings in Toulon and Stark county that are 
monuments of his architectural skill and handiwork. In 1912 he was 
nominated by the republican party for the office of circuit clerk and 



I 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 189 

recorder and at tlie following election a substantial majority was 
given him. He entered upon the duties of the position in December 
of that year and has since occupied the office in a most creditable 
manner entirely satisfactory to his constituents. 

In 1897, in Peoria, ^Ir. Voung was united in marriage to ^Nliss 
Effie Boardman, who was born in ^Missouri but was reared and edu- 
cated in Illinois and is a graduate of tlie Toulon high school. She 
afterward took up the profession of teaching, which she followed 
successfully for a number of years. ]Mr. and IMrs. Young began their 
domestic life in Toulon and to them have been born two children: 
JNIildred, who is a graduate of the township high school; and Gilman 
B., who is attending high school. 

jNIr. Young is identified with the ^Masonic lodge of Toulon, in 
which he has filled all of the chairs and is a past master, while for a 
number of years he has been the lodge secretary. He likewise belongs 
to Wyoming Chapter, R. A. M., and he and his wife are members of 
the Eastern Star. They also hold membership in the JNIethodist 
Episcopal churcli and take a most active and lielpful part in tlie church 
and Sunday school \\'ork, both being teachei's in the Sunday school, 
while JNIr. Young is a member of the official board and is the clmrch 
treasiu-er. They do all in their power to promote the growth of the 
chiu'ch and extend its influence and contribute in every possible way 
to tlie moral progress of the community. In all the relations of life, 
whetlier in l)usiness or in office, JNIr. Young's record measures up to 
Iiigh standards of manhood and citizenship and the consensus of public 
opinion names liim as a man of many excellent traits of character. 



WILLIAM H. HEWITT. D. D. S. 

There is no more progressive dentist in this section of Illinois than 
T>v. W. H. Hewitt, of ^Vyoming. who lias what is conceded to be 
tlie finest and best equipped dental parlor to be found in any town of 
its size in the state. He has a reception room, an office, a laboratory, 
a lavatory and a private rest room and is scrupulously careful to secure 
surgical cleanliness in his work and his apparatus is electrically driven. 
His offices are in the Scott, Walters & Rakestraw Bank building. A 
native son of Illinois, he was born in Biu'eau county in 1867. of tlie 
marriage of David and Drusilla (Spangler) Hewitt. The father was 
born in Ohio but in early manhood went to Bureau county, wliere lie 
engaged in farming. Both he and his wife are deceased. 



190 HISTORY OF STAllK COUNTY 

W. H. Hewitt spent his boyhood under the parental roof and 
accompanied his parents on their removal to Cass county, Iowa, in 
187'2. He completed a course in the public schools and subsequently 
^\as for two years a student in Oberlin College at Oberlin, Ohio, after 
which he entered the Chicago College of Dental Surgery, from which 
he was graduated three years later, in 1904, with the degree of D. D. 
S. He at once located in A\\voming, Avhere he has built up a large 
and representative practice. He has equipped his attractiveh' fur- 
nished rooms with everything that could promote his elficiency and 
add to the con^•enience of his patrons. He has gained unusual 
skill in his profession and has won a well deserved reputation for doing 
excellent work. His home, which he erected three years ago, is one 
of the iinest residences in the town. 

Dr. Hewitt was married in 1900 to ^Nliss Sarah Elizabeth AVhite, 
a native of Bureau county and a daughter of William and Elizabeth 
(licwis) ^Vhite, the former of whom is deceased, while the latter 
survives. The Doctor supports the republican party but has never 
had the time to sjjare from his profession to take an active part in 
politics. Both he and his wife are members of the Congregational 
church, and he is also well known in ^Masonic circles, belonging to the 
blue lodge and chapter at Wyoming, the conimandery at Kewanee 
and the Shrine at Peoria. Dr. Hewitt has not only won high stand- 
ing in his profession but has also gained the warm personal friendship 
of manv, and his genuine worth is recognized bv all who know him. 



G. C. PLATT. 



Among the energetic and prosperous farmers of Toulon town- 
ship is G. C. Piatt, who is devoting his attention to the cultivation 
of one hundred and sixty acres of land adjoining the corporation 
limits of Toulon. He has successfully farmed that tract for the last 
twenty j'ears and its productiveness has been greatly enhanced by 
his practical and prpgressive methods. 

INIr. Piatt is a native of Pennsylvania, his birth having occurred 
in Clarion county. December 18, 1804. He was there reared upon a 
farm and on the 18th of December, 1885, he was united in marriage, 
in Cattaraugus county, New York, to JNIiss Ella Bodish, also a 
native of Pennsylvania. For a time ]Mr. Piatt engaged in railroad- 
ing and in 1887 he made his way to the far west, settling at Grays 
Harbor, Washington, where he worked at anytliing that came to 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 






'*»>,• 




G. C. PLATT 






^ 




JIR8. G. C. TLATT 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 195 

luuui, being willing to follow any employment that would yield him 
an honest living. While residing hi that state he lost his wile hi 188'J, 
alter which he returned to the east and joined his mother, v,\\o had 
located at Toulon. There he \\orked by the month as a farm hand 
for a time, but he was not content to remain in such a position, being 
desirous to engage in business on his own account, that he might 
work his way steadily upward. Accordingly he afterward rented 
the place whereon he now resides, assuming the management of the 
property in 1895. He has since carefully and successfully carried on 
general agricultural jjursuits here, and in connection with the culti- 
vation of cereals best adapted to soil and climate, he has made a 
success in raising and feeding stock, both branches of his business 
being carefully managed. 

On the 10th of November, 1892, ]Mr. Piatt was again married, 
for on that day, in Toulon, JNliss Jennie Dodd became his wife. She 
was born in Tennessee but was brought to Stark county when a 
maiden of ten summers and was here reared. They traveled life's 
journey haiDjjily together for about twentj'-two years and were sepa- 
rated l)y the hand of death on the '22d of April, 1914. The children 
of the first marriage are: Herbert, who is married and resides in 
Galva. Illinois, where he follows the machinists' trade; and Purl, 
who was born in the state of Washington and assists his father in 
carrying on the home farm. Tlie children of the second marriage 
are: Pauline, who is a graduate of the Toulon high school and is 
now her father's housekeeper; Roy, Floyd and oMyra, all at home. 
Mr. Piatt is a member of the JVIethodist Episcopal church and also 
holds membership in the INIasonic lodge of Toulon, in which he now 
serves as master, while in 191.5 he was its representative in the grand 
lodge. Pie is also a member of Wyoming Chapter, R. A. M., and 
is ever loyal to the teachings of the craft and to those higher principles 
which are inculcated by Christian instruction. His has been a busy 
and useful life and whatever success he has achieved and enjoyed is 
attributable entirely to his earnest and indefatigable efforts. 



CHARLES H. GRISWOLD. 

Charles H. Griswold is the owner of excellent farm property in 
Stark and Bureau counties and is engaged in the raising of high 
grade cattle and fine hogs. His business interests are carefully, sys- 
tematically and successfully managed and are bringing substantial 



196 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

financial results. ^Ir. Griswold has always made his home in this 
part of the state, his hirth having occurred in 3Iilo township, Bureau 
county, on the 24th of Fehruary, 18.53, his parents being John A. and 
jMaria (Steinbrock) Griswold, the former a native of Herkimer 
county, New York, and the latter of Pennsylvania. Coming west 
in early life, they were married in Illinois and the fatlier carried on 
general farming in Bureau county until his death, which occurred in 
1877. his widow surviving him for about twelve or fifteen years. 

In his youthful days Charles H. Griswold was a pupil in the 
2)ublic schools of ]Milo township and later he attended college at 
x\bingdon, Illinois, for two years and also became a student in the 
Valparaiso University at ^"alparaiso, Indiana. Following his return 
he located upon the home farm and was thereafter identified with 
general agricultural pursuits until 190.). In 1882 he began the breed- 
ing and sale of road horses and has since continued in the business. In 
this connection he has traveled extensively, making trips each fall to 
jjurchase horses. He has bred, raised, trained and driven his own 
horses and he has handled some of the finest steeds seen in tliis pavt 
of the country. He also carries on general agricultural iJiu'suits and 
to some extent raises high grade cattle and fine hogs. His farm com- 
prises two hundred and twenty-two acres of rich land in Bureau 
county, all under a high state of cultivation and well improved, and 
he also owns three hundred and forty acres of land southeast of 
Chillicothe. ]Missouri. He makes his home, however, in Bradford, 
where he has erected a fine residence, a good barn and garage. .Upon 
his farm he has sixteen head of fine trotting stock and at one time had 
forty head. He has sold more trotting stock that any other man in the 
countryside and is one of the best judges of horses. He is today the 
owner of Lora Lay, regarded as the best horse in the county. His 
first i-ace horses of note were Billy and Nellie 3IcGregor and he has 
also been the owner of Phalaneer, Fred jNIcGregor, Buelah ^Vilks, 
Jennie C, King Amarigo and Prince ]McGregor, while at the jiresent 
time he has Lora Lay and ]Mamie Amarigo. 

In 1882 ]Mr. Griswold wedded ]Miss Emma Bennett, of 3Iilo, 
Bureau county, and they had a son, Harry, who is president and 
manager of the Keystone Iron Foundry at Los Angeles. California. 
The wife and mother passed away in 1802 and in 1894 l\lr. Griswold 
wedded jNIiss Jennie Conover. of ^Marshall county. Illinois. ^Irs. 
Griswold is a member of the jNIetliodist Episcopal church. 

INIr. Griswold gives his political allegiance to the republican party 
and has always been a strong advocate of the temperance cause, work- 
ing earnestly and untiringly in its support. In fact his influence is 



i 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 197 

always on the side of right, reform, progress and improvement and 
throughout Stark county and wlierever he is known he is s^joken of 
in terms of high regard. 



MR. AND MRS. ALEXANDER McKENZIE. 

A hfe is judged very largely by its inspirational quality, by its 
power to give to the lives that follow it just cause for loving admira- 
tion, and through that admiration, faith and hojje and courage. As 
a loving tribute, then, and also as a noble example of that unwavering- 
courage and that unquestioning' acceptance of life as it is, to be made 
better and more accei^table by those to whom the gift of it has come, 
this sketch of two simple, unaffected lives is here written, with a full 
realization of its inadecjuacy, but with the consciousness that it will 
be read by sympathetic minds and understanding hearts, fitted to 
interpret its ^^■ords aright. 

From the deepest poverty in the Highlands country of Scotland, 
there came across the Atlantic, in 1863, a father, Alexander ^IcKen- 
zie, and two sons, Alexander JNIcKenzie, Jr., whose life is here 
recorded, and Duncan JNIcKenzie. Alexander JNIcKenzie, Jr., was 
born JNIarch 20, 184.2, near Fairburn, in Ross-shire, Scotland, about 
eighteen miles from Inverness, the capital of the Highlands. The 
father and sons came straight west from New York city and located 
in Stark county, Illinois, in the Scotch settlement of Elmira, where 
they joined Jolm JNIcKenzie, the oldest son of the family. The 
mother. Janet Chisholm JNIcKenzie, had died in Scotland when Alex- 
ander was but three years old and Duncan, one. The father died 
in this country a short time after coming here. 

\Vithout money and without helj), it was some time before this 
little faniily was able to earn enough in a strange, new country to 
make a l)eginning toward buying a home. Rut little by little the tiny 
b.oai'd grew, until finally these three brothers together were able to 
buy, near Elmira, an eighty-acre tract of land with an old house upon' 
it. On the 14th of September, 1876, Alexander JNIcKenzie married 
Sarah Fowler, a daughter of one of the earliest pioneers, Rrady Fow- 
ler, M'bo likewise had made his beginning in the new country with 
absolutely no money. In fact, he borrowed the money for his 
mai-i-iage license when he married Rebecca Wiseman. This, how- 
ever, was ])robably the only debt he ever had without the means in sight 
to ])ay it ofF. Rut the inA-estment was evidently a wise one and the 



198 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

risk allowable in .such a case. A few years later these two with a 
family of three children set out from Pennsylvania by wagon to make 
a home in this fair Illinois of ours, which was then the great unopened 
west. 

In this new country, Sarah Fowler was born near Osceola Grove, 
in Stark county, ]May 5, 1844. Practically her whole life was spent 
in this county, where her father and mother broke the virgin prairie 
soil and built one of the old jjioneer log cabins. Her childhood knew 
both the pleasures and the hardships which belonged to those days, the 
days of the so-called '"good old times," and her young Avomanhood 
experienced the thrilling period of the Civil war. Brady Fowler was 
a stanch abolitionist and a harborer of fugitive slaves in those ante- 
bellum days. 

After their marriage, ]Mr. and ]Mrs. ^NIcKenzie went to a small 
farm of eighty acres near Toulon, which they bought for a home, and 
here nearly all the rest of their lives were sjjent, a place inestimably 
dear to them all their days. To this original eighty-acre tract they 
kept adding other land near it and making other investments. Here 
four children were born to them, two sons, Neil and Kenneth, and two 
daughters, Florence and Clare, all of whom are living in and near 
Toulon. In 1877 they built a comfortable and beautiful new home 
on the old farm. To make and build such a home of his own was a 
great object of ]Mr. jNIcKenzie's life, for he came frojii a country 
where such an achievement would have been impossible. Further 
than that he did not look or aspire at that time, but day by day. in 
spite of faihn-es and discouragements, and the slow consummation of 
his hopes, he worked steadily, perseveringly, without despair, \\itli- 
out envy, without bitterness, toward that end. never for an instant 
losing confidence in himself or failing in a persistent, enduring cour- 
age. Time jjassed and brought to him more than he had hoped in the 
way of possessions, until finally he came to l)e regarded as one 
of the leading financiers of the community. Such success in a financial 
way would be worthy of little comment were it not for the fact that he 
made his way alone and unaided while most peojile had at least some 
help to start with, meager though it might be. Neither would it be of 
much value for its own sake, aside from the fact that it is a monument 
to what man can do for himself in a patient, courageous way without 
the advantage of so-called "luck" and "good fortune," Avithout any 
tampering with speculation, or b}' any illegitimate business, but by 
simple, honest, persistent effort, merely raising the products of the 
soil and with the proceeds buying more ground to continue the same 
work. 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 199 

Nor were other things neglected for tlie sake of the mere accunmhi- 
tion of possessions. Of a quite and retiring disposition, JNIr. ^iclven- 
zie seldom took a part in public affairs but was always a ready giver 
to things for the public good and always took great pride in the town 
and community where he lived. In the Toulon Congregational 
cliurch, to which he transferred his membership from the Elmira 
Presbyterian in his later years, he was nmch interested and was 
ambitious for its growth and improvement. 

In the year of 1913, JNIr. and Mrs. JMcKenzie came to Toulon to 
the beautiful new home they had erected, because they felt they could 
no longer attend to their old work, and here, not quite a year later, 
INIr. jMcKenzie passed away on February 5, 1914, after a brief illness. 
jNIany people would regard this period of idling as a i)leasure and 
consider the past years the hard part of life, but ]Mr. JMcKenzie did 
not feel so. He regarded the years of his work time as the happiest 
years of his life and always felt that if a man could not take pleasure 
in liis woi-k. his life was not ordered aright, and for his own part he 
keenly regretted the necessity of leaving the old farm home. Yet 
Avith his characteristic facing of life as it was, he set himself to 
enjoy the simple pleasures of retirement and be grateful that he had 
lived such a long jjeriod of years, not set aside among the old but 
still a part of the world. 

For such a hard task as Avas his in his early years, he found in 
]Mrs. INIcKenzie a perfect helpmeet. Even among pioneer women she 
was a remarkable woman, remarkable in an infinite variety of ways. 
At the time of her marriage, she was able to do everything about a 
home, even to making candles and soap and yeast and cutting patterns 
for gowns. Yet amid all her household cares and the cares of a large 
family, she found time to keep up her intellectual interests. Her 
jjui-ely formal education, in her girlhood, consisted of the somewhat 
ha])]iazard instruction given in the old fashioned district school and a 
little smattering of Latin, grammar and history and rhetoricals at a 
small seminary near Abingdon, Illinois, where she begged her father 
to send her much against his will, for it was not yet the day of the 
education of women generally, and Brady Fowler was a firm, old 
fashioned believer in the home as woman's only sphere. She read and 
she learned all lier life afterward, balancing with a rare good sense the 
intellectual and the practical. The breadth and variety of her interests 
were marvelous, considering the meager opportunities of her child- 
hood and the time in which the formative years of her life were spent. 
They even extended into financial matters, in which she always took 
a keen ])leasure and delight, managing her own private property her- 



200 HISTOKV OF STARK COUNTY 

sc4f, for the jjure pleasure of doing it, with no small skill. She was 
one of the early members of the Congregational church of Toulon 
when it was small and weak and insignificant, entering it because she 
had faith in its broad principles and belie\'ed in its future, and she 
always remained interested in its services and all its allied societies. 
She Avas one of the earliest members, also, of the Woman's Christian 
Temperance Union, likewise a small and insignificant organization, 
befoie the days of the popularity of temperance and before any con- 
sidei'able body of j^eople had faith in it. Very early, too, she came to 
a belief in woman's suffrage, another unpopular cause in that day. 
Ill countless waj's she saw and lived and moved in advance of her 
time, a pioneer woman in more than one sense of the word. 

Yet with all this varietj' of interests, and interests, many of tliem, 
whicli were in lier time unusual and not customarj- among women, she 
w^as primarily a home woman, a perfect and devoted mother, keep- 
ing in the midst of all the stress of life and its conflicting demands, 
her sanity and balance and sweetness. In all the matters of the mod- 
ern world her interest continued to the end, and about her person and 
character in her declining years there was an almost complete absence 
of tlie withering touch of age. She, too, until death claimed her also, 
just four days later than her husband, on February 9, 1914, was a 
brave and splendid example of how one can mold circumstances till 
they contribute to the upbuilding of great life and character. 



A. C. COOPER. 

A. C. Cooper owns four acres of laud witliin the limits of Wyo- 
ming and is there engaged in growing fruit and raising bees. He is 
also active in the affairs of the municipal government, having been a 
member of the city council for the ])ast twelve years. A native of 
Stark county, he was born on the 11th of November, IST^, and is a 
son of George Cooper, who was also born in this county and is noAv 
living M-ith a daughter in Wyoming. He was a farmer during his 
active life and gained a gratifying measui'e of success in that occujui- 
tion. His wife, who bore the maiden name of ]Mary J. Patterson, was 
a native of Rock Island, Illinois, and is deceased. The paternal 
grandfather of our subject, David Cooper, was born in Pennsyl- 
vania and married Eleanor Essex, a sister of Isaac B. Essex, who was 
the first settler of Stark county and for whom Essex township was 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 201 

named. A sketch of the life of Mr. Essex appears elsewhere in this 
work. 

A. C Cooper has passed his entire life in this county and during 
his l)()yhood and youth assisted his father M'ith the work of the home 
farm and also attended the public schools, thus gaining a good educa- 
tion. Since 1881 he has resided in \\'yoming, where he owns four 
acres of land, and he is specializing in fruit growing and bee raising. 
He has made a scientific study of these subjects and is finding them 
both i)rofitable. He raises strawberries and ras2:)berries, for which 
he finds a ready sale on the market. He is one of the most extensive 
bee laisers in the county, having from ninety to one hundred colonies, 
and he takes great pains in their care, with the result that the honey 
from his hives has become well known for its fine flavor. 

]Mr. Cooper is a republican in politics and has taken a leading part 
in ])ublic affairs. For twelve consecutive years he has been a member 
of the city council and has exerted a great deal of influence in that 
body. He is a man of keen insight and strong personality, and his 
position on any question is never an equivocal one. He has a wide 
ac(|uaintance throughout the county and is universally respected. 



R. CHESTER JACKSOX. 

In 11)00 R. Chester Jackson purchased tlie farm on section 30, 
Klmira township, on which he now resides. His entire life has been 
gi\ en to general agricultural pursuits and the persistency of purpose 
wliich he has displayed has led to the attainment of his present success. 
He was born in Elmira township, April 9, 1881, a son of William and 
I>ouisa (Stone) Jackson. The father was a native of Scotland and 
came to the United States with his father, Thomas Jackson, when 
about seventeen years of age. The family home was established in 
this county and here William Jackson wedded Louisa Stone, who was 
liorn near Osceola. He was a pioneer settler of Elmira township and 
there, following his marriage, continued to engage in general agricul- 
tural ])ursuits until his life's labors were ended in death. 

R. Chester Jackson supplemented his early education, acquired 
in the district schools of Elmira township, by study in the Toidon 
Academy, and when not busy with bis textbooks his attention was 
gi\en to the work of the home farm until he reached the age of twenty- 
seven years, when he started out in business life independently by 
venting land in Toulon township. There he remained for three years, 



202 HISTORY OP^ STARK COUNTY 

after wliich he purchased his farm on section 30, Ehnira townsliip, 
becoming owner of the jjroperty in 1909. This is a one hundred and 
sixty acre triangular tract, on which he carries on the task of culti\'at- 
ing corn, wheat and other cereals. He annually harvests good crops, 
for his methods are practical and resultant. 

In 1908 Mr. Jackson was united in marriage to ^liss Elizabeth 
Grieve, a daughter of A\'illiam Grieve, mentioned elsewhere in this 
volume. They have become jiarents of two children, Helen Charlotte 
and Marcia Louise. JMr. and iNIrs. Jackson are members of the Pres- 
byterian church, in whicli he is serving as clerk, and their interest is 
always manifest on the side of those forces which work for tlie moral 
progress and improvement of the connnimity. In politics ]Mr. Jack- 
son is a republican, but while he has never sought nor held political 
office, he has served on the township school board of Toulon township 
and the cause of education tinds in liim a stalwart champion. For 
more than a third of a century he has been a resident of Stark county, 
covering the entire period of his life, and since starting out in the busi- 
ness W'orld for liimself he has made substantial progress, having stead- 
ily advanced toward the goal of prosperity. 



ROLLIX E. WHEELER. 

Toulon gained a substantial citizen when in 1906 Rollin E. 
Wheeler became a resident of Stark county. For the past six years he 
has been engaged in the hardware and automobile business and the 
progressive spirit which actuates him in all that he undertakes is 
bringing him to the goal of success. He was born in Ontario county, 
New York, June '2i, 1880, and had good school opportunities there 
while spending his youthful days in the home of his parents. His 
father, Sylvester H. Wheeler, was a native of the same county, born 
in 1829, and was a son of Sylvester Wheeler, Sr., wlio served in tlie 
War of 1812. Sylvester H. ^Vheeler, Jr., was a merchant and farmer 
of Ontario county, New York, for a long period but ultimately was 
appointed superintendent of a division of the overland mail service 
operating across Texas to the California gold fields, wliere he re- 
mained for several years or imtil the outbreak of tlie Civil war. when 
he returned to Empire state and there sjient his remaining days. His 
death occurred in 1901, and he is survived by his last wife, who resides 
in Bristol. Xew York. 

Rollin E. AVheeler was a resident of the Empire state until he 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 203 

reached the age of twenty-six years, when in 1900 he determined to 
try his fortune in the west and niade his way to Toulon, where he 
assumed the management of a hardware business owned by ^V. \y. 
^^"heeler. He was unacquainted with the trade but soon became 
famihar with the business and he also won popularity among the 
people. Under his guidance tlie enterprise proved profital)le, and 
feeling that he could win success in that line, R. E. Wheeler in 1008 
purchased the business and also bought the hardware store of Davis 
& Fell. He admitted C. D. Fowler to a partnership and they con- 
ducted their interests together for three years, at the end of which 
time ]Mr. \Vlieeler bought INIr. Fowler's interest and became sole pro- 
prietor but soon afterward took J. P. Williams into partnership, that 
relaticju being maintained until the death of Mr. Williams in Xovem- 
ber, 1914. ]Mr. Wheeler has since been "alone in the ownership and 
conduct of the store. He carries a large stock of shelf and heavy hard- 
Avare and in addition to retailing goods of that character he conducts a 
plumbing business, installs furnaces, handles gasoline engines, also 
installs electric light plants and is engaged in selling automobiles, 
largely handling the Chalmers car since 1909. This is a tine, well 
built, serviceable car, popular in Toulon. The various branches of 
his ])usiness are proving a source of success to Mr. Wheeler, who is 
a very energetic man, placing his dependence upon industry, close 
application and honorable dealing." 

On the 2d of October, 1912, jNIr. Wheeler was united in marriage 
to INIiss Ethel Williams, a daughter of J. P. Williams, of Toulon, 
now deceased. He erected an attractive modern residence on West 
]\Iain street and he also purchased and still owns a farm of one hun- 
dred and sixty acres in the Red River valley of North Dakota, all 
imder cultivation. His activities are reaching out along many lines, 
and it is characteristic of him that he carries forward to successful 
completion whatever he undertakes. 



MRS. HARRIET E. WINANS. 

]Mrs. Harriet E. Winans is the widow of W. H. Winans and a 
representative of one of the old families of Stark county. It was in 
the year 1872 that the Winans home was establislied in Goshen town- 
sliip. W. H. Winans was born in New Jersey, January 20, 18.53, and 
Avas a son of .1. H. Winans, also a native of the same state. After 
spending the days of his boyhood and youth in New Jersey, during 



204 HISTOKY OF STARK CUUNTV 

which i)eriod he obtained a piililic scliool education, W. H. Winans 
was married there on the lUth of 31ay, 1871, to 3Iiss Harriet E,. 
Clemens, who was born and educated in the city of Xewark, Xew 
Jersey. 

At length the Winans family determined to try their fortunes in 
the middle west and J. H. Winans and family, together with 31r. and 
3Irs. W. H. Winans, came to Illinois, establishing their home in 
Stark comity. They purchased an improved farm of two hundred 
and forty acres in Goshen tcsnisliip, near La Fayette, in 1872, and 
settling upon that property. J. H. Winans and son in partnershij) 
began its further development and improvement. Their labors were 
both practical and progressive and resulted in the production of sub- 
stantial crops. They also gave considerable attention to raising and 
selling pure-blooded stock, making a si)eeialty of Hereford cattle, 
and they became well-known breeders and dealers in pure-blooded 
Herefords. Their business affairs were ever carefully and wisely 
managed and a spirit of energy and determination actuated them at 
every point in their business career. 

Whatever W. H. Winans undertook he accom])lis]ied, allowing no 
obstacles to bar his path that could be overcome by persistent and 
honorable effort. He continued to carry on the farm for a number 
of years, after which he removed to Toulon, where he purchased a 
residence and then lived retired. His rest had been well earned and 
he merited the enjoyment that came to him in his later years. He 
passed away in Toulon in June. 1902. when in the prime of life, being 
tlien but forty-nine years of age. He was a loyal member of the 
Odd Fellows lodge at Toulon and also a helpful and consistent mem- 
ber of the Baptist church. In fact his life was an expression of 
Christian manhood characterized by a recognition of the rights of 
others and his obligations to his fellowmen. 

To ]Mr. and ]Mrs. AVinans were born six sons and three daughters. 
Henry C, who is married and has a family of five children, is now a 
resident farmer of Goshen township, living on the old homestead. 
Lida H. is the wife of Frank Price and has a family of three children. 
Robert S. makes liis hnme in Galva. Iowa. Emma C. is the wife of 
J. W. Rist. a farmer living near Burt. Iowa, and they liave two 
children. Clifford W.. who carries on general farming at Elkton. 
South Dakota, is married and has two children. John D.. a farmer of 
Essex township. Stark county, is married and has one child. Bessie D. 
is at home. Leslie H. is now a junior in Denison University at Gran- 
ville. Ohio, and Elbar J., a young man at home, completes the family. 

]\[rs. Winans is a ladv of excellent business ability, capably man- 



UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOiS 
URBANA 




HOME OF B. D. PHENIX 




BARN OF B. D. PHENIX 



HISTORY OF STAllK COUNTY 205 

aging her interests and investments. Sii'ee the death of her husband 
she has purchased a lot on South Henderson street in Toulon and 
thereon lias erected an attractive residence built in modern style of 
architecture and tastefully furnished. She is one of the active work- 
ers and earnest members of the Baptist church, and all who know her 
esteem her for her kindly spirit and her many good deeds. For forty- 
five years she has now lived in Stark county and is therefore familiar 
with many of the events which have figured most prominently in 
shaping the history of this ^Jart of the state. 



BARDWELL D. PHENIX. 

Bardwell D. Plienix, of Bradford, who has accumulated con- 
si(]eral)le wealth through hard work, thrift and wise investment, is 
connected with banking circles of the county as a member of the 
]*hcnix Banking Company of Bradford and is also a j^i'oniinent 
farmer and breeder of Guernsey cattle. His birth occiu'red in Penn 
township, Stark county, on the '27th of March, 1803, and he is a son 
of Daniel B. Phenix, a sketcli of whom appears elsewhere in this 
work. He passed the days of his boyhood and youth ujjon tlie liome 
farm and received his education in the district schools. As soon as 
old enough he began helping witli the farm work and assisted his 
father until he was twenty-five years of age, when, in partnership with 
liis cousin, Oscar Phenix, he came to Bradford and established a stoi-e 
liere. 

After being connected with its management for six years Bard- 
well D. Phenix sold out his interest tlierein and in 189;}, when the 
Phenix Banking Company of Bradford was formed, he entered the 
bank as assistant cashier. He also had charge of liis father's exten- 
sive interests and had the management of the large tracts of land 
owned liy the bank. He and his cousin, Daniel J. Phenix, have since 
diiected the policy of the institution and liave been very successful in 
ils management, securing a large and representative patronage. He 
lias large landholdings, owning four liundred and fifty acres in Stark 
county and liaving a lialf interest in tlie following tracts: two hundred 
and eiglity acres in this county, one hundred and sixty acres in Kan- 
sas, '^even hundred acres in Iowa, and three thousand acres in IMissis- 
sip])i, Illinois and INIinnesota, all of which is rented to good advan- 
tage. He is also well known as a breeder of Guernsey cattle and 
has inijiorted from the Island of Guernsey as the nucleus of his herd 



206 HISTOKV OF STARK COUNT V 

a pure blooded bull, Governor of the Bells, and four pure blooded 
cows. He now has about twenty head of as fine cattle as are to be 
found in this state. He was also among the first to raise Cornish 
Indian Game chickens and took a number of premiums on his fowls 
at fairs in Chicago and Peoria. 

]Mr. Phenix was married on the "2 1st of December. 1887, to ^liss 
Anna "N". Downing, a native of this count}'. Her parents were Nathan 
and Hannah Downing, the former a native of Indiana and the latter 
of Germanj'. They were numbered among the early settlers of Penn 
township, Stark county. INIrs. Phenix died from the effects of a surgi- 
cal operation at a Chicago hospital June 18, 1911, and was laid to rest 
in the Bradford cemetery. In 1913 "Sir. Phenix was again married, 
his second union being with JNIiss Gale J. Seipt, of Peoria, a daughter 
of Charles and Anna Seipt. 

]Mr. Phenix is a stalwart republican in politics, but has never 
desired office. His beautiful residence in Bradford is throughly 
modern and is the finest home in the town. His marked success in all 
that he has imdertaken is the direct result of his enterprise and good 
judgment and all who have come in contact with him acknowledge his 
ability. He is (juiet and unassuming but those who are admitted to 
his close friendship recognize his many fine qualities and hold him in 
the highest esteem. 



WILLIAM L. HULSIZER. 

;More than a half century has come and gone since William L. 
Ilulsizer became a resident of Stark county. He arrived here when 
a lad of twelve years and for a long period has been known as one 
of Toulon's valued and public-spirited citizens. He can give an 
accurate account of many events that have shaped the history of the 
county, having witnessed the greater part of its growth and u])- 
l)uilding. 

His birth occurred in Oxford, Warren county, New Jersey. De- 
cember 3, 1846, his father being Abner Hulsizer, also a native of New 
Jersey, in which state he was reared and learned the blacksmitirs trade. 
He and his brother, James Hulsizer, in early manhood drove with 
liorse and buggy across the country to Illinois, after ^\■hich the brother 
traded the horse and buggy for land in West Jersey. Abner Hul- 
sizer made the return trip to New Jersey by stage when he found 
opportunity to travel in that way but covered much of the distance 




MR. AND MRS. WILLIAM L. HILSIZKR 



U3RARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



IIISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY 209 

on foot. He worked at his trade at various places on the return trip 
and afterward conducted a blacksmith shop at Oxford for a number 
of years. He was married there to Miss Mary Ellen Correll, who was 
born in Pennsylvania but was reared in New Jersey. In 18.53 they 
left the east for Illinois, traveling by train and by lake, with Stark 
county as their destination. They settled in West Jersey township, 
where Mr. Hulsizer purchased land at three dollars and a quarter per 
acre near the village of West Jersey. He afterward built a shop in 
the town and there carried on liusiness, at the same time devoting 
every available opportunity to the work of opening up and improv- 
ing his farm, whereon he reared his family and made his home for a 
number of years. He afterward disposed of that property and came 
to Toulon, where he spent his last years in honorabe retirement fron'i 
business, his death occurring December 19, 1898. His wife survived 
him for a few years and throughout the period of their residence in 
this locality they were numbered among the valued, worthy and re- 
spected citizens. 

'\^^illiam Iv. Hulsizer, arriving in Stark county when a lad of six- 
years, was here reared on the old homestead farm and in his youthful 
days attended the district schools. He is, however, largely a self- 
educated as well as self-made man and from experience has learned 
many valuable life lessons. He remained upon the farm with his 
father until he attained his majority and then made arrangements for 
having a home of his own by his marriage on the "iSd of December, 
1868, to Miss Luzetta C. Swank, who was born and reared in Stark 
county and is a daughter of Henry Swank, who came from Pennsyl- 
vania and died during the early girlhood of liis daughter, INIrs. Hul- 
sizer. Her mother had passed away during the infancy of the 
daughter, so that she was thus early left an orphan. 

The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Hulsizer was celebrated in Toulon 
and they began their domestic life on a i'arm. He is the owner of one 
hundred and sixty acres in Goshen townshij) and there for a long 
period he was actively engaged in general agricultiu'al pursuits, his 
industry and cajiable management resulting in the annual harvesting 
of large crops. He likewise engaged in raising and feeding hogs and 
cattle and this constituted an important ])ranch of his business. He 
built a good residence on the farm, also erected substantial barns and 
outbuildings for the shelter of grain, stock and farm machinery and 
his place became one of the neat and well improved properties of his 
township. Year after year he carefully tilled the soil until 189G and 
then removed to Toulon, where he erected a very pleasant and attrac- 
tive home. Although residing in the city, he still looks after his farm 



210 IIISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY 

and is also engaged to some extent in the real estate business, handling 
Illinois farm lands and city property. 

In 1903 JMr. and ^Irs. Ilulsizer started on a trip abroad. They 
visited the JNIadeira Islands, Spain, Portugal. Algiers, Greece, Pales- 
tine, Egypt and other points along the ^Mediterranean, and returning 
to the European continent, visited Switzerland and England, having 
a most enjoyable trip in foreign lands. They also traveled westward 
through the Pacific coast states and have visited ^Mexico. Both Mr. 
and JNIrs. Hulsizer are members of the ^Methodist Episcopal church 
of Toulon, in which he is serving on the official board. He is very much 
interested in both church and Sunday school A\ork and for twenty 
years served as Sunday school superintendent, filling that position 
for eight years in Toulon. He is a most public-spirited and progres- 
sive citizen and is a leader in many of the public enterprises which are 
of value and worth to the city. He was largely instrumental in estab- 
lishing the Chautauqua and securing prominent and well known lec- 
turers, speakers and entertainers, making the Chautauqua one of the 
attractive features in the educational and social life of the city. He 
stands loyally at all times for those things which are matters of civic 
virtue and civic pride and labors just as earnestly to advance the gen- 
eral welfare as he has done to promote his individual success along 
tlie legitimate lines of business. His prosperity is well deserved and 
the most envious camiot grudge him his prosperity, so honorably has 
it been won and so worthily used. There are those who regard public 
aft'airs as matters of no concern to them, but ]Mr. Hulsizer has always 
recognized the duties and obligations as well as the privileges of life 
and fully meets every obligation as it comes. 



EDWIX HA in LEY. 



Edwin Hartley, who is living in Wyoming, still supervises the 
o]:)eration of his valuable farms in the county, from which he receives 
a gTatifving income. He was born in Essex township, this county, 
on the 13th of June, 18.57. a son of James Hartley, a sketch of whom 
apjjears elsewhere in this work. 

Edwin Hartley was reared ujDon the home farm and attended the 
district schools and the schools at Wyoming in the acquirement of an 
education. Following his father's demise he inlierited one hundred 
acres of land in Essex township and has since added to that tract until 
he now holds title to one hundred and eightv-tliree acres. In addition 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 211 

to this place he owns one hundred and thirty acres in Toulon township 
and three hundred and twenty acres in Potter county, South Dakota. 
He personally cultivated his land until lOOO, when he removed to 
"Wyoniiny-. where he has since lived. He still looks after his agri- 
cultural interests, giving close attention to the operation of his farms, 
although the actual work is done by others. He understands all phases 
of farming, possesses good business ability, which enables him to man- 
age his affairs well, and the success which he has gained is well 
deserved, 

3Ir. Hartley was married December 4, 1879, to INIiss ]\Iary E. 
Duckworth, mIio was born in Stark county and is a daughter of Henry 
Duckworth. To this iniion have been born two children: Arthur C, 
who married ]Miss Ella Russell and is operating one of his father's 
farms; and Bertha, who married Lewis Wagner, of \Vyoming. and 
has a daughter, Velda Loraine. 

]Mr. Hartley indorses the principles of the republican party and 
sup])orts its candidates at the polls. Fraternally he is a member of 
the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and his wife is identified with 
the Congi-egational church. He has been a lifelong resident of Stark 
county and is keenly interested in everything relating to the advance- 
ment of his community. Through the development of his farm he 
has gained financial independence, and he has also contributed to the 
wealth of the county, whose greatest resource is its rich land. 



J. W. HOUSE. 



J. W. House, living in Osceola, is the owner of valuable farm 
property in Elmira township, including three hundred and twenty 
acres lying on section 11. As the years have ])assed he has made 
judicious investments in farm ])roperty and from his holdings derives 
a gratifying annual income. A native of New York, Mr. House was 
born in the town of INIemphis, INIarch 9, 18.56, a son of James T. and 
jNIiranda (Weaver) House, who were also natives of the Empire state, 
where they remained mitil 18.56. when they removed Avestward to 
Illinois, settling in Osceola. Later they established their home three 
miles east of Osceola and upon that place continued to reside for many 
years. The mother died in 1894, while the father passed away aliout 
1902, their remains being interred in tlic Osceola cemetery. 

J. W. House is indebted to the district school system for the educa- 
tional privileges which he enjoyed. He remained at home until he 



212 HISTORY OP^ STARK COUNTY 

readied the age of twenty-three years and then removed to Bureau 
county, llhnois, spending- about seven years in farming near Xepon- 
set. At the end of that time he removed to Osceola township, Stark 
county, and afterward located in Elmira township, where he resided 
for seven years. He purchased a residence in Osceola and is now the 
owner of extensive farm lands, including three hundred and twenty 
acres on section 11, Klmira township, and two hundred and forty 
acres elsewhere in Stark county. He likewise owns a tract of land of 
forty acres, at Palm Grove, Florida. 

In 1880 ]Mr. House was united in marriage to INIiss Lizzie Lackie, 
a sister of R. Y. Lackie, mentioned elsewhere in this work. She was 
liorn on the old homestead in this county and has become the mother 
of three daughters: Edna, the wife of Herbert Ford, of Elmira 
township; Mabel, who married Don Tracy, of Elmira township; and 
Lena, at liome. 

]Mr. House and his family are members of the Baptist church and 
are people of the highest respectability, to whom is extended the hos- 
pitality of the best homes of the coimty. He also has membershiji with 
the 31odern Woodmen of America, ^hile lioth he and his wife are 
connected with the Royal Neighbors, the latter liaving been recorder 
for the Royal Neighbors since tlie lodge was started in 1800. save for 
one year. ]Mr. House has served as school director and the cause of 
education finds in him a stanch friend. In politics he has ever been 
an earnest republican since age conferred upon liim tlie right of fran- 
chise, and for nine years he served as assessor of Elmira township. 
He is well known in this part of the state, where he has sjient practi- 
cally his entire life, and as an enterprising business man, a progressive 
citizen and a faithful friend he enjoys the warm regard and goodwill 
of all with whom he has been associated. 



SAMUEL HALL. 



Samuel Hall, a prominent citizen of Bradford, is an extensive 
landowner and engages in stock raising on a large scale. He was 
born in Osceola township, two and a half miles northwest of Brad- 
ford, on the 4.th of August, 1860, of the marriage of James and 
Elizalieth (Howe) ITall, both natives of Derbyshire, England, 
where they were reared and married. The father A\orked in a cotton 
factory until ^Nlay, 18;54, when he came to the United States, where 
liis family joined him in 18.^6. Removal was made to Stark county, 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLiNOiS 

ORBBNA 







JAMES HALL 



/JW 1^ 




{I 




MRS. JAMES HALL 



LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOiS 

URBAWA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 217 

Illinois, and JNlr. Hall worked by the month until he had saved 
enough money to purchase a team, when he began farming rented, 
land. Later he bought eighty acres of land in Osceola township, 
paying therefor ten dollars per acre, and, although he had to go into 
debt to secure this property, it was not long before he was able to 
clear the farm of all incumbrances. The place has since remained in 
the possession of the family and is now owned by his daughter, ]Mary. 
He continued to prosper as the years passed and purchased more 
land from time to time until he held title to one thousand acres in 
Stark county. He gave his attention chiefly to cattle and hog rais- 
ing and gave his personal attention to his extensive interests until he 
reached an advanced age. He then deeded his land to his children 
and removed to Bradford in 1904, where he lived in honorable retire- 
ment until his death on the 18th of February, 191.5. when eighty-nine 
years old. He was supervisor of his township and was also called to 
other local offices, although he was too busy with his business aflFairs to 
take a very active part in politics. His wife also reached a good old 
age, i)assing away about 1908 in the faith of the Church of England, 
to Avhich she belonged. To their union were born six children, of 
whom tMO died in infancy, the others being: Samuel; Jennie, de- 
ceased; James, also deceased; and Mary, a resident of Bradford. 

Samuel Hall passed his boyhood and youth u])on the home farm 
and received his education througli attending the public schools. He 
continued to assist his father until the latter retired, and then received 
title to a portion of his father's estate, subsequently increasing his 
holdings until he now owns eleven himdred and sixty acres of land in 
this county. He rents part of his land but is engaged in breeding 
Hereford cattle and in feeding both cattle and hogs extensively, find- 
ing the stock business very profitable. In addition to his large land- 
lioldings here he and his son own three hundred and twenty acres in 
North Dakota. He has given thorough study to the various prolilems 
that enter into the business of stock raising, and his success is not due 
to good fortune but to the care which he has taken to provide his stock 
\\'\\h well balanced rations and the ])roper shelter and the close watch 
which he has kept upon the market. He is progressive, energetic and 
farsighted, and these qualities go far toward securing prosperity in 
any field of activity. 

Mr. Hall was married on the 7th of JNIarch, 1889, to IMiss Eliza- 
beth Hawksworth, who was born in Peoria, Illinois, and is a daughter 
of .Tose]ih and Elizabeth (Elm) Hawksworth. In 18.54 her parents 
removed to the United States from their native Yorkshire, England, 
and settled in Peoria, Illinois, where the father engaged in farming. 



218 HISTORY OF STARK COLXTY 

although he had previously heen coniiected with merchandising. He 
jjassed away a short time after his arrival in this state, but his widow 
survived for many years, spending her last days with our subject and 
his wife. She was a member of the Episcopal church anil was the 
mother of seven children, those besides Mrs. Hall being: Helen, the 
widow of John H. Mendenhall, of Peoria; ]Mrs. Eliza A. 31arden: 
Esther, who became the wife of Amos H. ]Mendenhall and is now 
deceased; Mary Jane, who married Finis Fawcett, a resident of Ne- 
braska: Charles, who is farming in Stark county; and John, a farmer 
of Peoria county. ]Mr. and ]Mrs. Hall are the parents of three chil- 
dren, Joseph Howe, Helen Hope and ]\Iartha Yirginia. 

]Mr. Hall has always given his political support to the republican 
party but has never been willing to accept office, preferring to devote 
his entire time to his important business enterprises. His wife and 
children are all members of the ^Methodist Episcopal church, and his 
influence is consistently given to the side of fair dealing and right- 
eousness. In 1907 he built a beautifrd home in Bradford, where he 
has since resided, but he still gives careful supervision to his stock 
raising interests. He has been a factor of no little importance in the 
development of liis county along the lines of agriculture and animal 
husbandry and is justly esteemed for his ability and progressiveness. 



W. DAVID FULK. 



For sixty-five years W. David Fulk has been a resident of Stark 
county, witnessing its growtli and development from pioneer times 
to the present and taking an active part in promoting its agricultural 
interests. He is still busily engaged in farming, his home being on 
section 16, Osceola townshij^. He represents one of the early families 
of the county, for his birth occurred in Elmira tnwnsliip. December 
29, 18.30. His parents were Levi and Rachel (3Iedaris) Fulk, wlio 
were natives of Ohio, in which state they were reared and married. 
They arrived in Illinois in the fall of 18.)0. having journeyed west- 
ward in a prairie schooner after the primitive manner of travel in 
those days. The father secured land and with characteristic energy 
began the development of a new farm, which he converted into ricli 
and pi-oductive fields. In 1809 he was called upon to mouiii the loss 
of his wife, while lie survived until June. 191.5. His political alle- 
giance was given to the democratic ])arty. 

W. David Fulk was reared to farm life on the old homestead, 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 219 

wliere lie remained until twenty-two years of age, when he located at 
his present place of residence on section 16, Osceola township. He 
has eighty acres of good land and is engaged in general farming. He 
has wrought a marked transformation in the appearance of the place, 
for he has erected good buildings, has brought his fields imder a high 
state of cultivation, has iilanted an orchard and has added other 
improvements. He has engaged in the raising of full blooded Here- 
fords, and his live stock interests have been an imi^ortant feature of 
his business. 

In 1873 ]Mr. Fulk was united in marriage to ^Nliss Eva E. Harris, 
and they have become the parents of three children: W. T., who is 
assisting his fatlier on the home farm; Bessie L., at home; and Jolm 
JM., who is I'csiding upon another farm of eighty acres owned by his 
father, near Bradford. 

In his jjolitical views ]Mr. Fulk has always follo^ved an inilepend- 
ent course, casting his ballot according to the dictates of judgment 
and the exigencies of the case. For a number of years he served as 
school director, and the cause of education found in liim a warm friend. 
He and his wife attend the ]\Iethodist Episcopal churcli and they are 
worthy people, esteemed for their many excellent traits of character 
and respected for their well spent lives. ]Mr. Fulk deserves mention 
among the honored pioneer settlers of the county and his memory 
foi'ms a connecting link between the primiti\'e ])ast and the progressive 
present. He has lived to see remarkable clianges as i^ioneer homes 
have been rej)laced by commodious and beautiful farm residences. 
The buildings for the shelter of grain and stock have also been greatly 
im])roved, for the county is dotted here and there with mammoth barns 
and sheds. There is no featiu'e of twentieth century farming that is 
not found in this district, and Mr. Fulk rejoices in what has been 
accomplished not only along agricultural lines but in all lines of nor- 
mal business development. 



EIMERY S. BUFFUM. 



Among the honored veterans of the Civil war living in Toulon is 
Emery S. BufFum, who was among those that in the darkest hour of 
our country's history rallied to the defense of the old flag and kept 
the stars and stripes waving over the national capitol as the symbol of 
a miited country. For many years he was acti\'ely and successfully 
engaged in farming in Stark county and is still the owner of one 



220 HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 

hundred and eighty acres of rich and jJi-oductive hind in Goshen town- 
ship but is now living retired from active business. His residence in 
the county covers a period of more than half a century, for he arrived 
here in 1864. 

JNlr. Buffum is a native of Rock Island, Illinois, and was born 
January 7, 1842. His grandfather, Jonathan Buffum, was born in 
Vermont and on coming to the Avest soon after the Black Hawk war, 
settled in Canton, Illinois. Later he removed to and settled in Rock 
Island, erecting the fii'st brick building in that city. This was a hotel 
and for a nmiiber of years he continued activelj^ in the hotel business. 
He afterward removed to Andalusia, where he spent his last years. 
During the period of the Black Plawk war he made his home in ]Mon- 
mouth. His son, Abel C. Buff"um, was born in Ohio and was among 
the first settlers of Rock Island, establishing his home there about 
1832, which was the year in which the Black Hawk war occurred, 
whereby the question of Indian supremacy in Illinois was forever 
ended. He was married in Knoxville, this state, to ]Miss Lucinda ]M. 
Pease, a native of Vermont. For a long period Abel C. Buffum 
carried on farming in Rock Island county but afterward removed to 
Knox county and eventually became a resident of Taylor county, 
Iowa, where he remained for a number of years. At length he went to 
California, taking up his abode in Anderson, Shasta county, where he 
lived retired until his death, which occurred when he had reached the 
advanced age of eighty-foin- years, four months and twelve days. He 
was married three times, being survived by his third wife. 

Fmery S. Buff'um, whose name introduces this review, was the 
only son of his father's tirst marriage. He was reared in Knox coimty, 
Illinois, and acquired his education in the common schools. On the 
19th of August, 1861, when a youth of nineteen years, he res]:)onded 
to the country's call for aid, enlisting in Company B. Thirty-seventh 
Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under command of Colonel John C. 
Black. He particijjated in the battle of Pea Ridge, Arkansas, where 
he was wounded in the breast, and because of the serious nature of his 
injuries he was afterward honorably discharged. 

Later INIr. Buffum returned to Stark county and A\ent upon a 
farm. On the 17th of JSIay, 1864. he was married in Toulon to ]Miss 
Anna L. Himes, who Avas born in Bradford county, Pennsylvania, a 
daughter of Charles and I>iaura Himes, who were among the pioneer 
settlers of this county. After cultivating rented land for two years 
Mr. Buffum purchased eighty-eight acres wliich was entirely a Avild 
tract. Witli cliaracteristic energy he began to develop and improve 
the ])roperty and afterward extended the boundaries of his farm as 



i 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 221 

liis iiiuincial resources increased until he became the owner of one 
hundred and eighty acres in Goshen township and also other land in 
the county. Upon his home place he erected a good residence and a 
sul)stantial barn and other outbuildings for the shelter of grain and 
stock. He continued farming there until 1901 and later he rented his 
farm to his son for several years and afterward leaseil it to others. 
He still owns the place, which is situated near the Henry county line, 
and from this he derives a gratifying annual income. Upon taking 
up his abode in the city he purchased the residence which he now 
occupies, and the success which he achieved in former years supplies 
him with all of the comforts and some of the luxuries of life. 

To ]Mr. and JNIrs. Euff'um have been born six sons and three daugh- 
ters who are yet living, namely : Charles A., who is engaged in business 
at Uong Beach. California: Edwin K., who is a partner with his 
brother at Long Beach; Klnier H., a real estate and insurance man of 
Toulon; George N., who follows farming at New Bechard, Saskatche- 
wan, Canada; Perry H., a farmer living at Hayfield, jNIinnesota; Roy 
U., who is engaged in the practice of medicine at Long Beach ; Latu'a 
L., the wife of Simeon Uunbar, a farmer and stock raiser of Casey, 
Iowa; Clara L., the wife of Fred P. James, of Hayfield, INIinnesota; 
and A. ]May, the wife of Fred Nicholson, a farmer of Stark county. 
They also lost two children: Alberta, who died at the age of twelve 
years: and Nellie E.. when ten years of age. 

Politically oNIr. Buffum is a republican and has frequently been a 
delegate to party conventions. He has served on the board of super- 
visors for two j'ears and is a stalwart advocate of the principles in 
which he believes. He has passed all of the chairs in Toulon Lodge, 
L O. O. F., of which he is a past grand, and he has twice been a dele- 
gate to the grand lodge. He and his wife are identified with the 
Rebekah degree, in which JNIrs. BufFum has filled all of the offices and 
has likewise been a delegate to the grand order. They are earnest 
Christian people. IMr. Buffum belonging to the ^Methodist chiu'ch and 
his wife to the Baptist church. They are both active church workers 
and do all in their power to promote Christian influence in the com- 
munity. jNIr. Buffum belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic 
and was at one time commander of the old post at Galva and later at 
Toulon. He thus maintains ])leasant relations with his conu'ades with 
whom he wore the blue and with whom he followed the nation's starry 
flag to victory on southern battlefields. He is a member of the Old 
Settlers Association, in which he has been honored with office. 

In 1876 Mr. and Mrs. BufFum attended the Centennial Exposition 
held in Philadelphia and they have also attended the World's Colum- 



222 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

hian Exposition in Chicago, the Louisiana Purchase Exposition in 
St. Louis and the exposition in PortUind, Oregon. During the past 
seven years they have spent the winter niontlis in Caht'ornia, much of 
the time being passed with their sons at Long Beach, although they 
liave visited the various cities and jjoints of interest on the Pacific 
coast. Both ]Mr. and ]Mrs. Buffuni are well-known residents of Toulon 
and Stark county and are highly esteemed for their many excellent 
traits of character. Their home is ever ojjen for the reception of their 
friends, who are many and who are ever cordial!}- ^\■ek•omed to their 
fireside. 



DAXIEL J. 0\YEXS. 



Daniel J. Owens, occupying one of the fine homes of Bradford, 
has long been a iirominent I'epresentative of its business interests, 
formerly identified with merchandising and now with agrieultuial 
pursuits. He was born in Penn township. Stark county, January 6, 
1871. a son of John and ^Nlaria (Dillon) Owens, both of whom were 
natives of Ireland, the father coming of AYelsh ancestry. In early 
life both arrived in the United States and were married on this side 
the Atlantic. John Owens had made the voyage to the new world 
when seventeen years of age, or in 18.56. and, penetrating into the 
interior of the country, had settled in Stark county, where he pur- 
chased a tract of raw land on which not a furrow had been tinned 
nor an improvement made. \Vith characteristic energy he liegan to 
develoj) tliat place and there continued to engage in farming until 
1 87'2, when he removed to Campgrove, Illinois, wliere he lived for fcmr 
years. On the expiration of that period he took up his abode on a farm 
east of Bradford, Avhere he still resides, being one of the well known 
and highly respected farmers of Stark county, \\here he has resided 
almost continuously for six decades. His wife passed away in 1899. 

,Vt the usual age Daniel J. Owens became a public school ])U])il 
and also attended St. ^Mary's College in Kansas, where he finished the 
course but did not quite graduate. He has since attended Loyola 
College of Chicago, where he won the LL. B. degree. After his 
education was completed he took up the business of merchandising in 
189.'5 and remained active therein for more than twenty years or imtil 
191 -I. when he sold out. He has since given his attention to farming 
and lias met with excellent success in that undertaking. In 1908 he 
erected a fine residence which is one of tlie best in Bradford. In con- 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 223 

nectioii with his three brothers he owns six huiuh'ed acres of land. He 
likewise has three hundred and sixteen acres in Warren countj% whicli 
is cultivated under his personal supervision and direction. One of the 
most distinguished students of economics, in all America has said that 
there is no better investment than Illinois farm land. Believing this, 
31 r. Owens has placed his money in acreage and is today reaping the 
rewards of his sound judgment and untiring labor, for his farm prop- 
erties are returning to him a most gratifying annual income. 

On the 5th of June, 1912, ]Mr. Owens was married to Miss INIaria 
Cahill. a native of Stark county, and they now have two children, 
]Mary Josephine and Daniel J., Ijoth at home. The parents are mem- 
bers of St. John's Catholic church, and Mr. Owens is identified with 
the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Oi'der of Foresters. He 
votes with tlie democratic party where national issues are involved but 
at local elections does not consider party ties. He has served as mayor 
of Bradford, and gave to the citj^ a businesslike and progressive 
administration that largely promoted public interests. 



GEORGE M. TURXBULL. 

The name Turnbull has ever lieen a synonym in Stark country 
for progressiveness in business and for loyalty in citizenship, and the 
family has been represented in this part of the state from the pioneer 
era. George M. Turnbull was born Jaiuiary 1.5, 18G7, at the second 
liouse south of his present home, which is situated on section Ifi, 
Elmira township. The family was establislied in Illinois by his grand- 
father, a native of Roxburyshire, Scotland, who on coming to the new 
world l)rought with him his family, including William Turnbull, the 
father of George M. William Turnbull was partially reared in Stark 
county. His birth had occurred in Roxl)uryshire, Scotland, but in liis 
youtliful days he came with his parents to the United States and com- 
pleted his education in the schools of this district. He afterward 
located just north of the farm of George IVI. Turnbull and there 
resided until his death, which occurred about sixteen years ago, his 
attentic)n throughout the entire period being given to agricultural 
pursuits. His widow survived him for about six years and then she 
too passed away. 

A common school education fitted George M. Turnbull for the 
active and practical duties of life, together with the training which he 
received u[)on the home farm. He continued on the old honiestead 



224 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

until he attained his niajoritj'. He first iJurcliased land near Galva, 
Illinois, on which he lived for seven years and then came to his present 
place, which is situated on section 16, Elmira township. He now owns 
two hundred acres of land in this tract, and upon it he has placed good 
improvements. He also owns one hundred and sixty acres of land at 
Watton, North Dakota. Upon his Stark county farm he is engaged 
quite extensively in feeding hogs and sheep, this being an important 
branch of his business. 

On the 30th of April, 1892, INIr. Turnbull was united in marriage 
to JNIiss INIary JNIcKenzie, a native of Scotland, and they became the 
parents of four children : Catherine B., now of Nebraska; William K., 
at home; Clarence, who is a school teacher in Elmira; anil ]Mary I., 
attending school in Toulon. The wife and mother passed away in 
1900. She was a devoted member of the Presbyterian church, to which 
JNIr. Turnbull belongs. For twelve or fifteen years he has served as 
school director and is greatly interested in the advancement of the 
cause of education. In politics he has been an earnest republican since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise. 



EDWIN HOLMES. 



Edwin Holmes is one of the most venerable citizens of Stark 
county, having passed the eighty-fourth milestone on life's journey. 
For a long period he was actively connected with farming on section 
12, Penn township, but now lives retired, making his home with his 
daughter, Mrs. W. C. Bocock. He was born in Hyde, Cheshire, 
England. April 9, 1832, a son of Eli and INIaria (Bailey) Holmes. 
The father, Avho was a clothier, died during the infancy of the son, 
who was one of eight children, of whom three sons came to the 
United States. 

In the common schools of his native country Edwin Holmes 
mastered the elementary branches of learning and when about fifteen 
years of age bound liimself out to Captain Jacob Gilles of the 
merchant ship Queen, a sailing vessel, on which he remained for 
three years. At New York he shipped as second mate on the Ij. & W. 
Armstrong, a vessel on which he sailed to jNIaricaibo, South America. 
While in charge of the deck one day a colored man refused to do his 
work and this brought on trouble, resulting in mutiny, but with the 
aid of some soldiers the disturbance was quelled, and of the four 
negroes who were prominent in the disturbance two Avere brought 




MR. AXI) >rRS. KDWIX lln|,MKS 



UmvtKSllY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 227 

back in irons to New York, where Mr. Holmes was suninioncd to 
appear as a witness against them. 

Alter four years spent as a seaman Mr. Hohnes returned to 
Liverpool with the intention of going to the East Indies, but on 
landing was met by his mother and sister, who were en route for 
America, and he accompanied them, arriving at New Orleans in the 
spring of 1850. He then proceeded northward and found employ- 
ment in a brickj'ard in Fulton county, Illinois, at fourteen dollars 
per month, working from two o'clock in the morning imtil after 
dark. He afterward spent several years in the coal mines near 
Canton, Illinois, and while thus engaged was married in 1855 to JNIiss 
Salina Savill, who was born at Oldham, England, Init when four 
years of age was brought to this country by her parents, Abraham 
and Anne (Adee) Savill, who, after a winter spent in Cincinnati, 
removed to Canton, Illinois. Mr. and JNIrs. Holmes began their 
domestic life at Canton l)ut a year later came to Stark county, and 
for another year he was employed in the coal mines of Toulon town- 
ship. He then retui-ned to Canton and two years later went to ]Mar- 
shall county, Illinois, \\here he engaged in farming for a year. He 
then removed to a rented farm in Penn township. Stark county, and 
after two years purchased forty acres on section 12 in that township, 
taking up his abode on that place in 1800. 

After two years, however, JNIr. Holmes put aside business and 
personal considerations in order to defend the Union, enlisting on 
the 12th of April, 1862, as a member of the One Hundred and 
Twelfth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Colonel Thomas J. 
Henderson. In September the troops were sworn in and a few 
days later started for Kentuckj% where they went into winter quar- 
ters. After active experience of a year in the usual military routine, 
JNIr. Holmes was detailed for a scouting expedition Avith three 
companions. At five o'clock in the afternoon of September 14, 1803, 
they crossed the Hiawassee river and at two o'clock in the morning 
arrived at Cleveland. In an engagement which followed three days 
later, where they fought against overwhelming odds, they were com- 
pelled to surrender. The captain of the company had been killed 
and Mr. Holmes was severely wounded in the leg. All of the com- 
pany were sent to Richmond, save JNIr. Holmes, ^\■ho, imable to walk, 
was left at Cleveland. Two weeks later he was sent with a mmd)er 
of other prisoners to Dalton, Georgia, and after eight days there was 
sent fifty miles farther south to Cassville. His traveling greatly 
inflamed his woimds, almost causing the loss of his leg. He had 
suffered too from the neglect of the rebel surgeon, but was fortunate 



228 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

in that the surgeons were changed about that time, and from the 
new one he received kindness and attention. On the 2.5th of Jan- 
uary, 1864, with other soldiers, he was removed to Athuita, then the 
lieart of the southern confederacy. He suiFered all the hardships 
and jirivations of southern prison life with poor food and no com- 
forts. In the last of February the good news was received that an 
exchange was to be made, and Mr. Holmes and his comrades were 
taken to Dalton, only to be disappointed, for after twenty-four men 
were exchanged the balance were sent back to Atlanta, where they 
were i)laced under strong guard. On the S-tth of jNIarch again came 
the order for exchange, but this, too, proved to be a delusion and 
thej' were sent to Andersonville, where it seemed that rebel cruelty 
had reached its height such was the luunitigated misery and suffer- 
ing which i^resented itself there within the prison walls. There was 
not a tent of any kind to shelter the twenty thousand there con- 
fined. The weather was cold and it rained constantly. The condi- 
tions were most unsanitary and they were deliberately and systemat- 
ically starved, while many of the men were almost naked, the rebels 
having taken their clothes. All around were men dead and dying, 
]Mr. Holmes was still lame and on crutches. ^Vrapping his blanket 
around him he sat down on his crutches, trying in that way to keep 
out of the mud, but he could not sleep owing to the cold and wet. 
Finally he heard someone say, "Has anyone come in from the Hun- 
(ked and Twelfth?" and to his great joy found a soldier from his 
own regiment, and later some from his own company, who invited 
him to their mess to partake of such food as they had, ^\hich was 
nothing but a little corn meal. On the evening of the 29th of ^larch, 
after having been enrolled, he drew his first ration at Andersonville, 
consisting of a pint of meal uiade from corncob and corn together, 
half a teaspoon of salt and two ounces of meat. That was a daj^'s 
ration. For six weary months he remained at Andersonville amid 
scenes of sickness, suffering and anguish, surrounded by dead and 
dying. Once more they were told that they were to be exchauged, 
again to be disajjpointcd, and on the 28th of September Avere sent to 
Charleston, the rebels fearing that the Union troops would be re- 
leased by Sherman, who had already taken Atlanta. At Charleston 
they were placed and kept under the fire of Union guns for two 
days, after which they were sent back about one hundred miles into 
the country to Florence, where they were ke])t under heavy guard 
until a stockade could be built, being most inlunnanly treated. For 
three days all that they received to eat was a half pint of poor corn 
meal and about, two tablespoonsful of stock peas, or negro beans, to 



IIISTOHV OF STARK COUNTY 229 

a man. Some days they had nothing at all to eat, on one occasion 
being ke^jt without food for three days as punishment because some 
of the Union soldiers had dug a tunnel under the jjrison walls, for 
which eleven thousand of the emaciated antl suffering soldiers were 
compelled to endure the pangs of hunger for three days. The hor- 
rors of prison life seemed to reach their height at Florence, but on 
the I'Hth of November, 18(}4, the order for exchange again came and 
the men were put on cars for Charleston, where they changed cars 
for Savannah, arriving on the 29th. The next day they took the 
Hag of truce and started for the Union lines, arriving on the same 
day on board a ship of the Union fleet. The relief and thankfulness 
of the men can better be imagined than described. Some of them 
had not been able to wash for months, and after washing they were 
furnished with new clothes and supplied with a good supper, the first 
real meal they had had in nine months. After a few days they sailed 
fo]- Annapolis and four days later landed on free soil. Mr. Holmes 
and his comrades were then paid off, after having been inmates of 
rebel prisons for fourteen months and twelve days. On the Kith of 
December he left for his Illinois home and when discharged from the 
service returned to the farm where his wife had remained din-ing 
his absence. 

lie at once resumed the cultivation of his land, and in 186G, hav- 
ing saved some money, purchased twenty acres more. Two years 
later he bought another forty-acre tract and in 1892 bought one hun- 
dred acres in Toulon township on which was a coal mine in operation. 
He also has one hundred and sixty acres of land in Texas, inherited 
from a brother. He developed his Penn township farm into a valu- 
able property, on which he placed many improvements and for twc 



years he engaged in general farming, meeting Avith substantial 
success. 

To JNIr. and JNIrs. Holmes were born four children: Maria Ann, 
the wife of William Coml)s Bocock, of Wyoming, by whom she has 
a daugliter, ]Mina; JNIary Jane, the deceased wife of Walter Swett; 
Albert Oscar, who died at the age of eight years ; and Alfred Edwin, 
in scliool. 

In 1852 ]Mr. Holmes cast his first presidential ballot for John 
Winfield Scott, and in 18(54. supported John C. Fremont, the first 
pi'esidential candidate of the republican i)arty. He has since been a 
stalwart supporter of the party, doing everything in his power to 
promote its growth and insure its success. He has never l)eeii an 
office seeker but has served as scliool director. He belongs to Dick- 
erson Post, G, A. R., and has attended many of the reunions of liis 



230 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

regiment and state encami^nients. He is a self-made man. owing his 
success entirely to his earnest efForts, close application and business 
ability. Throughout his entire life he has displayed many sterling 
traits of character and is today not only one of the most venerable 
but also one of the most honorable citizens of Stark county. 



ABRAM PHENIX. 



Abram Phenix, who is living in honorable retirement from active 
life in Bradford after many years of well directed activity, has been a 
resident of Stark county for seventy-nine years, and he and his brother 
Hai-mon are probably its oldest settlers. He was born in Luzerne 
county, Pennsylvania, on the 2.5th of December, 1829, and is a son of 
John T. and Lydia (Daniels) Phenix. The father was born in Xew 
York state, as were his parents, the family having been established in 
Xew York by his grandfather and great-uncle, who removed to Xew 
York city from Ireland as young men. The grandfather of our sul)- 
ject, Ste])hen Plienix, was born in that city and learned the weaver's 
trade from his father. 

John T. Phenix was reared in the Empire state and in early man- 
hood went to Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, where he followed the 
carpenter's trade until 1884, when he came west to Stark county, 
Illinois, and entered land in Penn township. He built a log house 
and as soon as possible brought his land under cultivation. He was 
joined by his wife and family in 1836 and continued to reside in this 
county until his death, wliich occxn-red when he was seventy-five years 
of age. He held title to and improved two different eighty acre tracts 
but after his sons became old enough to look after the farm work he 
left it mainly to them and gave his time to carpentering. Pie built the 
first sawmill and the first gristmill in his neighborhood and he not only 
erected the liuildings but also sawed the lumber and split the shingles 
used in their construction. He also built the first courthouse at 
Toulon. He was an active worker in the democratic party, whose 
princi])les he firmly indorsed. His religious faith was that of the 
^Methodist church and most of the early preachers of that denomina- 
tion in this county were entertained at his home. His wife was born 
in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, and was there reared and educated. 
She was engaged in teaching school at the time of her marriage and 
was successful in her profession. In 1836 she came Avith her children 
by water to Peoria and thence to Stark county, Illinois, joining her 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 231 

Jiusbaud, and through all ul' the years of luirdshiij and struggle which 
they, as well as other jjioneer families had to endure, she proved brave, 
resourceful and hopeful and did well her part in the development of 
the county. She was also a consistent member of the iNIethodist church 
and her life was at all times guided by the highest principles. She was 
the mother of six children, namely: Daniel R., a sketch of whom 
appears elsewhere in this woi-k ; Elizabeth, who married Samuel Sturm 
and died when eighty-seven years of age; Nancy, who became the wife 
of Solomon Gecr and died when seventy-five years old: INIary C, who 
married Hiram Drawyer and died at the age of eighty-four years; 
Abram: and Harmon, also represented elsewhere in this work. 

Abram Phenix was but seven years of age wlien he was brought 
by his mother to this county, and he remembers vividly the pioneer 
conditions that prevailed here during his boyhood days. He had prac- 
tically no educational opportunities as he was com])elled to Iielp with 
the farm work as soon as he was large enough to guide a plow, but he 
utilized his evenings in private study, reading by the light from the 
firci)lace or from a tallow candle. He remembers wlien much of the 
land in the county was wild prairie and he himself broke considerable 
land with an ox team. All of the implements wliich he used in farming 
in those days were crude compared with the complicated farm machin- 
ery of today. The resjjonsibility of the cultivation of the land 
de\olved mainly upon him as his father and older brother, Daniel, 
devoted their time to the carpenter's trade. After the crops were 
harvested it was difficult to market them as there were no l)ridges over 
the streams and as no railroads had yet been built through the county 
and it was necessary to make long hauls in order to dispose of the grain 
raised. There were a number of wolves still left in this locality and 
the region abounded in game, including deer and wild turkey, and a 
good hunter never lacked meat for his table. 

A year after his marriage ]Mr. Phenix began farming on his own 
account, purchasing forty acres of raw land for fifty dollars. Having 
no money, he paid for his land by splitting rails, and his first residence 
was a cabin fourteen by sixteen feet in dimensions. He brought his 
land under cultivation, and the following year bought an adjoining 
eighty acres, for which he ])aid eight hundred dollars, the difference in 
the purchase price indicating the rapid rise in land values. i\.s his 
capital consisted of only one hundred dollars he w^as compelled to 
borrow seven hundred dollars, for which he paid the exorliitant rate of 
fifteen per cent interest. After breaking liis land he sowed it to wheat 
and in due time harvested a good crop. Subsequently he jiaid seven 
hundred and seventy-five dollars for thirtj'-six acres adjoining and 



232 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

still later bought forty acres for sixteen Iniiulred dollars. As Iif pros- 
pered he erected a cominoilioiis and sul)stantial house, a large barn 
and other necessary buildings, and in time his place became one of the 
best improved in the locality. He engaged in farming and stock rais- 
ing until 1881, when he rented the farm and removed to Bradford, 
where he has since made his home. For nineteen years lie and his 
brother Daniel engaged in the threshing business and during that time 
owned twenty-one different machines. They were A\ell jjatronized not 
only in this county but in adjoining counties and derived a good income 
from that source. Abrani Plienix at one time owned the greater part 
of the land on which Rrailford now stands but has suice sold it to 
advantage as town lots. Since coming to Bradford he has erected 
three residences here. He is one of the substantial men of his county 
and none begrudges him his prosj^erity, for it is the direct result of his 
unremitting industry, economy and sound judgment, and he has not 
only gained financial independence but has also contributed to the 
development of the county along agricultm'al lines. 

^Nlr. Phenix was married in August, 18.51, to iMiss Esther C. Geer, 
a native of Connecticut. She Avas brought by lier parents to La Fay- 
ette. Stark county. Illinois, when but nine years of age and resided 
here from that time until lier demise, \\hich occurred on the 6th of 
April, 1909. She was a consistent member of the BajJtist cliiuTh. 
]Mr. and ^Irs. Phenix became the parents of five children: Mary J., 
who died when about thirty-five years of age: Phoebe Ann: Sarah 
^Melissa: Emma Eliza, who died at the age of twenty-four years: and 
Rosie ]Maude. 

ISIr. Plienix has always been a stanch democrat and has taken an 
active part in ])ublic affairs. He has been honored by election to a 
number of local offices, having served as street commissioner of Brad- 
ford for a year, as pathmaster in Penn township for one year and as 
road commissioner of Osceola township for fifteen years. He was the 
leading spirit in the organization of school district Xo. 9, furnished the 
lumber for the schoolhouse and put up the building and for a number 
of years served as director. He has always been willing to give of 
his time and thought and also of his means to the advancement of 
community interests and his public spirit is recognized by all who 
know him. When he came here as a child there was only one small 
house bet\veen Peoria and Wyoming, only three small stores in the 
former place and but two houses in the latter town. He is entitled to 
high honor as one of the courageous and farsighted pioneers whose 
work has made possible the present high state of development of the 
county, and his fellow citizens justly hold him in the highest esteem 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 233 

and the wannest regard. He has reaped the reward of his labors and 
has gained a large measure of wealth but he takes greater satisfaction 
in the knowledge that his success has not been gained as the result of 
the failure of another, as he has always been strictly honest and 
upright in all of his dealings. He is now eighty-six years of age and 
is still active and interested in the affairs of the day. 



HENRY DUCKWORTH. 

Henry Duckworth devoted his life to agricultural pursuits and 
through his well directed industry gained a competence which enabled 
him to spend his last years in honorable retirement in Wyoming. He 
was born in Haslingdon, Lancashire, England, on the 9th of July, 
1828. He passed his boyhood and youtli in his native country and 
received his education in the common schools. After putting aside his 
textbooks he learned the shoemaker's trade, which he followed in 
England until 1850, when he emigrated to the United States, sailing 
from Liverpool on the 6th of ]\Lirch in company with his sister, 
Elizabeth Duckworth. John Wrigley, Samuel Andrews, William 
Longdon, and Thomas Pearson and sister. They landed in New 
Orleans and came up the 3Iississippi and Illinois rivers to Peoria, 
arriving there on the 4th of May. Four years later Mr. Duckworth 
liad gained a sufficient start in business to enable him to send for his 
wife and two children, a son and daughter, who accordingly joined 
him in this country. The daughter, however, died in the same month 
that they reached the United States. The family home was main- 
tained in Peoria county until 18.58. when removal was made to Valley 
township. Stark county, where INIr. Duckworth i)urchased a farm. 
He devoted his energies to the operation of that place for thirteen 
years, and then took up his residence upon a farm near AVyoming. 
He remained there until he retired from active life and removed to 
Wyoming, where he built a comfortable home on Galena avenue. He 
died there on the 7th of April 100-1, deeply mourned by his many 
friends. 

Mr. Duckworth was married on the 27th of August, 1848, at Berry 
Cliurch, England, to jMiss JNIary Crabtree. who was born in Lanca- 
shire on the 19th of July, 1828. She passed away in Wyoming on the 
10th of Deceml)er, 1898. To their union were born twelve children, 
seven of whom are living, namely: Alfred, a resident of Toulon town- 
ship; iNIrs. Jacob Farden, of La Platte, ^lissouri; ]Mary E., the wife 



234 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

of Edwin Hartley: ]Mrs. John Eagelston, a resident of Chicago; and 
j\Irs. John Drinnin, ^Villiani and ^Nlrs. Charles \Vrigley, all of whom 
are living in \Vj'oming. 

]Mr. Duckworth supported the republican jiarty at the polls and 
at all times placed the i^arty welfare above his i:)rivate interests. This 
characteristic was manifest in the Civil war, when, in 18(54, he enlisted 
in the Seventh Illinois Volunteer Regiment, with which he remained 
until the close of hostilities. He was well known in ^Masonic circles, 
being one of the first members of the Royal Arch Chapter at Wyo- 
ming and belonging also to the commandery at Peoria. He aided in 
organizing the Congregational church and could be counted upon to 
fvn-ther its work in every way possible. In all the relations of life his 
conduct measured up to high standards, and he was justly held in great 
esteem. 



THOMAS D. CHURCH. 

Thomas D. Church, deceased, was one of the well known and 
highly respected citizens of Stark county, where he made his home 
for sixty-six years. He was born in St. Lawrence county, Xew York, 
in 1836. His father, Xorman Church, was also a native of that state 
and was there reared and married, continuing his residence there until 
death called him to the home beyond. His widow afterward married 
a ]Mr. Ivirby and in 1847 they removed westward to Illinois, settling 
in Goshen townshij). Stark county. 

Thomas D. Church was at that time a lad of about eleven years 
and upon the home farm in this county the remainder of his youth was 
passed with the usual experiences that come to the boy who is bred 
upon the western frontier. On the 31st of December, 18,)7, he was 
united in marriage to ISIiss Sarah White, who was born and reared 
in Goshen township, a daughter of John AVhite, whose residence here 
dated from 1834. He had removed to Illinois from INIassachusetts 
and upon his arrival preempted land which was at that time entirely 
undeveloped and unimproved. He broke the sod, harrowed his fields 
and put in his crops and in time was gathering good harvests. He 
also fenced his land, built a dwelling thereon and continued the active 
work of the farm, being one of the industrious, energetic citizens of 
the community. Success attended him in his undertakings and his 
further investment in property made him in time the owner of a large 
tract of land. He also bought and sold land and in this way realized 






a: 

c 






> 
•A 
C 



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LIBRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 237 

quite a substantial profit. He was a well known citizen of Stark 
county up to the time of his death, which occurred in 18.52, his wife 
surviving him for a number of years. 

At the time of their marriage JNIr. and JNIrs. Church located on 
the old Church homestead. He began farming an eightj'-acre tract 
of land, which he brought under a high state of cultivation, and later 
he purchased an adjoining eightj^ acres, becoming in the course of 
years a prosperous farmer. The tangible evidence of his enterprise 
and industry was seen in the improvements which he made upon the 
l^lace. He built a good residence, also substantial barns and sheds 
and transformed the farm into one of the excellent properties of the 
township. Thereon he resided until 1904, when he purchased a resi- 
dence in La Fayette, Avhere he made his home for ten years. 

As time went on, the marriage was blessed with eight children: 
Charles C, who is living in INIcIntire, Iowa; Wallace, an active and 
progressive farmer living on the old home place; Elmer, who is en- 
gaged in the practice of medicine in Toulon; JNIrs. Ed INIiner, living 
in Goshen township; William, who makes his home with his mother 
in La Faj^ette; ]\Irs. A. G. Fell, of Peoria; and two who have passed 
away. 

Mr. Church died in La Fayette, "Slay 12, 1914, at the age of 
seventy-seven years, and was laid to rest in La Fayette cemetery. 
He and his wife were members of the Universalist church of La Fay- 
ette, the church property standing on the same block as their residence. 
INIr. Church Mas also a member of the INIasonic fraternity and was 
always loyal to the high teachings and purposes of these two organi- 
zations. His was a mcII spent life characterized by loyaltv to duty, 
by reliability in business and by public-s])irited citizenshiiJ, and as the 
years went on he won many friends, so that his death was the occa- 
sion of deep and widesjDread regret. 



G. S. MALLETT. 



G. S. iNIallett. residing in Bradford, controls important and profit- 
able Inisiness intei-ests as a dealer in grain and coal at Loml)ardville 
and at Gravel Hill, wliere he is operating as the senior partner in the 
firm of JNIallett & Code. His birth occurred in Milo township. Bureau 
county, Illinois, December 3, IS.j.S, his parents being James F. and 
JMary Ij. (Steinhauer) JNIallett, both of whom were natives of Provi- 
dence, Rhode Island. On removing westward the father settled in 



Vol. n— 12 



238 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

Bureau county Illinois, in the early '40s, when the work of civilization 
and improvement had scarcely been begun in this section of the state, 
whicli is indicated by the fact that much of the land was still in posses- 
sion of tlie government. His father, E. J. ]Mallett, had pre-emjited 
a claim and James F. jNIallett began to develop and improve the prop- 
erty. E. J. ]Mallett was a paymaster general of the United States 
army and afterward took his son, James F., as his assistant and during 
a considerable period of his early life and again in later years he 
resided in Xew York city, where he died. 

G. S. Mallett was educated in the schools of ^Ulu township, early 
becoming familiar with the branches of learning there taught. His 
business training was received upon the home farm, where he remained 
until 1890. when he came to Bradford and entered the grain and coal 
business, establishing yards at Lombardville and also at Gravel Hill, 
conducting his interests under the firm name of jNIallet & Code. 
He has direct charge of the business and liis operations are directed 
by sound judgment and keen discernment wliicli bring excellent 
results. 

j\Ir. jNIallett has been married twice. He first wedded ]Miss Laura 
Enos and for his second wife he chose Carrie A. Ebersole. He is a 
democrat and for some years he filled the office of collector in ^Milo 
township but has bad little ambition to fill political positions. His 
religious faith is tliat of the Episcopal church, while his Avife belongs 
to tlie ^Methodist church. Fraternally he is connected with the 
jNIasonic lodge of Bradford, the ]Modern Woodmen camp and tlie 
Fraternal Reserves, wliile both he and his wife are identified with the 
Eastern Star chaj)ter at Bradford. Their lives are guided by liigli and 
honorable principles, Avhich sliape all of their relations with their fel- 
lowmen. INIr. JNIallett has many admirable traits of character, being 
persistent, energetic and farsighted in business, progressive in citizen- 
ship, loyal to liis friends and devoted to his family. 



FRED BROWX, D. D. S. 

Dentistry may be said to be unique among the professions in that 
it demands ability of a threefold cliaracter. One must have mechan- 
ical skill and ingenuity as well as scientific knowledge, combined with 
the power to manage the financial interests of the business. Lacking 
in none of tliese particulars. Dr. Fred Brown has become well estab- 
lished in his profession during the eight years in which he has engaged 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 239 

in practice in Tonlon. He was born in Mendota, Illinois, January 7, 
1884, and was reared in his native county, pursuing his education in 
the jniblic schools until he left the high school and became a college 
student. His professional training was received in the Northwestern 
University Dental School, from wliich he was graduated in 1908 as a 
member of a class of one hundred and forty-two, of which there were 
one hundred and thirty-eight male and four female members. After 
completing his studies in the vmiversity. Dr. Brown located in Toulon, 
where he opened an office and entered u])on the active Avork of the 
profession. His office is well e(]uipped with the latest improved dental 
a]jpliances and he has secured a satisfactory practice. 

On the 24th of December, 1908, Dr. Brown was married at Rock 
Falls, Illinois, to JNIiss Arley Elaine Reck, a daughter of J. P. W. 
Reck, of tliat place. Dr. and ]VIrs. Brown have a son, Frederick 
Keith. The parents are members of the Congregational church. 
Dr. Brown belongs to the Toulon INIasonic lodge, and is also a member 
of Wyoming Chapter, R. A. INI., and Kewanee Commandery, K. T. 
He is now serving as city treasurer. He and his wife occupy a pleas- 
ant home on the boulevard. During the years of their residence in 
Toulon they have gained many friends and enjoy the esteem of all 
who know them. 



EDWIN TURNBULL. 

A student of history cannot carry his investigations far into the 
annals of Stark county without learning of the close connection of the 
Turnbull family with the records of this part of the state, for from 
pioneer times to the present representatives of the name have been 
closely associated with the agricidtural develojmient and progress 
wliich have l)rought Stark and adjoining counties to their 2)resent con- 
dition of development and prosperity. Edwin Turnbull, now success- 
fully engaged in general farming on section G, Elmira township, was 
l)orn upon this place, January 30, 1873, his parents being William and 
Catherine (INIcClennan) Turnbull, both of Avhom were natives of 
Scotland. The father, when but ten years of age, came to the ITnited 
States with his faflier. He had begun his education in the schools of 
Scotland and some time after coming to the new world he began farm- 
ing in Elmira township. Stark county, Illinois, establishing bis home 
on section 10. where he continued to reside until called to his final rest 
in March, 1900. His entire life was devoted to general agricultural 



240 HISTORY OF STAHK COLXTV 

l)iirsuits. and he was I'eyarded as one of the wortliy and highly 
respected fai'iners of his loeahty. His widow survived him until 190(3 
and was laid by his side in the J]ilmira cemetery. 

EdAvin TurnbiiU was educated in the schools of Elmira and in the 
academy at Toulon, while his practical training along business lines 
was received under the direction of liis father upon the home farm. 
He learned every phase of farm woi-k and was thus able to assume the 
management of the home place, which lie is carefully and systematic- 
ally cultivating. In this undertaking he is associated with his brother 
David, and together with their sister ]Mary they are owners of four 
hundred acres, constituting one of the valuable and attractive farms 
of Palmira township. They carry on general farming and also engage 
quite extensively in feeding stock. They have put many of the 
improvements upon the farm and utilize the best machinery to facili- 
tate the work of the fields and care for the harvests. The brother 
David was also born upon this place, and both brothers are regarded 
as representative agriculturists and enterprising young business men 
of the comity. 

Edwin Turnbull is a member of the United Presbyterian church, 
and his life is guided by its teachings. His political support is unfal- 
teringly given to the republican party and for one term his brother 
David served as county supervisor, making an excellent record in the 
office. Having always lived in this district they are widely known, 
and the substantial traits of character which they have displayed have 
won for them enviable positions in the regard of their fellow citizens. 



A. R. GRIEVE. 



A. R. Grieve belongs to one of the old families of Stark coimty and 
was born on the farm on which he now resides, his natal day being 
July 2.5, 1890. His parents were William and Esther (Oliver) 
Grieve, who are mentioned elsewhere in this work, being now resi- 
dents of Elmira township. 

S])ending his youthful days under the parental roof, A. R. Grieve 
attended the common schools of Elmira township, where he acquainted 
himself with those branches of learning that are regarded as indis- 
pensable factors in preparation for life's practical duties and responsi- 
l)ilities. He worked in the fields during the vacation periods and has 
always remained upon the home farm, being now engaged in the 
fuvtlier cultivation of three hundred and fiftv acres of land, from 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 241 

which he annually gathers good harvests of corn, wheat and other 
cereals. He also feeds some stock. 

On the 12th of January, 1916, Mr. Grieve was married to Miss 
Pauline Hall, a daughter of M. C. Hall of Toulon township. They 
are both peojjle of genuine personal worth, holding membership in the 
Presbyterian church of Elmira and enjoying the confidence, goodwill 
and high regard of all who know them. JNIr. Grieve is identifietl with 
no lodges and politically follows an independent course, voting for 
men and measures rather than for partj'. 



ALBERT L. BARTOX. 

Albert L. Barton, who for many j'ears has been living retired from 
business in Toulon, was born in Toulon township, on the old home 
farm of his father, Barnard Barton, who was a native of the state of 
New York. Througli the period of his boyliood and youth the father 
remained in tlie Empire state and in early manhood came to the west, 
settling in Stark county, Illinois, where he rented land and carried on 
farm work. He became the owner of a tract of one hundred and sixty 
acres on section 9, Toulon township, by entering this as a claim from 
the government. AVitli characteristic energy he began the arduous 
task of transforming the wild prairie into productive fields. He broke 
the sod, opened up a farm and placed it in a high state of cultivation, 
carrying on the work of improvement as he found opportunity and 
gained tlie ca])ital necessary to further his labors. In time he erected 
a good farm residence, also built a large barn and outbuildings, planted 
an orchard and secured other modern equipments. In Knox comity, 
Illinois, he wedded JNIiss Sarah JNIiller, who was born and reared in 
Indiana, a daughter of William ]Miller, an early settler of Warren 
county. Illinois, and afterward of Knox county. ]Mr. Barton was an 
industrious and prosperous farmer and a well-known citizen of Stark 
county. Here he reared his family and spent the last years of his life 
on tlie old homestead, dying February 27, 1907. His wife had pre- 
viously passed away, her death occurring August 16, 1902. He was 
a member of the Toulon Baptist church. 

Albert L. Barton was one of a family of five sons and two daugh- 
ters. The eldest son, William A., is a retired farmer, now living in 
Garnett, Kansas. The second son, John INI., is living in Kansas City, 
INIissouri, and Silas H. is a resident of Wyoming. Illinois. The next 
two, Albert L. and George W., are residents of Toulon and the sister, 



2i2 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

Cordelia, i.s also living in Toulon. She has erected an attractive resi- 
dence of cement blocks near the ^Methodist Episcopal church of 
Toulon, it being one of the pleasant homes of the city. The other 
daughter of the family, Emma, died at the age of five years and five 
months. 

Albert L. Barton was reared on the old homestead and in time took 
charge of the place. After the death of his father he purchased the 
interest of the other heirs in the property and is still its owner. It is 
known as the Walnut Grove Farm and comprises two hundred and 
forty acres, which is divided into two well improved farms. He was 
always accounted an active and progressive agriculturist and stock 
raiser during the years in which he concentrated his efforts upon the 
further development and cultivation of his land. He afterward rented 
the farm, at which time he and his sister removed to Toulon, where 
she. as ])reviously stated, built a good home in 1908. 

INIr. Barton and his sister have made two trips to California, visit- 
ing various cities on the Pacific coast from Seattle and Portland south 
to Los Angeles and Long Beach. In the sunny clime of California 
they have spent two winters. INIr. Barton owns an automobile and 
drives back and fortli between his farm and his home in Toulon, and 
he has also made trips to Kewanee and Peoria and other cities in this 
part of the state. Politically he is a republican where national issues 
are involved but at local elections considers only the capability of the 
candidate. His has been an active and well spent life, and he is justly 
accounted one of the substantial citizens of Stark countv. 



ALVA :M. JANES. 



Among Stark county's most active and progressive citizens is Alva 
M. Janes, who occupies a position of leadership in the western part of 
the county, making his home in La Fayette. Fifty-three years have 
come and gone since he first opened his eyes to the light of day in a 
little log cabin in Goshen township, on the 10th of January, 1863, and 
through the intervening period he has not only been an interested wit- 
ness of, but also an active i)articipant in, many events which have 
shaped the history and promoted the progress of this part of the 
state. His father, Charles Janes, was born in Wiltshire, England, 
where lie worked in a woolen mill until he was seventeen, when he 
came to the L^nited States, joining a brother and sister in INIassachu- 
setts in 18.54. After a brief jieriod in that state he came west to 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 243 

Rocliester, Illinois, where he engaged in farm work. Mr. Janes was 
married in this county to JNIiss Christine Bergland, who was born in 
Sweden hut came to the Bishop Hill Colony when a child of nine years 
with her mother and brother. In the course of years he became one 
of the well-known and most prosperous farmers of his part of the 
county, having added to his holdings until lie was the owner of four 
hundred acres of rich and productive land. He spent his active life 
upon the farm in Stark county, there i)assing away in 190.5, while his 
wife survived him for a decade, dying in February, 1915. 

Alva ]M. Janes was reared upon the old home farm in Goshen 
township and actjuired his primary education in the La Fayette 
schools. Later he spent three years in Illinois Wesleyan University 
at Bloomington. After teaching one year in Stark county he con- 
tinued his studies in Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois, 
where he spent three years, being graduated with the class of 1893, at 
which time the degree of Ph. B. was conferred upon him. He then 
returned to La Fayette. 

On the 22d of June, 1893, INIr. Janes was married to Amy I. E. 
Reed, a daughter of Ira C. and JMaria Reed, prominent pioneers of 
Goshen township and founders of the I. C. Reed public library of 
La Fayette. Mrs. Janes was born in La Fayette. She is a graduate 
of Knox College and sjjent five years as a high school teacher. 

Following their marriage ]Mr. and JMrs. Janes established their 
home in Knox county on JMaple Grove Farm, which lies in both coun- 
ties and is adjacent to La Fayette. He is engaged extensively in 
general farming and in breeding and raising registered pure-blooded 
shorthorn cattle and Clydesdale horses. His business interests have 
been wisely conducted and have brought liim a substantial measure of 
success. 

He stands as one of the foremost agriculturists and stock raisers 
of the locality and is also a well-known figure in banking circles, being 
the ])rime mover in the establishment of the La Fayette State Bank. 
He organized the ])rivate bank of Janes k Com])any in 1903 and 
erected a good bank building. This comjnuiy in 191.5 was reorganized 
and became the I^a Fayette State Bank. 

His interests and activities have made him a most important factor 
in the improvement, upbuilding and progress of the section in which 
he lives. While he has conducted extensive and important business 
interests and has won success in that connection, he has at the same 
time found opportunity to cooperate in movements which have been of 
great general benefit. He was one of the organizers and promoters 
of the I^a Favette Fair Association, furnishing the grounds on which 



244 HISTORY OF STARK COUNT V 

the association erected good buildings to accommodate the large 
crowds attending the fair and the exhibits sent thereto. The associa- 
tion has the use of fifty acres, on which is a splendid grove of large 
sugar maples and other fine forest trees. ]Mr. Janes also helped to 
organize a stock company that erected a hotel at a cost of eight 
thousand dollars. This is a good brick building, furnishing hotel 
accommodation for the traveling public. There are few features of the 
town's i^rogress that are not more or less indebted to him for his 
cooperation and aid. Perhaps his most beneficial work to the town 
was the establishment of the second mail route, which was accomplished 
after much planning and labor. It necessitated the changing of five 
difi'erent routes without lessening their mileage and was such a her- 
culean task that the most optimistic predicted failure. He succeeded 
and \\()n great praise from the government official for his skilful 
work. 

]Mr. and ]Mrs. Janes have two sons, while two daughters died in 
infancy. Leonard Reed is a student in Xorthwestern University as 
a member of the junior class. Wilham Charles is a freshman at Knox 
College at Galesburg. The jiarents are members of the ^Methodist 
Episcopal church of La Fayette and ]Mr. Janes is serving on the offi- 
cial board. He was largely instrumental in having the pastor's salary 
raised, for he believed that the men who devote their life to the gospel 
should have adequate recompense that they may support their fami- 
lies. ]\Irs. Janes is also an active church worker, and their influence 
in the community is always on the side of right, progress, justice and 
improvement. !Mr. Janes is a member of the ^Masonic fraternity. 
Those who know him, and he has an extensive acquaintance in this 
pai't of the state, entertain for him the warmest regard because of his 
well spent life and the fidelity which he manifests to all those princi- 
ples which are of greatest worth to the indi\idual and to the com- 
munity. 



SAMUEL B. GINGRICH. 

Samuel B. Gingrich is now living retired in Toulon but for years 
was one of the active and progressive farmers and stock raisers of 
Stark county, making his home in Essex township, where he sys- 
tematically and successfully carried on general agricultural pursuits. 
Stark county numbers him among her native sons, his birth having 
occurred in Essex township, April 17, 18.52. His father. Christian 




jrR. AND ilRS. SA.AUKL H. (ilXGRICH 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 247 

Gingrich, was born in York county, Pennsylvania, November 8, 1812, 
and was a son of Cliristian Gingrich, Sr., who removed witli his family 
to Ohio, casting in his lot among the pioneer settlers of Ashland 
county, where he resided for a number of years. He afterward came 
to Illinois and joined his children, who had preceded him to this state, 
becoming a resident of Stark county. His son, Christian Gingrich, 
Jr., was reared in Ashland county, Ohio, and was married there in 
1837 to jNIiss Mary Coleman, a native of Lancaster county, Pennsyl- 
vania. The same year they removed westward to Illinois, making 
permanent location in Essex township, Stark county, where the father 
purchased a tract of raw land. Not a furrow had been turned nor 
an imjirovement made upon the place, but with characteristic energy 
he broke the sod, fenced the land and converted it into a productive 
farm. His first purchase comprised eighty acres, to which he added 
f i-om time to time until he was the owner of five hundred acres of very 
valuable farm jjrojjerty. He erected thereon a good residence, barn 
and outbuildings and he became one of the jn-osperous farmers, stock 
raisers and feeders of his district, his business ability and indefatigable 
industry bringing to him a creditable measure of success. Upon that 
farm he reared his family and spent his last years, his death occurring 
July 30, 1876. His wife siu'vived him for two decades and spent her 
declining years in the home of her son, S. B. Gingrich, there passing 
away May 11, 1897. 

Samuel B. Gingrich was reared on the old homestead and enjoyed 
the usual public school advantages. He was earl}^ trained to the work 
of the farm and continued to assist his father until the latter's death, 
after Avhich he succeeded to the ownership of the old home property. 
He was active in the further development and improvement of the 
jjlace, his farm work being conducted along progressive lines. He 
rebuilt and remodeled the house, which is now one of the best farm 
residences in Essex township, and he also built good barns and out- 
buildings. The farm consists of five hundred acres of Stark county's 
rich land and from the property ]Mr. Gingrich derives a most grati- 
fying annual income. While living upon the j^lace he made a busi- 
ness of raising good stock, handling Durham cattle and Poland China 
hogs, and he also fed stock for the market. 

On the 24.th of December, 1874, in AVest Jersey township, ]Mr. 
Gingrich married JNIiss Clara Whitten, who was born in Ohio but was 
reared in Stark county, a daughter of Theodore Whitten, who became 
a prominent farmer of West Jersey township. To this marriage have 
been born three children: Elva C, who is married and owns and 
operates a farm in Essex township, where he is engaged in raising 



248 HISTORY OF STARK COUNT i' 

and feeding stock as well as tilling the soil; ]Mabel, who became the 
wife of Charles Addis, a farmer in Knox county, Illinois, and died 
October 26, 1908; and Fern, a young lady at home. 

In 1912 jNIr. Gingrich purchased a pleasant residence in Toulon 
and removed to the city but still gives supervision to the work of the 
farm and it returns to him a very gratifying sum each year. Politically 
he is a republican but has never been ambitious to hold office. In fact 
he has always found that his business affairs make full demand upon 
his time and energies, and his success is attributable to the fact tliat 
he has ever been persistent in purpose and straightforward and hon- 
orable in all his dealings. 



G. W. BROWN. 



G. W. Brown, a resident farmer of Penn townsliip, his home being 
on section 14, was born two miles south of Wyoming on the 20th of 
]May, 1862, his parents being C. W. and PLlizabeth (Henderson) 
Brown, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Peoria. It 
was in the year 18.)4 that the father came with his parents to Stark 
county and through the intervening period, covering more than sixty 
years, the family has been actively identified witli tlie agricultural 
develojiment and jjrogress of this section of the state. 

G. W. Brown has spent his entire life in Stark county and after 
mastering the elementary branches of learning taught in the public 
schools he attended school in Castleton and also at Normal, Illinois. 
He then returned to tlie farm to take u]) the occupation to which he 
had been reared and since then has put all of the fine modern improve- 
ments upon the place. He has here a palatial residence — one of Stark 
county's most beautiful homes. It is elevated some feet and the lawn 
in front of the liouse is terraced. His farm comprises two hundred 
and foi-ty acres of land, the value and productiveness of which are 
constantly enhanced by tlie methods which he employs in its cultiva- 
tion. In addition to raising the cereals best adapted to soil and 
climate he began lireeding Hereford white faced cattle ten years aao 
and at the head of his herd is a fine full. Twyford Protector, imj^orted 
from England. In addition Mr. Brown has engaged in the breed- 
ing of horses and hogs but does not do so at the jjresent time. He 
lias also engaged quite extensively in feeding stock and is regarded 
as one of the foremost representatives of live stock interests in this 
part of the state. He has two sets of improvements upon his place 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 249 

ami in all of his I'arin work has niaiiifestL-d a most progressive spirit. 
Three years ago he brought into the locality the first tractor here used 
and enterprise has dominated his work at all points in his career. 

In June, 1886, JNIr. Brown was united in marriage to INIiss Lucy 
E. Swayne, of Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, by whom he has four 
chihh'en, as follows: Jessie LeRoy, who is engaged in farming south- 
east of AVyoming; Hazel L., the wife of Ross R. Raker, of Buffalo, 
New York; and ^lyra and Chester, both at home. 

^Ir. and Mrs. lirown attend the ^Methodist Episcopal church, and 
jNIr. Brown holds membershij) in the jModern Woodmen camj) at 
Castleton. His political allegiance is given to the republican party 
but the honors and emoluments of office have no attraction for him. 
as he prefers to concentrate his efforts upon his business affairs and 
through wise management, close application and determined purpose 
he has won the success which is now his and which has gained for him 
a ])lace among the most substantial and representative farmers of his 
native countv. 



DAYID CARSTAIRS. 



David Carstairs, living on section 17. Cioshen township, is now 
sei'ving as the representative of that townshi]) on the board of county 
sujjcrvisors and is activelj'^ engaged in farming, being the owner of a 
place of sixty acres that is neat and well improved. He came to Stark 
county in 1876, in which year he crossed the Atlantic from Scotland, 
his birth having occurred in Perthshire, that country, on the 18th of 
]May. 18.).'5. There he was reared to manhood ujion a farm, dividing 
his time between the work of the fields and the acquirement of a public 
school education. He made the trij) to the new world in company 
with Davis Lowman, bringing with them a bunch of shorthorn cattle 
from Scotland. lianding at Xew York, they made their way direct 
to Toulon and for a short time INIr. Carstairs was employed by JNIr. 
Lowman upon his farm near Toulon. In 1870 he went to Texas, 
whei'e he joined a Cf)nstruction outfit working on the Santa Fe Rail- 
road. He continued with that company for fifteen years, working 
in New Mexico, California and Ai'izona, spending about three yeai's 
in the vicinity of Los Angeles. In 1898 he returned to Illinois and in 
1004 ])urchase(I the land whereon he now resides. In the intervening 
period he has spent considerable time in the further cultivation and 
develo2)ment of this property. 



250 HISTOllY OF STARK COUNTY 

In Goshen townshij), in 1894, ]Mr. Carstair.s was married to Miss 
3Iargaret Frail, a daughter of Barnabas Frail, who was one of the 
first settlers of the count}', arriving in 183.5. JMrs. Carstairs was born 
and reared in Goshen township and was here married. 

Subsequent to this INIr. Carstairs again went to Arizona in con- 
nection with railroad construction, spending the succeeding foin- years 
in such work in that state and in California, tlius completing the 
fifteen-year period previously mentioned. He resided in La Fayette 
while putting up the buildings upon his farm and making the necessary 
impi'ovements. He has erected a pleasant residence supplied with 
]'unning water, furnace heat, electric lights and telephone connection. 
In fact this is one of the thoroughly modern and up-to-date homes of 
the township, providing them with many of the modern comforts of 
life. He has also erected good barns and other necessary out- 
buildings for the shelter of grain and stock. Since December, 191.). 
he has resided upon this place, which is today one of the neatest and 
best improved farms in Goshen township, and in addition to this place 
lie cultivates an eighty-acre tract adjoining his own land. 

INIr. and jMrs. Carstairs have a daughter, Katherine, who was 
graduated from the State Normal School at Normal, Illinois, in 191.5 
and now liolds the position of registrar at that institution. They also 
lost a son, David, who passed away in 1913 at the age of fifteen years. 

Both Mr. and JMrs. Carstairs are Avidely and favorably known in 
the county where they make their home. His has been an active and 
useful life and unremitting industry has constituted the I)asis upon 
whicli he has builded his success — success that now ranks him among 
the substantial agriculturists of his community. 



W. C. WILLIAMS. 



W. C. Williams is successfully engaged in business in Wady 
Petra, Stark county and also has ten acres of land there planted to 
fruit. He was born in Chicago on the 9th of April, 1872, and is a 
son of William and Elizabeth (Roberts) Williams, both natives of 
Wales, altliough their marriage occurred in Chicago. Tlie father was 
a pattern maker and carpenter and passed away in 1899. The mother 
died in 1907. 

iVfter completing his ])ublic school course in Chicago W. C. AVil- 
liams attended the Kansas Normal University at Salina for some 
time. On beginning his independent career he engaged in farming 



IIISTOKY OF STARK COUNTY 251 

and stock raising in Osage county, Kansas, where he remained until 
1910, when he located in Wady Petra, Stark county, Illinois. He 
bought the grain and lumber business here formerly conducted by 
Virginius Chase and at the present time also deals in heavy hard- 
ware and farm implements. He owns the elevator and warehouse and 
has built up a large and profitable trade. He also owns ten acres of 
land which was devoted to pasture when it came into his possession 
seven years ago but is now set out in fruit, including grapes, straw- 
berries, raspberries, apples and pears. All of his business interests are 
ca])ably managed and he has gained a gratifying measure of financial 
success. 

In 190.3 ]Mr. Williams was united in marriage to INIiss Ethel 
Booth, and they have three cliildren, namely. Ruth, Walter and 
Helen. JNIr. \Villiams casts his ballot in support of the candidates 
and measures of the democratic party. In religious faith Mrs. Wil- 
liams is a JNIethodist and he is identified with the Masonic blue lodge 
and chapter at Wyoming. He has gained a high jilace in the estima- 
tion of his fellow citizens since coming to Stark county and is recog- 
nized as a man of much business ability. 



QUINCY I. GRAVES. 



Quincy I. Graves, who is successfully conducting a livery and feed 
barn at Wyoming, was formerh^ engaged in farming and still owns 
one hundred and sixty acres of good land. He was born in Essex 
township. Stark county, on the "iSth of September, 1873, of the mar- 
riage of B. F. and INIary E. (Weber) Graves, a sketch of whom 
a])pears elsewhere in this work. He was reared upon the home farm 
and divided his time between assisting his father and attending the 
district schools. When twenty-one years of age he commenced farm- 
ing on his own account and some time later purchased eighty acres of 
land, to which he has since added a similar tract, so that he holds title 
to one hundred and sixty acres, all of which is under cultivation. He 
followed agricultural pursuits for a number of years, and his ])ractical 
and ])rogressive methods and bis good business management enabled 
him to secure a good income from his land. In the spring of 191.5, 
hoAvever, he removed to Wyoming and built a large livery barn and 
since that time has concentrated his energies u])on the development of 
a livery and feed business. His experience with horses and grain while 



252 HISTORY OF. STARK COUXTY 

upon the farm has been of vahie to him in this new nndertaking and 
he has fonnd it profitable. 

]Mr. Graves was married in 1894 to JNIiss Ada J. Simnierman, a 
daughter of A. J. Simmerman. Three children ha^e been born to this 
union : Ruth 31.. the wife of Reuben Shaw, wlio is operating our sub- 
ject's farm in Essex township: and Yerna and Earl, both at home. 

!Mr. Graves indorses the principles of tlie democratic party and 
supports its candidates at national elections l)ut where oiilv local issues 
are at stake votes independently. He holds menil)ership in the Inde- 
pendent Order of Odd Fellows at AVyoming and is popular within 
and without that organization. He has depended upon his own enter- 
prise and good judgment for success, and the prosperity which he has 
gained is well deserved. 



B. W. CRUM. 



B. W. Crimi is engaged in general agricultural pursuits on section 
17, Penn township, and aside from this has been actively identified 
with the woi'k of improvement and development in the locality, both 
as an office holder and through his support of those agencies which 
, work for the moral ui)lift of the commimity. He was born in Hunt- 
ingdon county. Pennsylvania, on the 13th of October. 18.50. and 
is a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Hess) Crum, who were born, 
reared and marrietl in the Keystone state and in 1859 brought their 
family to Illinois, settling in Penn township. Stark county, upon the 
farm now owned by J. A. Bunnell. For a time the father rented the 
land and then purchased the farm on ^\■hich his son is now living. 
He had imjjroved two good farms in this county ere he passed away, 
his death occurring upon what was then his home place, a half mile 
soutli of the present residence of B. W. Crum. In early life he had 
learned the miller's trade but after coming to Stark covinty con- 
tinuously engaged in general agricultural pursuits until his death, 
which occurred in 1890. The family was of German extraction. 

B. W. Crinn was educated in the common schools, which he 
attended for a brief period in Pennsylvania, while later he continued 
as a student in the district schools near the home farm in Stark county 
and for one term was a student in Buda. He took up the profession of 
teaching, which he followed for six years in his home locality, impart- 
ing clearly and readily to others the knowledge that he had ac^iuired. 
so that he proved one of the capable educators of the neighborhood. 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 253 

At tlie time of his marriage, however, he took up the occupation of 
farming and he is now the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of 
arable land on sections 17 and "20 Penn township, to which he has 
added excellent improvements in keeping with the spirit of modern 
p]-ogress along agricultural lines. He also owns one hundred and 
sixty acres of land in ^liner county. South Dakota, and his prosperity 
is attributable entirelj' to his own efforts. 

In 1881 INIr. Crum Avas vmited in marriage to INIiss Laura Swayne, 
by whom he had five children, as follows: one who died in infancy: 
Atalie, who is the wife of Claud Sterling and resides three miles east 
of her father's farm; Dean D., wdio passed away in 1916; and Gains 
and Scott S., both at home. 

]Mr. Crum has ever been deeply interested in the welfare of his 
community and especially in its moral progress. Although not a 
mcnibLT of the ^Methodist Protestant church, he was a generous con- 
ti-ibutor to the erection of its first house of worship, which was burned 
down in 191i5, after which he was one of the first to start the move- 
ment for the erection of the present church. His wife is a member of 
the Brethren church. In politics he is a republican-progressive and he 
is now filling the office of assessor. For a number of years he served as 
justice of the peace and is again in the office. He has also been 
school treasurer in his township for thii'ty-five consecutive years and 
he is statistical croj) reporter for the county. He has been president 
of the ^Memorial Association of the township since its organization and 
he is a charter member of the IModern Woodmen camp at Castleton. 
His has been an active and well spent life, in which he recognizes every 
duty and meets every obligation. At the same time he has carefully 
managed and directed his business affairs and the Avise use he has made 
of his time, talents and opportunities has gained him substantial and 
well deserved success. 



SAMUEL MALOXE. 



Samuel ^lalone. who is engaged in general farming on a tract of 
land of one hundred and thirty-seven acres on section 6. Penn town- 
ship, which he owns, Avas born on the 19th of October, 1867. in ]Mar- 
shall county. Illinois, upon a farm north of Campgrove, then occupied 
by his parents, Samuel and ^Margaret (^NlcConnell) ^lalone, both of 
whom Avere natives of County DoAvn, Ireland. On leaving the country 
thev crossed the Atlantic to the United States and were married 



254 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

here. For a time they resided in ]Marsliall county but on the 8th of 
IMarch, 187.5, took up their abode upon a farm on section 6, Penn 
township, Stark comity, there spending their remaining days. 
The father died June 13, 1898, and the mother survived until July 
2, 1902, when slie also passed away. In early life JMr. jMalone had 
devoted his attention to mining but after coming to Illinois took up 
the occupation of farming, which he ever afterward followed. 

Samuel JMalone is indebted to the public school system of the 
state for the educational privileges which he enjoyed. He has al\^•ay^s 
lived upon the home farm, taking care of his father and mother and 
assuming the active management of the business. He now owns one 
hundred and thirty-seven acres of land, giving his attention to general 
farming, his labors being attended with a substantial measvn-e of suc- 
cess as he carries on tlie work of tilling the soil and developing the 
crojis. His judgment in matters relative to the farm and its develop- 
ment is sound and his labors are bringing good return. 

In 1903 JMr. JMalone was united in marriage to JMiss Bertha JMill- 
slagle. l)y whom he has five children, namely: Edna JMargaret, Charles 
H., JMary Elizal)eth. Lloyd Eugene and Bernice. JMr. JMalone votes 
with the democratic party and keeps in touch with the vital questions 
and problems of the day but does not seek nor desire political office, 
preferring to concentrate his energies rather upon his home problems 
that arise in connection with the further development and improve- 
ment of his farm. 



WALTER X. CHAJMPIOX. 

Walter N. Champion, who is engaged in general farming on sec- 
tion 34, Osceola township, owns and cultivates one hundred and sixty 
acres of rich and arable land and also is farming another tract of 
eighty acres. He was born on the 1.5th of JMay, 1870, on the farm 
which is still his home, his parents being Edward H. and Hannali E. 
(Drawyer) Champion, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the 
latter of JVew York. They were married, however, in this county 
and for a number of years tliey resided on a farm northwest of 
Bradford but eventually purchased the place ui)on which Walter 
X. Cliampion uom- resides. The father added many improvements to 
the jn-operty and there remained until his death. His wife has also 
passed away. They bad a family of eight children but only two of 



mmm of uinois 

ORBAm 




MU. AM) .MRS. WAI.TKK X. (HA.MI'lilX 




NOLAN ARN(.)Ll) AND VERNA MAHIK ( IIA.Ml'ION 



LIDRARY 

UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

URBANA 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 259 

the number are now living, Walter X. and Henry, the latter located 
near Modena, Illinois. 

Sjjending- his youthful days under the parental roof, Walter X. 
Champion became a public school pupil and his practical business 
training was received under the direction of his father. He early 
began work in the fields and upon the death of his parents he took over 
the old home property, comj^rising one hundred and sixty acres of 
excellent farming land. This he now carefully cultivates, its further 
development occupying his time and energies together with the cul- 
tivation of an eighty-acre tract which belongs to his two children. 

In the year 1900 ]Mr. Champion was married to JNIiss Clara N. 
Imes and they had four children: Isla, now deceased; one who died 
in infancy; Xolan Arnold and Verna jNIarie, both at home. The 
I)ai'ents attend the ]Methodist Episcopal church and guide their lives 
according to its teachings. In politics IMr. Champion is an earnest 
rejjublican and fraternally is connected with the Independent Order 
of Odd Fellows. He and his wife are hosi)itable people and their home 
is ever ojjen for the reception of the many friends that thev have in 
their section of the countj'. IMr. Champion has been a lifelong resident 
of Osceola township and has therefore witnessed much of its growth 
and development as the work of improvement has been carried for- 
ward, bringing about a notable transformation. 



WILLIAM E. XixON. 

William E. X^ixon has been clerk of Stark county for fourteen 
years, liis continued return to that office indicating his satisfactory 
services. He was formerly actively engaged in newspaper publica- 
tion and during the eighteen years that he owned and edited the Post- 
Herald at Wyoming, Illinois, he made it one of the leading weekly 
l)a])ers in this part of the state. 

INIr. X^ixon was born in Toulon on the 14th of X^ovember, 18.59, 
a son of Edward and ^Margaret (Kenney) Xixon, both natives of 
Komney, Hampshire county. West A'irginia. In earlj' life they 
removed to Peoria county, Illinois, where their marriage occurred on 
the 22d of December, 1853. Three years later they located in Toulon, 
wliich remained their home until they were called by death. The 
father's demise occurred on the 8th of ]May, 1883, Avhen he M'as fifty- 
nine years old, and the mother's on the 21st of January, 1909, M'hen 
seventy-seven years old. They became the parents of four children : 



260 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

Charles E., now living in Peoria, Illinois; Enima M., who married 
JNIanning A. Hall on the 29th of December, 1880, and died in New 
Salem, Kansas, on the 9th of Jmie, 1889, at the age of thirty-two 
years, leaving three children, jNIaurice, Edward and Claude: \\'illiam 
E.; and Frank C, who died in Peoria on the 2Gth of ^larch, 1902, 
when thirty-eight years old. The i^atenial grandparents of our sub- 
ject, William and Mary (Cheshire) Xixon, were among the pioneers 
of Peoria county, Illinois, removing there from West Virginia in 
September, 1831. 

William E. Xixon received a liigh school education in Toulon and 
wlien only fifteen years old began his newspaper career in the office 
of the Stark Comity News at Toulon. He applied himself diligently 
to learning everything possible connected with the printing and pub- 
lisliing business and in October, 1880, with a partner founded the 
Stark County Sentinel, also at Toulon. After conducting that paper 
for two years he disposed of his interest therein to J. Knox Hall in 
May, 1882, but on the 1st of Jamiary, 1889, he again became one of the 
newspaper publishers of the county, jjurchasing the Post-Herald at 
"Wyoming, Illinois. For eighteen years he devoted the greater part 
of his time to its publication and it gained recognition as one of the 
most influential and best liuown weeklies in central Illinois. He built 
up an efficient news service whicli enabled him to give liis readers com- 
plete and reliable accounts of local events, and through his editorial 
page he worked constantly and effectively for tlie advancement of 
Wyoming and Stark county. In September, 1907, he sold the paper 
and has since given practically his entire time to his official duties. 

It was in Xovember, 1902. that ^Ir. Xixon was elected clerk of 
Stark county and on taking office he removed to Toulon. He was re- 
elected in 1906, 1910 and 1914, receiving at each election the highest 
vote of any candidate on the county ticket, an unusual tribute, which 
speaks much for his personal popularity and the confidence which his 
fellow citizens repose in his ability. Since taking up liis residence in 
Toulon he has held other official positions, as for seven years he has 
been a member of the school board and for five years has served on the 
city council. He was cliairman of the board of local improvements, 
which devised and installed the present splendid system of water- 
works, and his duties in that connection made heavy demands upon his 
time and attention. While living in Wyoming he was for five terms 
city clerk and for five years a member of the school board. 

INIr. X'^ixon was married in Toulon on the 30th of X^ovember. 1882, 
to INIiss I^ottie R. Brace, Avho was born in Elmira, Illinois, on the 
l.'ith of Januarv, 18G2. Her father, Orlando Brace, was born in 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 261 

Elmira on the 8th of August, 1838, a son of JNIyrtle G. and Phebe 
(Munson) Brace, pioneers of Stark county. On the 10th of Sep- 
tember, 1862, he enhsted for service in the Civil war, joining Company 
A. One Hundred and Twenty-fourtli Ilhnois Vohinteer Infantry, 
and was at the front for three years. He saw much active service 
and in the battle of Spanish Fort, Alabama, on the 2d of April, 1805, 
was severely wounded. After the close of hostilities he returned to 
Illinois and in November, 1873, was elected treasurer of Stark county 
and removed to Toulon. He made an excellent record in that office, 
which he held until December, 1886. His demise occurred on the r2th 
of December, 1909, when he was seventy-one years old. He was 
married on the 13tli of February, 1861, to Lucy A. Hudson, who was 
a daughter of Daniel and JMary (Mayhew) Hudson, natives of Ohio, 
who settled in Stark county, Illinois, in 18.5.5. She passed away on the 
litli of December, 1910, when seventy years old. To Mr. and jMrs. 
Brace were born seven children: JMrs. Nixon; Luella jNI., who was 
married on the 2.5th of December, 1882, to Frank S. Rosseter, now 
deceased, and who died on the 8th of December, 1902, in California, 
in her fortieth year, leaving two daughters, JNIyrtle, the wife of Benja- 
min R. Saunders, and Ethel L.; Frank B.; Florence B., the widow of 
Frank L. Kinney; Harry W.; George M.; and Edith L., the wife of 
George C. Christ. Mr. and Mrs. Nixon have three children, as fol- 
lows: Edward B., wlio is engaged in newspaper work in Peoria, 
Illinois, was married on the 12th of December, 1906, to Adeline L. 
Bradley, a daughter of Henry C. and Alberta (Edwards) Bradlej% 
of Toulon, and they have two sons, Bradley and Paul. Grace F. was 
married on the 1.5th of .Tune, 191.5, to Dr. jNIartin R. Chase, a son 
of .Jose])!) and Sarah (Rist) Chase, of Toulon. She and her husband 
now live in Chicago. Paul O., Avho is assistant cashier in the State 
Bank of Toulon, is living at home. 

INIr. Nixon has been a lifelong republican and has done much 
efficient work in behalf of that party. In religious faith he is a Con- 
gregationalist, and he is also identified witli the INIasonic order. He 
was raised a Master IVIason in Toulon lodge. No. 93, in December, 
1881, and when he liecame a resident of Wyoming transferred his 
membership to Wyoming Eodge, No. 479, of which lie served as 
worshii)ful master in 1891, 1892, 1894, 189.5, 1901 and 1902. In 1909 
lie was master of the Toidon lodge, with which he is again identified. 
In 1901 he was high priest of Wyoming Chapter, No. 133, R. A. M. 
He is likewise identified with the Order of the Eastern Star and with 
the Modern Woodmen of America. In addition to attending to his 
nrivate business interests and his official duties, he has been active in 



262 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

all matters 2)ertaining to the promotion of the social and material wel- 
fare of the eoninmiiity in which he lives, and his public spirit is 
generally recognized. Mrs. Nixon received her education in the Tou- 
lon schools, and is a member of the Congregational church and of the 
Order of the Eastern Star, and in the last named order served as 
worthy matron of Wyoming Chapter in 1897 and of Toulon Chapter 
in 1913. 



JOHN W. WALTERS. 

John W. Walters, who since 189.5 has been a partner in the bank- 
ing house now conducted under the name of Scott, ^Valters &: Rake- 
straw at Wyoming, was born July 26, 18.54, at Ashboiu'ne, Derl)y- 
shire, England. His father, the Rev. William Walters, Avas born at 
INIayfiekl, Staffordshire, England, and wedded Sarah Neal, whose 
birth occurred in Derby, England. Following the birth of their five 
children they came to the new world, making their way to ^Vyoming, 
Illinois, in November, 1870. The father became the first pastor of 
the Congregational church of Wyoming, which he aided in founding 
in 1873. He continued to fill that pastorate for a decade and then 
again from 1893 until 1900. Between those two periods he was ])as- 
tor of the Congregational churches at Lacon, Illinois, and at Hastings 
and Long Pine, Nebraska. He passed away in Wyoming in 1900, 
greatly esteemed and beloved by all. His life had been of marked 
influence for good in the comnumity. his teachings being of far-reach- 
ing and beneficial effect and leaving their impress upon the lives of 
many Avith whom he came in contact. His Avife died in 1872. 

John W. Walters pursued his education in St. John's Academy in 
his natiA'e city to the age of sixteen years, Avhen he came Avith his 
parents to the ncAv Avorld. He embarked in the mercantile business 
in Wyoming in 1878 as a partner of A. G. Hannnond and was thus 
actively identified AA-ith commercial affairs of the city until 189.5, Avhen 
he became a factor in financial circles, entering into partnership Avith 
the banking fii-m of Scott, Wrigley & Hammond. Avhich is iioav Scott, 
■Walters & RakestraAv. In this connection he is bending his efforts 
to administrative direction and executive control, and during the past 
twenty-one years he has contributed in no small measin-e to the suc- 
cess of the institution. He is also a director of the Stark County 
Telephone Com])any and oAvns considerable real estate in Illinois and 
other sections of the countrA*. 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 263 

On the Kith of, June, 1877, at Wyoming, JNIr. Walters was married 
to Miss Aliee B. Wrigley, a (laughter of John ^Vrigley, who was born 
at Haywood, Lancashire, England, and was associated with George 
W. Scott in founding the hank of Scott & Wrigley at Wyoming in 
1870. JNIr. and INlrs. Walters have become the parents of seven chil- 
dren: Arthur John; Sarah Anne, now the wife of Plerbert L. ^liller, 
of Danville, Illinois; Florence Louise, the wife of John R. Dexter, 
of Ardmore, Oklahoma; AVilliam Alfred, of Leroy, Illinois, who 
married IMiss Hilda Wliite, of St. Joseph. ]Missouri; and Edith Alice, 
Helen JNIary and Harold Wrigley Scott, all at home. 

]Mr. Walters has adhered to the religious faith of his father and 
has long been a very active and prominent member of the Congrega- 
tional church, in which he has served as trustee and treasurer for many 
years. That he is interested in the intellectual progress of the com- 
munity is shown by the fact that he has served for nineteen years as a 
member of the board of education of Wyoming. His political al- 
legiance is given to the republican party, and fraternally he is con- 
nected with the Masons, belonging to the lodge, chapter and Eastern 
Star. A resident of Wyoming from the age of sixteen years, he i.-) 
well known here as one of the pronu'nent, representative and honoi-ed 
citizens, his life having ever nieasvu'ed up to the highest standards of 
manhood and citizenship. 



G. W. INIERNA. 



An excellent farm of one hundred and sixty acres, situated on sec- 
tion 28, Penn toAvnship, is the property of G. W. Merna, who 
located thereon about six years ago and here in addition to general 
farming he is engaged in the raising of Clydesdale horses, becoming 
A\'eH known as a leading dealer of his comnuinity. He was born in 
the township in which he still makes his home on the IStli of Se])tem- 
ber, 1874, his parents being George and Mary F. (Bateman) INIerna, 
the former a native of England and the latter of Ohio. On coming 
to the United States the father settled first at Fall River, Massachu- 
setts, but afterward made his way into the interior of the country and 
became a resident of Stark county, where he passed away in the fall 
of 1012 after having devoted many years to general agricultural pur- 
suits in this locality. His widow still survives and yet occupies the 
old home farm in Penn township. 

No special event occurred to vary the routine of farm life for G. 



264 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

W. 31eriia in his boj^hood and youth. He worked upon the old home 
phice from early boyhood when not busy with his textbooks and 
af'tei' leaving school concentrated his entire attention upon the farm 
work until he reached the age of twenty-seven years. He then began 
farming on his own account on a tract of land south of his present 
home and came to this farm in 1910. In the intervening period he 
has erected a large, substantial barn and other outbuildings and has 
lighted the place with electricity broifght from Wyoming. This land 
is divided into fields of convenient size by well kept fences and A\ithin 
the boundaries of the place are comprised one hundred and sixty acres 
of land. Stock raising has to some extent been followed by him, 
his attention lieing now given to Clydesdale horses, and he has also 
engaged in feeding stock. 

In 1901 ]Mr. jNIerna was imited in marriage to ]Miss Emma Taylor, 
a native of Rock Island, Illinois, by whom he has two children, Ber- 
nice and Gladys. The parents attend the ]\Iethodist Protestant 
church, of which Mr. IMerna is one of the trustees. Plis jiolitical 
allegiance is given the republican party but he lias never sought or 
desired office. He has, however, served as school trustee. Fraternally 
he is well known as a ^Slason, belonging to the lodge and chapter at 
^Vyonling. He has also filled all of the offices in the Odd Fellows 
lodge at Castleton and he is widely known and popular among the 
memliers of those organizations, who recognize his sterling worth and 
know that his life is molded along lines that have their root in honor- 
able ])rinciples. Having always lived in Penn township, his life his- 
toi-y is as an open book and many who know him speak of him in 
terms of warm regard. 



. EDWARD C. CAVERLY. 

I'rogressive agriculture in Stark county finds a worthy represen- 
tative in Edward C. Caverly, who resides on section 16, Toulon town- 
shi]). There he is successfully engaged in tilling the soil and also in 
the breeding and raising of Poland China hogs. He is the owner of 
one hundred and sixty acres of land constituting a neat and well 
impi-oved Tarm, and the enterprise which he displays in its manage- 
ment results in the attainment of gratifying success. He has always 
lived in Stark county, his birth liaving here occurred September 21, 
1868. 

His father, William P. Caverly, was born in Ireland and was 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 265 

tliere reared to mature years. ^Vhen a young man he came with a sis- 
ter to the new wt)rl(l and for a time resided in New York citj', 
where he learned the carpenter's trade. He afterward removed west- 
ward to Toulon, where he followed his trade and also did contract 
work. He erected the first Board of Trade building in Peoria and 
othe)' important structures of that period stand as monuments to his 
skill and handiwork. Purchasing land, he established his home upon 
a farm in Toulon township and thereon reared his family. He was 
for years one of the public-spirited citizens of Stark county, where he 
served as supervisor and in other positions of honor and trust. He 
started out in life a poor boy among strangers, but he accumulated 
^vealth quite rapidly and was long numbered among the prosi^erous 
and substantial citizens and men of affluence in Stark county. His 
])rosperity resulted from his sound judgment, his close application and 
his indefatigable industry. He spent his last years in Toulon, whei^e 
he passed away about 1912, and his widow, who still survives him, 
makes her home in Toulon. 

Edward C. Caverly was reared on the old homestead, remaining 
with his father luitil he reached the age of twenty-five years, during 
wliich ])eriod he assisted in the active work of the fields. In March, 
189.'J, he was united in marriage to Miss Sierra Nevada Ward, who 
was born in Illinois and was reared and educated in Toulon. 

After their marriage iNIr. and jNIrs. Caverly took uj) their a])ode 
on the place where they still make their home. With characteristic 
energy he began to till the soil and further improved the place and 
today his farm is one of the attractive features of the landscape. 
There is a large and pleasant residence built in modern style of 
architecture, lighted with gas and supplied with hot and cold water 
throughout the house. In fact this is one of the finest farm resi- 
dences in Toulon township and is an evidence of the progressive spirit 
of the owner. In the rear of the dwelling stands a substantial barn 
and other outbuildings that furnish ample shelter for grain and stock. 
He uses the latest improved farm machinery in carrying on the work 
of the fields and all of his land is tillable. For years he has been quite 
extensively engaged in breeding and selling pure blooded Poland 
China hogs and is now one of the foremost representatives of the 
business in Stark county. For some years he has held two ])ublic sales 
annually and he also sells at private sale. Iji addition he has filled 
orders from distant points, shipping some fine animals to various 
states. 

]Mr. and INIrs. Caverly have become ])arents of a son, Charles, 
who is now a student in the township high school at Toulon. The 



266 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

famih' is well known in their part of the county and warm regard is 
entei'tained for them by all with whom they have come in contact. 
Politically jNlr. Caverly is independent, voting for men and measures 
rather than party. His entire attention has been concentrated upon 
his business affairs and his persistency of purpose has brought to him 
substantial and gratifying success. 



JAMES T. ROGERS. 



James T. Rogers, who owns and operates a half section of fine 
land in Penn township, is giving the greater part of his attention to 
the I'aising of Clydesdale horses and shorthorn cattle. His birth 
occurred in Peoria county, Illinois, on the 22d of August, 18.51. and 
he is a son of Henry jNI. and Emily (Evans) Rogers. The father was 
born in the vicinity of New York city and the mother, Winchester, 
Virginia. In 18.'38 Henry ]\I. Rogers migrated westward and took up 
a claim near Princeville, Peoria county, Illinois, which he improved 
until 18.j7- In tliat year he came to Valley township. Stark county, 
and took up his residence upon a tract of good land on section 4. He 
Avas a successful agriculturist and at the time of his death was in 
excellent circumstances. He was held in high esteem by his fellow 
citizens and for about thirteen years served as supervisor. His death 
occurred in 1878, and his wife died in 1897. 

James T. Rogers attended the schools of Galva and Peoria and 
after completing the work of the public schools took a commercial 
course. He then returned to the farm and assisted his father in its 
management until the latter's death, when he took charge of its oj^era- 
tion. Later he bought land a mile south of the homestead in Valley 
townshij) and lived there for three years. He next purchased a farm 
in Penn township, and for twenty-five years has resided ujjon that 
place. He has erected all of the buildings, which are modern and 
substantial, and also planted a fine grove, which adds not a little to 
the attractiveness and value of the farm. His ])lace comprises three 
hundred and twenty acres on section 33, Penn township, and is one 
of the best improved farms in the neighborhood. For ten years he 
has raised Clydesdale horses, and he also breeds shorthorn cattle. His 
stock is of high grade and commands a good i)rice on the market. 

In 1886 Mr. Rogers was united in marriage to IMiss Emma Jar- 
man, who passed away in 1912, leaving three children: Clarence 
Alvin, Ethel and Vira, all at home. 



LIBRARY 
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 






HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 269 

jNIr. Rogers supports the democratic party at the polls and for 
seven or eight years held the office of commissioner of Yalley town- 
ship, and he has also filled other positions of trust. He holds member- 
ship in the Pleasant Valley church, and fraternally is connected with 
the Masonic blue lodge and chapter at W'yoniing, the INIodern AVood- 
men of America at Wyoming, and the JMaccal)ees also of that jjlacc. 
His life has been characterized by energy and business acumen, and 
these qualities, together with his willingness to adopt new methods 
when their value has been shown, insure his continued prosjierity. 



CHRISTIE SORENSOX. 

Christie Sorenson is the owner of Springdale Farm, a property of 
one hundred and ten acres situated a mile west of Toulon, on the 
Logan Lee highway. Forty-five years have come and gone since he 
arrived in Illinois, for he is a native of Denmark. He was born Sep- 
tember (I, 1849, and in his childhood accom])anied his parents on their 
emigration to the new world, the family home being established in 
Winnebago, Wisconsin. When he was a youth of fifteen he left home 
and went to INIuskegon county, INIichigan, where he was employed in 
tlie timber woods and sawmills and in fact worked at any em])loyment 
that he could secure which would yield him an honest living and gain 
him a start in life. In time he became an expert sawyer and com- 
manded high wages. 

In Muskegon county, in 1869, when a young man of twenty years, 
]Mr. Sorenson was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Walling, who 
was born in Stark county, Illinois. In 1871 they came to this state, 
settling in Toulon, where Mr. Sorenson was employed in various wavFd 
He afterward rented land for several years and diu'ing that 
period carefully saved his earnings until he was able to purchase a 
ti'act of one hundred and eighty acres on section 2.5. He took up his 
abode upon that place and with characteristic energy began its 
development, residing there for fifteen years, during which his laboi-s 
wrought a marked transformation in the appearance of the place. He 
erected a good frame residence, also barns and sheds and in the work 
of the fields displayed unfaltering energy as well as practical 
knowledge of the best methods of tilling the soil. In 1908 he rented 
the farm and removed to Toulon, where he spent the succeeding five 
vears. there purchasing a residence lot and erecting thereon a 
pleasant home which he still owns. 



270 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

In 1898 ]Mr. Sorensun lo.st his wilV, who passed away leaving- two 
cliildren: AVilliani PI., a resident of Toulon; and Charles II., of Colo- 
rado. Roth are married. On the 4th of JMarch, 1891, in Tonlon, ^Ir. 
Sorenson was again married, his second union heing with ]Mrs. Levina 
Claybaugh. nee Kincade, a widow, who was horn in ^Missouri. Ry 
this marriage there were three children, of whom two are living: 
Claia. the wife of William Goodwin, of Toulon; and jMarj- Leona, 
who is a student in the Toulon high school. 

In 191.) ]Mr. Sorenson settled upon his j^resent farm on section 
23, Goshen township, and has already begun to make substantial 
improvements there. In politics he is identified with the republican 
party, and, while never an office seeker, has served as road commis- 
sioner. He belongs to the Odd Fellows lodge at Toulon, in wiiieh he 
has filled all of the chairs and is now a past grand. He is likewise 
identified with the ^Modern \Voodmen of America and both he and 
his wife are members of the Toulon Raptist church, in the work of 
which he is deejily and helpfully interested. He is now serving as one 
of the officers of the church and he also has a Siniday school class of 
tAventy-one boys, so that he is taking active ])art in promoting the 
moral progress of the community. Those who know him speak of him 
in terms of high regard, for his entire career has been guided by lofty 
principles and over his life record there falls no shadow of wrong or 
suspicion of evil. 



I. F. STEWARD. 



I. F. Steward, who is devoting his attention to farming on section 
4, Penn townshij), is a native of Stark county, his birth occurring in 
Osceola township on the ^^d of February, 1866. He is a son of 
Xathan D. and Julia C. (Kinyan) Steward, natives respectively of 
Elaine and Pennsylvania. They were married, however, in Stark 
county, Illinois, and the father engaged in farming land in Osceola 
townshi]) for many years. He still resides upon his land although lie 
has now given the operation of his farm over to others. 

I. F. Steward was reared under the i)arental roof and received his 
education in the common schools. He assisted his father until he was 
twenty-seven years old. \\hen he removed to Penn township and 
rented land. At length he was able to buy one hundred and seven- 
teen acres in that townshi]^. which he subsequently sold, however, 
buying his present farm, which adjoins his original holdings. He has 



HISTOliY OF STARK COLXTV 271 

remodeled the residence and barns and also made other improvements 
upon the place and keeps everything in excellent condition. His home 
farm comjirises one hundred and twenty-five acres, and he also has 
an interest in an undivided sixty-five acre tract. He feeds a large 
number of cattle and hogs annually and derives a good income 
from the sale of his stock. The success which he has gained is doubly 
creditable in that it is due directly to his own well directed efforts. 

In 1892 Mr. Steward was united in marriage to INIiss Stella C. 
Sterling, and they have a son, Ross E.. ^vho is at home. Mr. Steward 
is a stanch rei)ublican and for twelve years held the oHice of road 
commissioner, while for many years he served as school director. He 
belf)ngs to the Odd Fellows lodge of Castleton and to the JModern 
Woodmen of America at Bradford and is also identified with the 
JMethodist Protestant church, of which his wife is likewise a mem- 
ber. He has thoroughly identified his interests with those of Stark 
county, in which he has passed his entire life, and his stanchest friends 
are those who have known him intimately since bojdiood. 



WILLIAM H. PARISH. 

William H. Parish, living on section 14, Goshen township, is 
busily employed in the further development of his farm of three 
hundred and twenty acres, which is pleasantly and conveniently 
located within four miles of Toulon. The farm is most pleashig in its 
appearance because of the many improvements that have been ])ut 
upon it and tlie well kept condition of the fields. JNIr. Parish was born 
in the township in which he still resides, his birth having occurred on 
his father's old homestead February 16, 18.>9. He is a son of Pethuel 
Parish, now of Toulon and one of the largest landowners of Stark 
county. 

U])on the old homestead William H. Parish accjuainted himself 
witii all the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist, 
enjoyed those pleasures which give zest to boyhood and in the neigh.- 
boring schools mastered the lessons which qualified him for life's 
practical and resjionsible duties. As he advanced in years his efforts 
Mere given more and more largely to the acti\e work of cul- 
tivating the fields and then he made arrangements for having a home 
of his own by his marriage in February, 1875, to JNIiss Anna Fogel- 
son. ^\■ll() was liorn in ]Maryland, where she was reared to the age of 



272 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

seventeen years, when she accompanied lier father, Henry Fogelson, 
to Uhnois iijjon his removal with his family to this state. 

For five years after his marriage JNIr. Parish engaged in farming 
on a part of his father's land and afterward purchased an eighty-acre 
tract on which were fair improvements. Still later he made invest- 
ment in one hundred and thi'ee acres of land which he cultivated for 
several years, but eventually he sold that place and bought one 
himdred and sixty acres near by. His holdings include about thirty- 
five acres of timl)ered i)asture land. He has remodeled the home and 
barn and now has a well improved farm on which he is engaged in 
raising and feeding stock for the market, while at the same time he 
carefully cultivates the cro])s best adapted to soil and climate. He 
was one of the promoters of the La Fayette Fair Association and iv 
still one of its stockholders. 

To iNIr. and ^Nlrs. Parish have been born foiu' children, of whom 
two are living. Everett, Avho is married and has one daughter, is 
engaged in farming in Goshen township. ]May is the wife of Jesse 
Frail, a farmer of Goshen township, and thev have a son, ]Miles 
Clyde. 

]Mr. Parish exercises his right of franchise in support of the men 
and measures of the republican party but his loyalty therto is never 
the outcome of a desire for public office. However, for some years he 
Avas a member of the school board and he has ever been interested in 
affairs that have to do with public improvement and civic advance- 
ment. He belongs to the jNIodern Woodmen camp at Toulon and both 
he and his wife are connected with the Royal Neighbors. They now 
have a wide ac(]uaintance in Toulon and this part of the county and 
the warm friendship of many is freely accorded them. For more 
than a half century ]Mr. Parish has been a Avitness of the events which 
have marked the history of Stark county and throughout almost the 
entire period he has been closely associated with the agricultural 
development of this part of the state. 



ALBERT W. KING. 



Albert W. King gained financial independence through his well 
managed business affairs and is now living retired in Wyoming. He 
was born in Washington Courthouse, Fayette county. Ohio, on the 
2d of November, 184fi, a son of Weslev King, whose birth occurred 



HISTORY OF STAllK COUNTY 273 

in ^Maryland on the 18th of August, 1821. The paternal grand- 
parents were John and Rachel (Hixon) King, natives of Virginia, 
who removed to Ohio at an early day in the history of that state. John 
King was a Methodist minister and three of his sons followed in his 
footsteps. 

"Wesley King was reared in the ]iuekeye state and devoted the 
greater part of his life to agricultm-al pursuits. He removed to Stark 
county, Illinois, in 1856 and jiurchased three hundred and twenty 
acres of good land in Valley township. Four years later, when it was 
thought that a railroad was going to be built through \Vyoniing, he 
established a furnitiu'e store there. But the road was not constructed 
and two years later he sold that l)usiness and bought a farm two miles 
northeast of Wyoming, which he operated until his demise in 1887 at 
the age of sixty-six years. He was very prominent in the work of the 
IMethodist Kpiscojjal church, and in early days his home in Valley 
toAvnsbip was a stopping place for the JNIethodist circuit riders. His 
political allegiance was given to the republican partj% and he held 
a number of local offices, including that of member of the school board. 
He was married on the 11th of November, 1841, to Miss Elizabeth 
Bro^\•n, a native of Virginia and a daughter of Peter and Kliza 
(Bateman) Brown. She reached the advanced age of eighty- four 
years; her mother died at the venerable age of ninety-four years; and 
her grandmother lived to be one hundred and three years old. By 
her man-iage she became the mother of eleven children, of whom two 
died in infancy. Six are still living, namely: Celenia, the wife of 
Thomas C. Hepperly, of Lentz, Oregon; Albert W. ; Peter, who 
resides in ^Missouri but was for forty years a resident of Kansas; 
J. E., M'ho is farming in Stark county; Elizabeth A., the wife of 
W. R. Ter])ening, of ^Missouri; and IMrs. A. H. Pettit, of Los An- 
geles, California. John died in Holt county, INIissouri, in 1909. INIrs. 
Alice Clark i)assed away in Burlington, Kansas. Isaiah died in 
Stark county, Illinois, in 1913. 

Alliert ^V. King was about ten years of age when the family re- 
moved to Stark county, Illinois, and here he grew to manhood. He 
attended the village schools of Wyoming for some time but being 
the eldest son in the family and his father needing help in the opera- 
tion of the farm, he put aside his school l)ooks at a comparatively early 
age and assisted his father imtil he was twenty years old. He theii 
went to Independence, jMissoiu'i, and worked in a store owned by his 
uncle for a year, after which he retvu-ned to Wyoming and entered the 
emi)loy of Scott & Wrigley. A year later he and Captain Otman 
pui-chascd the business formerly conducted by Scott & Wrigley and 



274 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

for five years this association was maintained. In IST-l, howeve]-, 
our subject became sole owner of a business but in 1879 admitted his 
brother, J. E. King, to a partnership and tlie firm became King 
Brothers. They continued in business for twenty-five years and for 
fifteen years tlie volume of their trade exceeded that of any other 
firm in Stark county. In 1899 they sold out and since then jNIr. King 
of this review has not been active in business. His success Mas due to 
his (juickness to recognize and take advantage of opportunities for 
expansion and for improving the service which lie rendered his 
patrons, to his integrity and to his strong common sense — qualities 
which are always at a premium in the commercial and financial world. 
He owns three hundred and twenty acres of land in Penn to\\nship — 
th.e old family homestead — and is recognized as one of the substantial 
citizens of his conmumity. 

Jslr. King was married in 1873 to Miss Mattie Stone, a native of 
Ohio and a daughter of Samuel S. Stone, Avho settled in Henry 
county, Illinois, before the Civil war. Mrs. King taught school pre- 
vious to her marriage. She has become the mother of three children : 
Fred S., a merchant of Preston. Iowa, who is married and has two 
children, Lawrence Schmidt King and Ferris Albert King: Xina L., 
the wife of Dr. C. C. Falk, of Eureka, California ; and Albert AV.. who 
died when in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. King also reared a niece of Mrs. 
King, Julia Iconise Stone, who, hoAvever, was always known as Louise 
Stone King imtil her marriage to Dr. W. H. Holmes of Pomona, 
California. Her mother died when she was an infant. 

]Mr. King has been prominent in public affairs for years and 
before the ijicor})oration of Wyoming was pi-esident of the village 
board for two years and has since served many times as a member of 
the city council. He has brought the same sound judgment and in- 
sight to bear upon the solution of numicipal problems that enabled 
him to successfully carry out his business enterprises and there has 
never been any question as to his devotion to the pulilic welfare. For 
twenty-two years he was an officer in the Central Agricidtural 
Society, realizing the close relation that exists between the prosperity 
of the farmers of the county and the development of the towns \\hich 
are the trade centers for the county. He belongs to the JMasonic 
lodge and cha])ter at Wyoming, to the conimandery at Kewanee and 
has served three different times as master of the lodge and for twenty- 
three years has been its secretary, this record proving the high esteem 
in which he is held by his fraternal bretlu-en. For forty years both 
he and his wife liave belonged to the Order of the Eastern Star. Since 
retiring from business life he has found many other interests to 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 275 

occupy his leisure, and he and his wife both enjoy the months which 
they sjiend in California, going there frequently to visit their 
daughters. 



GRANT DEXTER. 



Grant Dexter is one of the prosperous farmers and stock breeders 
and dealers of Goshen township. His home on section 4 is known as 
the Cloverdale Farm and comprises three hundred acres of rich and 
arable land, on which he raises Hereford cattle. He is a native son 
of Stark county, born January 27, 18().3, and he represents an old 
New England family. His father, George F. Dexter, was born in 
Bangor, JNlaine, January 11, 1832, and there reached adult age, after 
which he came with his parents to Illinois, the family home being 
established in Elmira township, where they were among the pioneer 
settlers. With the woi-k of early development and improvement here 
they were closely associated. George F. Dexter was married in this 
county to ^liss Laura ^Miner, wlu) was the tirst white female child born 
in Stark county. Following his marriage 31 r. Dexter purchased land 
whereon he now resides, his first tract comprising forty acres. He at 
once began to develop and impi-ove the place and as his financial re- 
sources increased he extended its boundaries from time to time, becom- 
ing in the course of years one of the prosperous farmers of Goshen 
township. He erected a pleasant residence and provided shelter for 
grain and stock by building good barns and sheds. In 1889 he was 
called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who passed away on the 
27th of Ajjril of that year, since which time Mr. Dexter has made his 
home Avith his son Grant, who is the eldest in a family of three sons. 

The usual experiences of the farm bred boy came to Grant Dex- 
ter in the period of his youth. He attended the district schools and 
from the time of early s])ring planting until crops Avere harvested 
in the late autumn worked in tlie fields. Eventually he relieved his 
father of the care and development of the home farm by assuming its 
management and control. At the time of his marriage "he brought his 
])ride to the old homestead. The residence has since been remodeled 
and is now a thoroughly modern and attractive home supplied with 
furnace heat, hot and cold water, bathroom, gas light and other 
modern conveniences. ]\Ir. Dexter has also added to his farm by the 
purchase of adjoining land on section 3. Goshen township, and in con- 
nection with the cultivation of the fields he is engaged in the breed- 



276 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

ing and sale of Herefore pure bred cattle. He was also one of the 
promoters of the Galva Cooperative State Bank, of which he became a 
director, and he was active in promoting the La Faj^ette Fair Associa- 
tion, of which he became a stockholder. 

On the 2nd of December, 1886, in Henry comity, Illinois, jNIr. 
Dexter was married to ^Nliss Emma F. Keim, who was born and 
reared in that county and who bj' her marriage has become the mother 
of four children: Fay. the wife of Frazer T. Winans, a resident 
farmer of Goshen townshi^j; Grace; Gladys; and Marvin G. 

In ])olitics Mr. Dexter has been a lifelong republican and keeps 
well informed on the questions and issues of the day but does not seek 
nor desire public office. He and his wife are both active workers in 
church and Sunday school. They belong to the Baptist church of 
Toulon and jMr. Dexter was made a member of the building com- 
mittee, having in charge the erection of the new church. He is never 
willing to make terms with anything underhanded but is straight- 
forward and honorable in all of his relations and has made his life a 
])otent force in jiromoting moral i^rogress and uplift in the conununity 
in which he has alwavs made his home. 



JOSEPH A. KIDD. 



Starting out in life as a farm hand, Joseph A. Kidd has gradually 
worked his way upward. From his earnings he saved the money 
which enabled him to purchase land, and he now has one of the tinest 
productive farms of Osceola township, his home being on section 18. 
He was born on the 17th of August, 1874, in Elmira township, his 
parents lieing James and Sarah (Gailey) Kidd, both of whom were 
natives of Ireland, the father's birth having occurred in County 
Antrim, and the mother's in County Derry. Coming to the new 
world they established their home in Stark county, Illinois, where 
their remaining days were jjassed, and upon the farm where they 
located they reared their family of five children : Elizabeth, the wife 
of W. H. Boardman, living in Elmira township; Thomas J., also a 
resident of the same township; Joseph A.; INIary, the wife of M. H. 
liondenburg, of Canova, South Dakota; and James, also residing 
in Elmira township. They also lost two children in infancy. 

Joseph A. Kidd pursued his education in the Osceola Grove 
school, dividing his time between the duties of the schoolroom, the 
pleasures of the plaj'ground and the work of the fields. He con- 




Ml!. AM) MRS. .lOSKPH A. KIDD 



LlBRARV 
QF THE 

mmfw OF iLUNOi 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 279 

tinned at home with his parents until he reached the age of eighteen 
years, when he started out in life on his own account, working by 
the month as a farm hand for seven years. He was ambitious to 
engage in business for himself and during that period he saved his 
earnings until he felt justiiied, through ex])erience and by reason of 
his capability, in renting land which he cultivated for six years. 
Further economy and industry enabled him diu'ing that period to 
save the sum wherewith he purchased his farm on section 18, Osceola 
township. Here he has one hundred and seventy-five acres, in addi- 
tion to which he owns eighty acres in Elmira township. He culti- 
vates all of this land himself and is quite extensively engaged in 
feeding stock. He has put up most of the buildings upon the place, 
ei'ecting an excellent barn and sheds, while in 1913 he built his present 
residence, which is thoroughly modern, equipped with electric lights, 
and sup2)lied with all the latest conveniences and comforts. His 
place is known as Glen View Farm, and the success of his stock 
feeding interests is indicated in the fact that he ships from two to 
four carloads of cattle and hogs annually. 

AVhen twenty-five years of age INlr. Kidd was married to Miss 
Lizzie ]Murray, and thej' have three children : Margaret Isabel ; Dale 
Thomas; and James William. JNIr. Kidd has always given his polit- 
ical support to the republican party where national questions and 
issues are invohed, but casts an independent l)allot at county elec- 
tions. He has served as school director and is interested in the edu- 
cational progress of the community. Fraternallj^ he is connected 
with the Modern Woodmen camp at Osceola, and religiously with 
the United Presbyterian church of Elmira. His life is actuated by 
high and honorable principles, and his practical and progressive 
efforts have been attended with successful results, which place him 
among the substantial stock raisers and agriculturists of the state. 



JOHN ALLEN. 



.Tolm Allen, residing on section 31. Toulon township, is a thrifty 
and iirogressive farmer, stock raiser and feeder who owns and culti- 
vates a tract of two hundred and forty acres of land constituting (me of 
the Avell improved farm properties of the county, situated just south of 
Toulon. Mr. Allen was born in Fulton county, Illinois. ]Mav 22, 1864, 
a son of William Allen, who Avas born in County Tipperary, Ireland, 
wliere he was reared to the age of eighteen years. He then came to 



Vol. TI— 14 



280 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

the new world and for a time resided in New York state. Subse- 
quently. he came west to Illinois and established his home in Kane 
county. He was married in St. Charles, Illinois, to Maggie Broderick, 
also a native of the green isle of Krin, whence she came to the United 
States in 1840. Mr. Allen removed from Kane to Fulton county and 
still later came to Stark county, where he turned his attention to farm- 
ing but later engaged in buying and shipping stock, including cattle, 
horses and hogs. He became a well-known dealer and shipper and 
won success through tlie careful management of his interests. He 
silent his last years in Toulon, where he died December .5, 1904. at the 
age of about seventy years. 

John Allen Avas a lad of but foiu- summers when brought to Stark 
county, where he was reared upon the old homestead farm, the pulilic 
school system affording him the educational opjiortunities that he 
enjoyed, although he is largely a self-educated man, adding much to 
his knowledge through reading and observation as well as through 
practical experience since attaining his majority. In early manhood 
he rented land and thus engaged in farming for a number of years. 
After his marriage he rented land in Henry county for six years, and 
while residing there he made purchase of his first eighty acres in Stark 
county. He also purchased a half interest in a meat market and 
butchering business in Toulon, of which he had cliarge for two 
years, after which he disj^osed of that business. He carefully saved 
his earnings and in the sjiring of 1905 purchased an eighty-acre tract 
whereon he now resides, on section 31, Toulon township, a mile south 
of the city of Toulon. With cliaracteristic energy he began its further 
development and improvement and lie now occupies there a comfort- 
able residence in the rear of which stand good barns and other out- 
buildings, and these in turn are surrounded by liighly cultivated fields. 
He has pvn-chased more land as opportunity lias offered and is now the 
owner of a farm of two hundred and forty acres. ]Mr. Allen makes 
a business of raising and feeding cattle and hogs for the market and 
fattens and ships from two to three carloads of hogs and one or more 
car loads of cattle each year. 

On tlie lOtli of February, 1896, INIr. Allen was united in marriage 
to JMiss Alice Brady, who was born and reared in this county and for 
four years was a successful teacher. By this marriage there liave been 
born two sons and two daughters, Henry, IMargaret and Paulina, all 
students in the townshi]i high school at Toulon, and William, who is 
attending the country school. 

Mr. and ]Mrs. Allen were reared in the Catholic faith, to which 
tliev still adhere, and IMr. Allen is identified with the INIodern Wood- 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 281 

men and the INIystic Workers, both of which are fraternal insurance 
societies. He is a self-made man and deserves much credit for ^diat 
lie has accomplished, for he started out in life empty handed and by 
persistency of purpose and indefatigable energy has worked his way 
ujjward. His life has been a very busy and useful one and his success 
is the i)roof of his industry, determination and capability. 



WOOD C. DEXTER. 



e 



An alert and wide-awake farmer is Wood C. Dexter, mIio is living 
on the old homestead farm of one hundred acres on section 4, Goshen 
township. His birth occurred in Toulon township on the 24th of 
Xovember. 1874, his father being James Dexter, who was born near 
Bangor, ^Nlaine, and who came to Illinois with his father, I.olan 
Dexter, who settled in Stark county. James Dexter was married here 
to Ehzabeth Johnson, a daughter of P. P. Johnson, one of the ])ioneer 
settlers of Stark county. Following his marriage James Dexter 
began the cultivation of his father's farm and then made purchase of 
what has since been known as the Dexter homestead. This he devel- 
oped and improved, erecting thereon a good residence and substantial 
barns and outbuildings. He was an active and industrious citizen and 
a ])ros])erous farmer who carefully, systematically and successfully 
cultivated his land until 1881, when he rented the place and removed 
to Galva, where for more than a third of a century he has now li\ed 
retired, enjoying the fruits of his former toil in well earned lest. 

Wood C. Dexter is one of a family of four sons and t«o daugh- 
ters. He remained under the parental roof until he went away to 
school, supplementing his early educational training, received in the 
district schools of Goshen township, by study in the schools of Galva. 
In 1903 he returned to the farm and has since been enaaoed in aari- 
cultm-al i)ursuits, giving his attention to general farm work and to 
stock raising. He also does some dairying, milking a munber of cows 
and selling the cream. His work is carefully managed, system char- 
acterizing everything that he does, so that there is no loss of time, 
labor nor material. 

On the 9th of ^larch, 190.). Mr. Dexter was united in marriage, 
in Galva, to ]Miss Effie Johnson, who was born, reared and educated 
in Galesburg, Illinois, and formerly engaged in teaching in the schools 
of this state and also in Kansas. Mr. and IMrs. Dexter have a family 
of five children, namely: James, Howard, Gertrude. Carl and Keith. 



282 HISTORV OF STAKK COUNTY 

Uotli 3Ir. luul ^h's. Dexter are members of the Galva Baptist church 
and their lives measure vip to high standards, being characterized by 
good deeds, noble purposes and fidelity to duty in every relation. 



EMERY L. HALSTED. 

Emery L. Halsted, a representative farmer of Toulon township, 
living on section .33, is well known not only as the owner of a highly 
improved tract of excellent land but also as a breeder of Clydes- 
dale horses, and a stock feeder. His life record l)egan in JNIarshall 
county. Illinois, on the 19th of JMarch, 1881. His father. Nelson 
Halsted, was a business man of that county and was there married 
and i-eared his family. For years he was proprietor of a meat market 
and butchering business but he passed away in 1881. His widow sur- 
vived him for more than two decades, her death occurring on the 9th 
of February, 1903. 

Emery L. Halsted was reared in ^larshall and Stark counties and 
is indebted to the public school system of the state for the educational 
opportunities which he enjoyed. He is, however, largely self-educated 
and has gained many valuable lessons in the school of experience 
and from reading and observation. He lost his own father during 
infancy and from the age of foiu'teen years has been tlependen.t 
ujjon his own resources. He worked for several years by the month 
as a farm hand for his stepfather but was ambitious to engage in 
business on his own account and utilized every opportunity that led to 
that end. He was married in Wyoming, November 9, 1904, to Miss 
Di'usilla C. Cox, who was born and reared in Stark county and 
is a daughter of the late JSIonroe Cox, who was a well known citi- 
zen here. Mv. Halsted and his brother rented land which they farmed 
in partnershi]) for five years and eventually E. E. Halsted took up 
his abode in ^Vyoming, where he engaged in clerking for a time and 
also did other work that came to hand. He afterward purchased the 
fai-m whereon he now resides, becoming owner of a one hundred and 
six acre tract of land adjoining another eighty-acre tract which his 
wife inherited, making their farm one of two hundred and forty 
acres of well improved land. He keeps everything about the ])lace in 
good repair, has erected substantial outbuildings to protect stock, 
grain and farm machinery from inclement weather and has fenced 
his land, dividing it into fields of convenient size. In addition to 
cultivating the cereals best adapted to soil and climate he is engaged in 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 283 



raising and feeding stock for the market and annually ships one or 
more car loads of fat hogs and a car load of fat steers each year. He 
is also a well known breeder and dealer in standard bred Clytlesdale 
horses. His business afi'airs are capably managed and enterprise and 
discrimination have brought him growing success. 

]Mr. and JNIrs. Halsted have a daughter, Clara, now a student in 
the township high school at Toulon. In politics Mr. Halsted main- 
tains an independent course, nor has he ever been ambitious for office. 
He belongs to the Odd Fellows lodge at Toulon and his wife is con- 
nected with the Rebekah degree. jNIuch of his life has been spent in 
Stark county, so that his history is largely familiar to his fellow towns- 
men, who feel that he has fully won the success which is his and who 
name him with the jjrogressive farmers and stock raisers of the 
county. 



DUNCAN M. MARSHALL. 

Actuated by the spirit of progress and advancement in all that he 
does. Duncan ]M. ^larshall has proven his right to rank with the repre- 
sentative and leading farmers of Goshen township, where he t)wns two 
hundred and twenty acres of arable land on section 2. While he has 
been a resident of Stark county for only a brief period, having arrived 
here in 1912, he has won recognition as a substantial and representative 
citizen. 

His birth occurred in INIarshall county, West Virginia, April 11, 
1879, and he was educated in the public schools. When a young man 
he removed westward to Illinois in 1901, settling in Henry county, 
whei-e he worked by the month as a farm hand for a number of years, 
thereby gaining his financial start. He afterward purchased a team 
and turned his attention to the business of teaming in Kewanee, where 
he sjient two years. Still later he removed to Bureau county, where 
he cultivated a rented farm for two years and then returned to Henry 
county, where he coutinued to rent land for six years. In 1912 he 
iiiade ])urcliase of the farm whereon he now resides and in the inter- 
vening period he has concentrated his efforts and attention upon the 
further development and improvement of the place. He has fenced 
the fields, repaired the buildings and erected a large silo at a cost of 
six hundred dollars. Among the other improvements that he has 
added are a hog house, a good cement tank, a cattle shed and a 
hay barn. He is very energetic, his life being characterized by unre- 
mitting diligence and industry, and within the short space of four 



2Si HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

j^ears he has wrought a marvelous change in the appearance of his 
place. In addition to tilling the soil in the production of crops he 
raises and feeds stock, and is also now engaged in breeding shorthorn 
cattle and other pure-blooded registered stock, thereby adding mate- 
rially to his income. 

On the 1st of :March. 19()4, in Kewanee, ]Mr. ^Marshall was united 
in marriage to ]Miss ]Martha Clark, who was born and reared in Ashe- 
ville, North Carolina, and in young womanliood joined an uncle in 
Kewanee. ^Nlr. and ]Mrs. ^Marshall have three living children, Harry, 
Ward and Helen. They lost their first born. Hazel who died at the 
age of two and one-half years. Mv. 3Iarshall is a very energetic 
young man, his life being characteristic of the spirit of enterprise 
"which has typified the development of the Mississippi valley. 



NATHAN CORRINGTON. 

Nathan Corrington devotes his time to the operation of his farm of 
one hundred and sixty acres on section 24, Penn township, and is 
meeting with gratifying success as an agriculturist. His birth 
occurred in Peoria, lUinois, on the loth of November, 1883, and he is 
a son of Frank V. and Lucy (Giles) Corrington. both of whom were 
born and reared in the vicinity of Peoria. The father engaged in 
farming there and both passed away in that locality. 

Nathan Corrington was reared under the parental roof and 
received a good common school education, but when eighteen years of 
age began farming on his OAvn account. Later he worked for a year 
and a half at the plumber's trade, after which he again turned his 
attention to agricultural pursuits. He remained in Peoria county 
until 1914. when he came to Stark county and purchased his present 
farm of one hvmdred and sixty acres on section 24. Penn township. 
The i)lace Avas formerly owned by his father. The residence is up-to- 
date and well designed. He raises grain and stock and derives a good 
financial retin-n from his labor. 

In 1913 ]Mr. Corrington was united in marriage to Miss Daisy 
Dean Vogel. v.lio was lioni in Peoria county. They have a son, Giles 
Russell. 

Mr. Corrington is independent in politics, voting for the man 
rather than the party, and he attends the IMethodist Episcopal church 
at Bradford, to which his wife belongs. He is well known in Masonic 
circles as he is identified A\ith the lodge, chapter, commandery and 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 285 

shrine, all at Peoria. He is a young man but has already attained a 
measure of j^rosperity that would be creditable to a man several years 
his senior. He is not only a prosperous farmer but is also a public- 
spirited citizen and is willing to aid in securing the advancement of his 
community. 



OTIS HODGES. 



Otis Hodges, who holds the title to the ]Ma2)le Ridge Farm com- 
prising three hundred and twenty acres of land on section 1, Penn 
township, was born in Valley township, Stark county, on the 21st of 
November, 1860, of the marriage of David and Nanc}' (Hutchinson) 
Hodges. The father, who was born in England, came to the United 
States when only thirteen years of age and located in Saratoga, New 
York. He remained there for nineteen years but at the end of that 
time, in 18.51, removed to Stark county, Illinois. He purchased land 
here, which he operated for two years, and then returned to New 
York state. At length, however, he came again to Stark county and 
his remaining days were passed upon the home farm here. He was 
a fine business man. and as the years passed and his resources increased 
he invested in additional land, becoming in time the owner of eight 
or nine liundred acres. His wife survives and still lives in Valley 
township. 

Otis Hodges entered the ]niblic schools at the usual age and ac- 
<juired a good education. .After jjutting aside his textbooks he assisted' 
his fathei' on the farm until he was twenty-eight years of age, when 
he ])urchased land in Peoria countv. He farmed there for a long 
])cri()d but in 1909 removed to his jjresent farm, which comprises three 
himdred and twenty acres and is situated on section 1. Penn town- 
ship. Ten acres of the land is in timber in Peoria county but all of 
tlie i-est is under cultivation and aside from his home fai-m he o])ei-ates 
an additional fifty-six acres. The place is known as the Maple Ridge 
Farm and is well improved and thoroughly modern in its equip- 
ment. He raises the cro])s best adapted to soil and climate and also 
feeds some stock, especially hogs. As the years have passed he has 
])rosiiei-cd financially and is now in excellent circumstances. 

On the 11th of Sei)teml)er. 1889, occurred the marriage of Mr. 
Hodges and Miss Elizabeth Graham, who was born in Scotland. 
They have become the parents of the following children: Sherman, 
wlio is living in Bradford, Illinois; Agnes, who is the wife of Mart 



286 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

Deyo, of Osceola townshii); Raymond, who married Elsie Drawyer 
and who is assisting his father; and Robert, Alma, Jesse, John and 
Edwin all at home. 

JNIr. Hodges casts his ballot in support of the candidates and 
measures of the republican party and for two terms served as road 
commissioner in Akron township, Peoria county. Fraternally he is 
identitied with the ]Maccabees. He attends the Methodist Protestant 
church, to which some of the family belong, and his influence is always 
given on the side of righteousness and justice. 



JOHN T. FOX. 



Although John T. Fox has given over to others the active \vork 
of the fields he still resides upon his three hundred and fifty acre 
farm on section 35, Essex township, and supervises its operation. He 
was born in Fairfield county, Ohio, on the 7th of January, 1847, a son 
of Abraham Fox, who was a native of Pennsylvania, and removed to 
Ohio in young manhood. The father learned the weaver's trade in 
his youth and became a skilled artisan. He was married in the Ruck- 
eye state to Miss Jane Sampson, who was also born in Pennsylvania 
but was brought to Ohio by her parents as a child. She and her hus- 
band both passed away in the Buckeye state. 

John T. Fox was reared in his native state and secured a good 
education in the public schools. In 1864, when seventeen years of 
age, he enlisted at Circleville, Ohio, in Company A, Thirty-eighth 
Oliio Volunteer Infantry, with wliich he remained for a year. He was 
with Sherman on the march to the sea and remained at the front until 
the close of the war but saw no hard fighting. He participated in tlie 
grand review at Washington D. C, and was mustered out of service 
in July, 1865, at Louisville, Kentucky, after being with the army for 
ten months. 

After his return from the front Mr. Fox purchased a tract of 
land in Ohio and engaged in farming there until 1876, when he re- 
moved to Shelby county, Illinois. Two years later he came to Stark 
county, arriving here in Decemlier. He purchased eighty acres in 
Essex township and has since resided upon that place. The residence 
was standing at the time that the farm came into his possession but 
he has erected all of the other buildings, which are commodious and 
well adapted to their purpose. He has met witli gratifying success 
in his farming operations and has invested in additional land from 




IIK. AXU MRS. .UlHX T. 1-()X 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

JJNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 289 

time to time, his holdings now comprising three hundred and fifty 
acres. He is not actively engaged in the oiJeration of his farm hut 
su])ervises the work of others. 

3Ir. Fox was married in 18G8 to JMiss Elizaheth Weber, who was 
also born in Ohio. Her father, ^Michael Weber, devoted his life to 
farming and passed away in the Buckeye state. JNIr. and Mrs. Yox 
are the parents of ten children, namely: Lillie, the wife of C. B. 
Strayer, of Toulon; Clara, who married F. L. Gelvin, a farmer of 
West Jersey township; Emma, the wife of E. A. Graves, a resident of 
^Minnesota; Alice, who married John E. Siders, of Perry, Iowa; 
Elmer H., who is farming near Perry in Boone county, Iowa; Effie, 
who married AV. C. Kamerer, of West Jersey township; Harriet, the 
wife of E. C. Gingrich, of Essex township; Arthur, who is married 
and is ojierating his father's farm ; Bertha, a twin of Arthur and the' 
wife of Will Addis, of Huron, South Dakoto; and Myrtle, who 
mari'ied Samuel I^arge. a farmer of Essex township. 

31 r. Fox is a republican in his political allegiance and has served 
for four years as township assessor, making an excellent record in that 
cajiacity. Through his association with the Grand Army of the 
Re])ublic he keeps in touch with other veterans of the Civil war and 
in times of 2)eace he has proved as loyal to the common good as he 
did M'hen as a boy he entered the Federal army. He has gained a Avide 
acquaintance diu'ing the thirty-eight years of his residence in this 
countj', and those who have been most closely associated with him are 
liis stanchest friends. 



COURTNEY D. FOWLER. 

Courtney D. Fowler, operating a farm of four hundred and 
seventy acres on section 4, Toulon township, is one of the wide-awake, 
alert and enterprising agriculturists and stock raisers of this part of 
the state. He Avas born December 11, 1874., on the old homestead 
farm which he still occupies. His father, John Fowler, was a native 
of Pennsylvania, born in Elmira, October 31, 1833. The paternal 
grandfather, Brady Fowler, removed with his family from Pennsyl- 
vania to Illinois, making a permanent location in Stark county in 
1836. so that he was numbered among its oldest pioneer settlers. He 
arrived there only four years after the Black Hawk war had ended 
Indian supremacy in Illinois. He preempted or purchased three 
liundred acres of land which was entirely wild and unimproved and at 



290 HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 

once he began to break the sod and till the soil. He s\)\\t rails and 
fenced the farm and in the course of time transformed his land into 
very productive fields. 

John Fowler was reared upon tlie old homestead and in this count}' 
married Sarah E. Xorris, who was born in Tazewell county. Illinois. 
He took up the task of further improving the old home place, erected 
a large and pleasant farm residence, also built a good barn and planted 
a fine grove of pine, cedars, spruces and forest trees. This constitutes 
a great protection against storms from the west and northwest, for the 
trees are now large and their broad branches shut out the winds. For 
a long jieriod he was numbered among the active and prosperous farm- 
er's of Stark county and his holdings comprised two or more tracts of 
very productive land. He was also one of the public-spirited citizens 
of the county and served as supervisor and in other official positions 
of honor and trust. He held membership in the Elmira Presbyterian 
church and for some years was a member of its choir. He guided his 
life according to the teachings of the church and throughout the com- 
munity was known as a consistent Christian gentleman whose death, 
which occiu-red April .5, 101 -t, \\as deei)ly regretted by all. His wife 
survives him and now resides in Toulon. 

Courtney D. Fowler was one of a family of two sons and two 
daughters and was reared on the old family homestead, acquiring his 
primary education in the jiulilic schools near by and in the Toulon high 
school. He remained with his father on the old home place until he at- 
tained his majority and afterward began farming on his own account. 
On the 3d of October, 1910, in Tovdon, was celebrated his marriage to 
JNIiss Jennie JM. Pierson, who was born in West Jersey township, this 
county, a daughter of W. H. Pierson. For three years Mr. Fowler 
was off' the farm, during which time he was engaged in the hardware 
business in Toulon, but at the end of that time disposed of his interest 
in the store and in 1911 returned to the farm, upon which he has made 
many modern imjorovements, keeping everything in touch with the 
most scientific methods of carrying on agricultural pursuits. He has 
a large, powerful traction engine, with which he oj)erates a gang of 
eight fourteen-inch plows, thereby saving much horse power and time. 
He has other modern farm machinery and implements and in fact 
there is no feature of progressive farming at the present time that is 
lacking upon his place. 

To ]Mr. and IMrs. Fowler have been born two children, Ruth and 
Jean. The mother is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of 
Toulon. Avhile ]Mr. Fowler belongs to the Elmira Presbyterian clnu'ch. 
Roth are held in the highest esteem, their manv excellent traits of heart 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 291 

and mind gaining for them the confidence and goodwill of all with 
whom they have been brought in contact. Mr. Fowler's labors largely 
set the standard for others and his well directed bnsiness ability is 
bringing him snccess, while his course proves what can be accomplished 
bv determination and honorable eft'ort. 



TIRUS T. KELLY. 



Tirus T. Kelly, an enterprising and jjrogressive farmer and stock 
raiser is operating the ^Manxman Farm, consisting of two himdred 
and forty acres on section 8, Goshen township. He has been a life- 
long resident of Illinois, his birth having occurred in Henry county, 
April 2. 1889. His father, Thomas Kelly, was born inider the Brit- 
ish flag, on the Isle of JMan, and there passed his boyhood and youth, 
coming to the new world Avith his mother in 1874, following the death 
of the husband and father. INIrs. Kelly located in Henry county. 
Illinois, where she joined her older son. Thomas Kelly afterward 
purchased land and improved a farm in ^^'elk■r township, that county. 
He there engaged in general agricultural pursuits for a number of 
years, when he sold that property and jnu'chased the farm in Goshen 
township, Stark county, upon which son his Thomas now resides. He 
called it tlie ^Manxman Farm after an old estate on the Isle of JNIan. 
He bent his energies to the further development and improvement of 
that pi-operty, rebuilt and remodeled the house, also erected barns and 
outbuildings, and was regarded as one of the most energetic and enter- 
prising farmers, stock raisers and feeders of the locality. He 
continued upon that farm until 1910, wlien he removed to Galva, 
where he now lives retired. While a resident of Henry county he 
was united in marriage to Mrs. Jane Kewish, wiio also was born and 
reared on the Isle of ]Man. When she crossed the Atlantic she. too, 
became a resident of Henry county, Illinois, and there she gave her 
hand in marriage to Robert Kewish, who was also a native of the Isle 
of jNIan and after coming to the new world followed farming in 
Henry county until his death. His widow afterward became the wife 
of Thomas Kelly and they are now highly esteemed citizens of Galva, 
where they hold membership in the Presbyterian church. Mr. Kelly 
is also a member of the Odd Fellows lodge there, in which he has tilled 
all of the offices and is a past grand. 

Tirus T. Kelly was reared under the parental roof in Henry v.wd 
J-'t-ivk counties and was educated in the schools of Galva and of La 



292 HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 

Fayette. He continued to assist liis father with the farm work until 
the latter removed to Galva, at which time Tirus T. Kelly took charge 
of the home place and is now busily engaged in the further cultivatio)i 
of the Manxman Farm of two hundred and forty acres. He raises 
good crops and in connection therewith is engaged in raising and feed- 
ing stock. He is also engaged in breeding Duroc-Jersey hogs and 
Shropshire sheep, and his live stock interests constitute an important 
and profitable branch of his business. 

To the home farm ]Mr. Kelly brought his bride following his mar- 
riage in La Fayette, Illinois, on the 6th of April, 1910, when Miss 
Pearl White became his Avife. She is a daughter of Abel H. ^^^hite, 
of La Fayette, was born and reared there and was graduated from 
the high school. By her marriage she has become the mother of a 
daughter and son, Bernice and Russell T. 

jNlr. and jMrs. Kelly are members of the INIethodist Episcopal 
church of La Fayette, and Mr. Kelly affiliates with the Masonic lodge 
there, exemplifying in his life the beneficient sprit upon which the 
craft has been established. He is also identified with the repul)lican 
jjarty but never has been an office seeker. That he is interested in the 
cause of education is indicated by his four years' service on the school 
board and his active efforts to promote public school interests in liis 
locality. In a word, his influence is always on the side of advancement 
and improvement. He stands for all those things which featiu-e most 
largely in promoting the civic welfare, and at the same time he finds 
ample opportunity to carefully and successfuly manage his business 
affairs, Avhich are now bringing to him substantial and well merited 
success. 



.1. W. MAHLER. 



J. W. INIahler, a practical and efficient farmer of Penn townshi]:) 
was born a half a mile south of his present farm on the 2d of Decem- 
ber, 1860. His parents, John Edward and Elizabeth (Hamilton) 
INIahler, Avere born in Hanover, Germany, and in Pennsylvania, 
respectively, the latter being of English and German extraction. 
When eighteen years of age the father came to the United States and 
settled in Stark county, Illinois. He became the owner of land in 
Penn townsliip and concentrated his energies upon its cultivation for 
many years but at length removed to Wyoming. He was a self-made 
man and through his energy and good judgment became the owner of 



HISTOHV OF STARK COUXTV 2U3 

fi\e Imndred and sixty acres of valuable land. He reached the 
advanced age of ninety-one years and is survived l)y his wife who is 
still living in Wyoming. 

J. W. Mahler entered the public schools at the usual age and 
completed the course offered there but during his boyhood and youth 
also assisted his father with the farm Avork. He remained upon the 
home place until he was twenty years old, when he took up his resi- 
dence on section 23, Penn township. His home farm comprises a 
quarter section, and he also owns one hundred and sixty acres in 
Cheyenne county, Nebraska. He has made all the improvements 
u])on his i^lace, which com])arc favorably with those found on neigh- 
boring farms, and 'in the management of his affairs he is progressive 
and businesslike. He engages in general farming and has gained a 
gratifying measure of prosperity. 

]Mr. jNIahler was united in marriage in 1880 to INIiss Hannah ^Nlaria 
Fonts, and to them were born two children: Charles, who died in 
infancy, and Hose M., the wife of James Sliver, a farmer of Stark 
county. 

]Mr. Mahler votes the republican ticket and for twenty-seven con- 
secutive years has held the ofHce of school director, his services in that 
connection having been highly satisfactory to his constituents. He 
belongs to the JModern ^Voodmen of America at Campgrove and has 
many friends within and without that organization. 



JOHN E. O'NEILL. 



John E. O'Neill, who has gained a gratifying measure of success 
as a farmer and stock raiser in Penn township, was born in County 
Cavan, Ireland, on the •28th of August, 1871, a son of Terrence and 
Catherine (Leddy) O'Neill, also natives of that county. They 
resided in their native country until 1882, when they came to tlie 
L^nited States, sailing from Queenstown on the 1st of April. After 
reaching America they made their way westward to Wyoming, Stark, 
county, Illinois, where tliey arrived on the 22(1 of April. They located 
upon a farm and the father devoted his time to its operation until his 
death, which occurred on the 22d of Jiuie. 1012. The mf)ther survives 
and is still living at Wyoming. 

John E. O'Neill began his education in Ireland but continued his 
studies in the public schools of Toulon after the removal of the family 
to this countrv. On starting out to make his own way in the world 



294 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

he worked as a farm hand for ten dollars per month and was so 
employed for a decade. He then rented land for three years but at 
the end of that time was able to buy sixty acres on section 29, Penn 
township, for which he paid seventy-five dollars an acre. Subse- 
quently he bought another sixty acres from his father at one hundred 
and fifty dollars per acre, and in 191.5 he purchased eighty acres at 
two hundred dollars j^er acre. He has planted a fine grove u})()ii the 
farm, has erected good buildings and made other improvements upon 
the place, and in his work follows up-to-date methods. He feeds a 
large amount of stock annually and also engages in raising grain to 
some extent. 

On the 19th of February, 1908, ]Mr. O'Xeill was married to ]Miss 
JNIargaret Farber, by whom he has five children: Helen M.. John 
Edward. Frances J., JNIargaret Celestine and Catherine Celestia. 

^Ir. O'Xeill supports the democratic party at the polls and mani- 
fests the interest of the public-spirited citizen in the affairs of 
government although not an office seeker. He has, however, served 
for two years as school director. He is a communicant of the Roman 
Catholic church of Wyoming and contributes to the support of that 
organization. He has been very successful as a farmer and has also 
gained and held the warm friendship of many. 



FRED A. FULLER. 



Active among the energetic and farsight ed farmers of Goshen 
township is Fred A. Fuller, Avho lives on section 3 and who gives 
his undivided attention to the improvement of his farm, his labors 
being attended with excellent results. He was born in Henry county, 
this state, on the 27th of June. 1873, and his father. George W. Fuller, 
was also a native of that county, his l)irth having occurred in Wethers- 
field township, February 12, 1846. His paternal grandfather, Ansel 
Fuller, was reared amid pioneer conditions and environment upon the 
home farm in Stark county and afterward removed to Henry county, 
M'here he purchased land and opened up a fai-m, upon which his son, 
George W. Fuller, Avas born and reared and upon which he has since 
made his home. George Fuller was married in Henry county to Miss 
]Maggie E. Likes, who was born in Pennsylvania but was reared in 
Henry comity. Illinois, where her father. Samuel Likes, settled at a 
very early day. 

Fred A. Fuller was reared on the old homestead farm in Henry 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 295 

county, having the usual experiences that fall to the lot of the farm 
bred boy. Play and work divided his time, together with the task 
of acquiring a public school education, and when his textbooks were 
put aside he concentrated his efforts on the work of assisting his father 
in carrying on the home farm. After he had attained liis majority 
he rented land, which he cultivated for several years, and he also 
purchased a steam threslier and cornsheller, which he operated in 
Henry county for seven years, making that work an important branch 
of his business. He made his first purcliase of land in 1907, when he 
became the o\vner of eighty acres in Goshen township. This was blue 
grass pasture and the sod Iiad never been broken. He now has fifty 
acres under the plow, while the balance is meadow and pasture land. 
He lias erected a substantial and comfortable residence upon the place, 
has also put up good barns and sheds, and today has a well improved 
and valuable farm. In connection with the development of his place 
he raises and feeds stock, making a sj^ecialty of Duroc-Jersey hogs. 



J. S. GLEASON. 



J. S. Gleason, of Penn township, who now holds title to four 
himdred and forty acres of finely improved land, is a self-made man 
for he began his independent career without capital or without the 
aid of influential friends and has at all times been dependent upon 
his own resoui-ces for success. He was born in Dublin township, 
Cheshire county, New Hampshire, on the 10th of April, 183.5, the son 
of Phineas Gleason, Jr., and a grandson of Phhieas Gleason, Sr. The 
last named served throughout the Revolutionary war and was pro- 
moted to the rank of captain. The greater part of the fighting in 
^\hicli he took ])ai-t occurred in the vicinity of Lake Champlain. He 
reached an advanced age, dying when he was eighty-three years of 
age, and our subject remembers having seen him. The family is of 
English descent, the ancestors of the American liranch having resided 
at ^Manchester. Ijancashire. Phineas Gleason, Jr., spent the greater 
part of his life in the east but during his last days lived m itii our 
subject in Stark county, Illinois. His wife was in her maidenhood 
Miss Sarah Smith and she was born in Dublin, 'New Hampshire. 
They had nine children, of whom two came to Illinois, our subject 
and liis bi-other Charles. 

.1. S. Gleason was reared upon the home farm, in New Hampshire 
and received a high school education in that state. He remained there 



296 PIISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

until he was about twenty years of age, when in 18.55 he came to Stark 
county, Illinois, and located upon his present home farm on section 
1.5, Penn township. There was a small log house upon the place and 
he kept bachelor's hall there for about sixteen years. He placed his 
land under cultivation in a comparatively short time and as the years 
passed his resources increased although there were many difficulties 
to be encountered in those days which the modern farmer knows noth- 
ing of. Among other things it was difficult to market his crops and 
stock as the nearest railroad jjoint was Henry, Illinois, eighteen miles 
distant. He believes in the desirability of real estate as an investment 
and has purchased more land from time to time until he now owns 
four Innidred and forty acres, which is improved with fovir sets of 
buildings. He supervises the operation of all his land and derives 
therefrom a handsome income. 

JNIr. Gleason was married in 1870 to ]Miss Abbie S. Xims, by whom 
he has the following children: Albert ISl., who is operating one of 
his farms; Clora 31., the wife of Harry Adams, a farmer of Penn 
township: Delia, who married Ben Leadley, a resident of Penn town- 
ship ; Charles Sumner, who is operating land belonging to his father ; 
Laura Pearl, the wife of Rev. Edward DiiFenbough, a Methodist 
preacher stationed at Altona, Illinois: Lottie Alice, the wife of 
Samuel Stuffacher, of JNIonroe, ^Visconsin; John Harrison, who is 
station agent at El Paso; and Jessie ]Mabel, a school teacher at 
Oneida. Illinois. 

IMr. Gleason is a stanch republican in his political belief and for 
about twenty years has served as a member of the school board and 
has also held the office of road commissioner. Both he and his wife 
are affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal church and take a keen 
interest in its work. He has never had occasion to regret his choice 
of an occupation for he has gained financial independence and has 
also found farming congenial work. His home is modern and well 
kept up, and its attractiveness is enhanced by shade and orchard trees 
which he himself planted. 



F. B. HALLOC'lv. 



F. B. Hallock, pleasantly located on section 11, Elmira town- 
ship, occupies an attractive residence, thoroughly modern, which 
stands in the midst of an excellent tract of land of two hundred and 
fifty acres, which retin-ns to the owner a golden tribute for the care 
and labor bestowed upon it. Mr. Hallock was born in Pawpaw town- 



^^^^^^^^^"^^^*J^B» •» JB 






^^^^^^^■sIr ^^^^IE&Si^^^I 






VHn 






f jB'" « ^H ■ 



1'. IS. HALL()(.K AND I'AMII.'i 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

{1M1VEF.S1TY OF ILLINGi: 



i 



HISTOKV OF STARK COUNTY 299 

ship, De Kalb county, Illinois, ]March 4, 184<j. During his infancy 
his mother died and he was reared by a family of the name of Hallock, 
by which name he has always been known. His own father went 
Avest in 1849 and was never heard from again. 

F. B. Hallock spent the days of his boyhood and youth in Lee 
county, Illinois, there remaining until after the outbreak of hostili- 
ties between the north and the south, when his patriotic spirit was 
aroused by the attempt to overthrow the Union, and on the 11th 
of January, 1862, he enlisted as a member of Company D, Fifty- 
third Illinois Volunteer Infantry, for three years, or during the wai". 
After serving for thirteen and a half months, however, he was hon- 
orablj' discharged because of physical disability. Later he came to 
Stark countj^ and here remained until he could no longer content 
himself to remain at home when the nation was battling for existence. 
He therefore enlisted again, joining Company D, First Illinois 
Artillery, with which he served for eighteen months, rendering valu- 
able aid to his country. During his first enlistment he jjarticipated 
in the battles of Shiloh and Little Hatchet, and during the period of 
his second enlistment he took part in the engagements at Big Shanty, 
Vicksburg, Kenesaw JMountain, the siege of Atlanta and the battle 
of Nashville, returning home in 186.5 with a most creditable military 
record. 

JMr. Hallock once more took up his abode in Lee county, Illinois, 
where he began farming, residing there until 187.3, when he estab- 
lished his home on a farm near Elmira. He then conducted a dairy 
and became the pioneer cheese maker of Stark county. After con- 
tinuing at his original place for five years he bought a farm about 
two miles south of Osceola, where he continued in the manufacture 
of cheese for four years. He then began feeding cattle and devoted 
his energies to that business for five years. On the expiration of 
that period he came to his present place of residence, erecting a fine 
home, supplied with all modern equipments and conveniences and 
affording him all of the comforts of life now that he is approaching 
the evening of his days. His farming property comprises two hun- 
dred and fifty acres of rich and productive land, which returns to 
him a gratifying annual income. 

In North Adams, INIassachusetts, Mr. Hallock was united in 
marriage to ^Nliss Anna E. Clarke, and they have become the parents 
of four children: ]\Iabel, the wife of George W. Norris, living in 
Neponset, Illinois; Minnie, at home; Frank W., who is engaged in 
feeding cattle on his father's farm; and William O., who is attend- 
ing school at Pella, Iowa. 

Vol. IT— 15 



300 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

Mr. Hallock has always given his influence on the side of moral 
teachings and is one of the trustees of the ^Methodist Episcopal 
church and is serving on its building committee. In politics he has 
been a lifelong republican, supporting the party since age conferred 
upon him the right of franchise. He has filled some local offices, act- 
inu- as collector for Ave years and as assessor for one term. In 1803 
he became a member of the Odd Fellows lodge at East Pawpaw, 
Illinois, passed through all of the chairs and became a member of 
the encampment and also of the Rel)ekah lodge. He is a valued 
representative of the Grand Army of the Republic, passed through 
all of the chairs in James Jackson Post, No. 37, and has been adju- 
tant for about twelve years. He enjoys this association Avith his 
former comrades, recounting the incidents when they went on the 
long, hard campaigns, fought in hotly contested battles or rested in 
winter quarters. The same spirit of loyalty in citizenship has char- 
acterized him throughout his entire life, and he is as greatly interested 
in the welfare of his country today as when he followed the stars and 
stripes upon southern battlefields. 



JUDGE WILLIAI^I WILBERFORCE WRIGHT. 

Modern philosophical reasoning has evolved the thought that "Not 
the good that comes to us. but the good that comes to the world 
through us is the measure of our success." Judged by this standard 
the life of Judge AVilliam Wilberforce Wright was a most successful 
one. He did much to uphold the legal and political status of his com- 
munity and to advance its intellectual and moral growth. Never was 
his position upon any vital question an equivocal one and the high 
regard entertained for his opinions resulted in a large following for 
any cause which he advocated. The second son of Captain AVilliam 
Wilberforce and Anne Matilda (Creighton) Wright, he was born 
in Canton, Illinois, September 10, 1842. His father was a native 
of Hanover, New Hampshire, and belonged to a family whicli settled 
in New England in 166.5. and some of whose members participated 
in the struggle for independence. The mother of our subject was of 
Scotch-Irish descent and came to this country from the county of 
Cavan, Ireland. 

William Wilberforce Wright finished his education in the Galva 
high school and then farmed with his father near Toulon until of 
age. In 1862 he began the study of law in the office of Hon. Miles A. 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 301 

Fuller, in Toulon. In 1864 he enlisted for service in the Civil war, 
becoming a member of the One Hundred and Thirtj'-ninth Regiment 
of Illinois Volunteer Infantry, a one hundred day regiment, in which 
he served as sergeant nearly six months, voluntarily remaining until 
the end of the war was assured. 

On his return to Illinois Mr. Wright finished his legal studies 
and was admitted to the bar at a term of the supreme court, held at 
JMount Vernon in Xovember, 1860, and was in practice in Toulon 
from that date until his death, September 30, 1912. He was consid- 
ered to be one of the most honest, upright and just attorneys that ever 
jsracticed law in this county. He was not only faithful to his clients, 
but also just to his opjjonents. It was his custom, whenever possible, 
to effect a settlement of dift'erences outside rather than to brin<>- his 
clients into court. In politics he was a republican, an ardent admirer 
of Lincoln and a contemporary of Robert G. IngersoU. 

JMr. AVright served Stark county. Illinois, six years as master in 
chancery and twenty-five years as comity judge, while continuing 
practice in the higher courts. He was a delegate from the Peoria 
district to the national republican convention at Chicago in 1884; at 
the district convention in 1880 he was within Init one vote of the nom- 
ination for representative to congress, and lacked that only because 
of his well known temperance sentiments. He was a man who was 
much interested in the welfare of the community, taking a great inter- 
est in educational matters. He was a member of the Toulon Debating 
Society, an organization which brought many noted men to this town, 
such as ^Vendell I'hillips and Theodore Tilden. He served as presi- 
dent of the high school board of education and also as a member of the 
board of trustees of Toulon Academy. 

He united with the Toulon Congregational church on November 
13. 1853, seven years after the church Avas organized. A brother of 
his father, Samuel G. Wright, was pastor of the cliurch at the time. 
On November 29, 1890, the fiftieth anniversary of tlie church was 
lield and Judge Wright delivered the historical address. He held suc- 
cessively the ofl^ces of trustee, clerk, treasurer, was elected deacon 
December 1, 1883, and continued in that office ujj to the time of his 
death. During his relationship with the church he became very much 
interested in the Sabbath scliool work and served as superintendent 
for a considerable time. His interest in the Sabbatli school work was 
not confined to tlie church alone but to the town and surrounding- 
country. While he was superintendent Dwight L. JNIoody was 
lirought here and delivered some inspiring addresses. 

Judge Wright was married ]May 19, 1875, to j\Iary Harrison 



302 HISTOKV OF STARK COUNTY 

Hopkins, a daughter of Hon. Joel W. Hopkins, of Granville, Put- 
nam county, Illinois, and to them were born the following named: 
Eleanor ^Matilda, William Wilberforce and Helen Gertrude, who 
survive him; and ]Mary, who died in infancy. 

No man was more modest in his behavior, unassuming in his 
aspirations; always a thorough gentleman, sincere and courageous, 
yielding to no temptation of temporary expediences in defense of his 
conduct, he was ever keenly alive to the best and highest interests of 
his fellowmen. In his chin-ch relations he was faithful to the service 
of the church and the doctrines of the Bible, and had a religious 
experience that shed over his life a halo of hope whose eif ulgence made 
light the gloom in the lives of others. He lived a life that may well 
become the aim of every man; it was one of strong and abiding faith 
in the eternal verities of religion, and he could say with Paul, the old 
soldier of the cross, "I have fought a good fight; I have finished my 
course; henceforth there is left for me a crown of righteousness." 



GEORGE A. WAS SON. 

George A. Wasson owns the Sylvan VicAv Farm on section 2.3, 
West Jersey township, which consists of two hundred and forty acres 
and is there successfully engaged in raising both grain and stock. 
He was born in Peoria county, Illinois, on the 20th of November, 
18.36. and is a son of John Wasson and a grandson of George Wasson. 
both natives of the state of New York. The last named met death 
by an accident. John Wasson grew to manhood in Cajiiga county, 
New York, but in 18.50 located in Peoria. Illinois, then a small village. 
After devoting some time to getting out ties for the railroad and to 
working as a farm liand he rented land for three years and also did 
some teaming. Subsetiuently he purchased forty acres of land for 
twelve luuidred dollars, buying the property on time as he had no capi- 
tal. The first year was so rainy that crops were poor and he was unable 
to make any payment upon the farm and wished to give up tlie jilace. 
HoAvever, the people from whom he had purchased it told him to 
continue to cultivate it and to pay when he could. He eventually dis- 
charged all his indebtedness upon the farm, which he operated for a 
number of years. At length he disposed of it and bought a one hun- 
dred and sixty acre tract of land which he broke and fenced and 
improved with a good house and a substantial barn. He also set out 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 303 

an orchard and in time the place became one of the most highly 
developed farm projjerties of the locality. He also pnrchased an 
adjoining eighty acres and an additional sixty acre tract and likewise 
owned property in the city of Peoria. His last years were spent in 
that city, Avhere he lived retired. He suffered a stroke of paralysis 
on Thanksgiving Day and died on Sunday, and his wife died on Sun- 
day of the following week from the same cause, she being stricken 
on the day of his funeral. They were both members of the JNIethodist 
Episcopal church and he served on the official board. They were the 
parents of ten children, five sons and five daughters. 

George A. Wasson was reared upon the home farm in Peoria 
county and is indebted for his education to the district schools. He 
remained a\ ith his father until he reached mature years and through 
assisting with the work gained valuable training in agricultural pur- 
suits. Subsequently he purchased eighty acres of land in Pi-inceville 
township, Peoria county, and for five years engaged in farming that 
])lace, his sister Ella keejjing house for him. At the end of that time 
he sold the farm at a good profit and bought his present place, the 
Sylvan View Farm, which comprises two hundred and forty acres on 
section 2.5, West Jersey township, Stark county. In order to pur- 
chase it he Avent into debt seven thousand dollars. He took up his 
residence upon the place in 1903 and has since engaged in its operation. 
He ]-aises good crojjs annually and also derives a gratifying profit 
from the sale of his high grade stock. He has paid off the indebted- 
ness upon the farm and ranks among tlie substantial residents of West 
Jersey townsliip. He has erected a large and modern residence pro- 
vided with acetylene light, furnace heat, hot and cold water and the 
barns and other farm buildings are all substantial and well designed. 
The value of the farm is also increased by a fine orchard which 
Mr. Wasson set out. In addition to the Sylvan View Farm he owns 
three hundred and twenty acres in Traverse county, Minnesota, ^vhich 
is improved and is rented. 

INIr. Wasson was married on the 6th of April, 1903, to jNIiss Emma . 
"White, a daughter of James E. White, a resident of Toulon and a 
veteran of the Civil war. Mm. Wasson was born and reared in 
Illinois. JNIr. and Mrs. Wasson have one son, Orville J. who is his 
father's partner in the ojoeration of the home farm. He received a 
high school education in Toulon and his wife, who bore the maiden 
name of Ruth Lyon, also attended high school there. They have one 
daughter, Flora Emily. He has a great deal of mechanical ability 
and is an expert blacksmith and machinist although he never served 
an api^renticeship. He lias a well equipped shop and works in both 



■Mi HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

steel and wood. He understands tlioroughly the construction oi an 
automobile and is able to make needed repairs upon his car. 

INIr. Wasson, of this review, was formerly a member of the 
Patrons of Husbandry or the Grange and took an active j^art in that 
organization, serving for several years in the office of lecturer. In 
l)olitics he is independent, but although he manifests a commendable 
interest in public affairs he has never sought office. He has gained 
a wide circle of friends in Stark county and is recognized as one of its 
most up-to-date and successful farmers and stock raisers. 



GEORGE T. OLIVER. 

That Stark county offers to her people many oppf)rtunities and 
advantages is indicated in the fact that a large proportion of her 
native-born citizens have remained within her borders, content with 
conditions here found. To this class belongs George T. 01i^•tl•. who 
was born in 18.59, on the farm on section 30, Elmira township, upon 
which he still resides. He is descended from Scotch ancestry, being a 
grandson of Thomas Oliver, who was born in Roxbui'ghshire. Scot- 
land, and came to the United States about 1836. He made his way 
into the interior of the country and cast in his lot with the pioneer 
settlers of Illinois. Only four years before had the Black Hawk 
war occurred, and there were great sections of the state that were 
unclaimed and undeveloped. Thomas Oliver established his home in 
the midst of a native timber tract in Elmira township and there in the 
midst of the forest began to hew out the farm u])on which George T. 
Oliver was born many years later. He had made purchase of tliis 
farm in 1838, paying the usual government price of a dollar and a 
quarter per acre. He hauled the first building material brought into 
this county from Chicago, and he also took his wheat to market in 
Chicago. He had been a shepherd in Scotland and after coming to 
the new world engaged quite extensively in handling sheep, while his 
sons performed the work of cultivating the fields and raising grain. 
After the marriage of his son Adam the grandfather, Thomas Oliver, 
removed across the road to the farm now occupied by Oliver TurnbuU 
and there he passed away aliout 18(56, when George T. Oliver was a 
little lad of six years. 

Adam Oliver, his son, was born in Scotland and was about twenty 
years of age at the time the family made the long voyage across the 
Atlantic to the new world. As previously indicated, he became an 




ADAM OLIVP]R 




JOHN OLIVER HENRY OLIVER 

ANDREW OLIVER WILLIAM OLIVER THOMAS OLIVER 



LIBRARY 

OF THE 

UNIVERIITY OF lUINOll 



HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 307 

active assistant of his father in the development and cultivation of tlie 
home farm, ujion wliich he continued to reside until called to his final 
rest. He came into possession of the property and was the owner of 
three hundred and sixty acres of rich, valuable and i^roductive land, 
devoting his entire life thereon to farming and stock raising. He 
liassed away in 188.5, and is yet remembered by many of the older 
settlers, who knew liim as a man of sterling worth. He liad married 
Agnes Davidson, who was a native of the same shire in Scotland as 
her husband and wlio had come with her parents to the United States 
a short time after the arrival of tlie Oliver family, the Davidsons 
settling in ^larshall county, Illinois. JNIrs. Oliver survived her hus- 
band for about four years, dying in 1889. He had been previously 
married, liis first wife having been Polly Anne Parks, by whom he had 
one daughter. Polly Anne, who is now living in Elmira townshi}). The 
children of the second marriage were six in numl)er: George, now 
deceased: ^Margaret, the wife of M. M. Brace, of Kewanee, Illinois; 
Tliomas, who has passed away; Jessie, tlie wife of Edward Tunni- 
cliif, of Burwell, Nebraska; George T.; and Helen, the wife of M. T. 
Tuttle, of Lenox, Iowa. 

After attending the district schools George T. Oliver spent one 
year as a student in jNIonmoutli College and at the deatli of his father 
took over the business of further developing and improving the liome 
farm. He has one of the three lie^jt places in Elmira townshiji and he 
has ])ut u])on the farm many of its present modern improvements, all 
of which are of excellent character. He has four liundred and seventy 
acres in the home place, together with one hundred and sixty acres 
elsewhere in Elmira township, and he makes a specialty of raising 
polled Hereford cattle and has also fed cattle very extensively. His 
l^lace is known as the Pioneer Stock Farm, and the i)roperty has been 
under one name for a longer period than any other farm in that section 
of the county. 

On the 1st of January, 1883, jMr. Oliver was united in marriage to 
Miss Luella jNI. Fuller, by whom he had three children, as follows: 
Luella F. and Editli. botli at home: and Margaret, who gave her hand 
in marriage to Robert "Weeks, of Elmira township. The wife and 
mother passed away in 189.5, and four years later INIr. Oliver was again 
married, his second union being with INIiss Belle F. Jackson, by whom 
he has two children. Rutli and Adam, both at home. 

^Slr. Oliver has been a lifelong republican and is of the progressive 
type. He has served for twelve years as supervisor and in other local 
offices and lias also been school director. He and liis wife are members 
of tlie United Presbyterian churcli, in tlie work of wliicli thev ai-e 



308 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

actively and helplully interested, ]Mr. Oliver serving as one of the 
trustees and as elder. His entire life has been an expression of high 
and honorable jirinciples and in his business career he has ever been 
thoroughly reliable, never taking advantage of the necessities of his 
fellow-men in any transaction but building up his business along con- 
structive lines and winning his prosperity through honorable effort. 



ELBA V. GRAVES. 



Ellia V. Graves is a member of the firm of ]Miller & Graves, grain 
dealers of Duncan and is also manager of the local branch of the 
business of Scott, Walters & Rakestraw, bankers of "Wyoming. His 
birth occurred in Vinton county, Ohio, on the 20th of January, 1 862, 
and his parents were Jacob and Sidna A. (Barnett) Graves. The 
father was born in Vinton county, Ohio, on the 19th of September, 
183-1. while the mother was a native of Guernsey county, Ohio. They 
were married on the 13th of Xovember, 18.56, and remained in the 
Buckeye state until 1864, when with their family they came to Stark 
count J', Illinois. The father purchased eighty acres of land in Essex 
township, on which he lived until his demise on the 3d of September, 
1913. He had long survived his wife, who passed away on the 14th 
of July, 1887. He was a republican and served as assessor of Essex 
township for a number of years and as supervisor for some time. He 
had eleven children, of whom ten are still living. Emory R. died in 
1894, when seventeen years of age. Those who survive are: ^Nlary 
A., the widow of Charles E. Fonts, of Ottawa, Kansas; Arilla. the 
wife of William Schiebel, of St. Croix Falls, Wisconsin; Elba V.; 
Smiley R., who resides in Duncan, Illinois; Stanley S., a farmer of 
Essex townshiiJ; Lyman S., who is in the employ of Brown & Upper- 
man at "Wyoming; Julia E., the wife of Peter Shurts, of Hector, 
Minnesota; Clinton E., a resident of Weston, Illinois; Elton O.. who 
is farming in Essex township; and Jennie, the wife of C. F. Addis, of 
West Jersey township. 

Elba V. Graves was but two years of age wlien brought by his 
parents to this county and Avas reared upon the home farm in Essex 
township. He is indebted for his education to the district schools and 
wlien twenty-two years of age he went to work for A. J. Scott, a grain 
dealer of Duncan, and three years later bought a half interest in the 
business, the firm becoming Scott & Graves. In 1900 ]Mr. Scott's 
son-in-law bought his interest in the business, which has since been 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 309 

conducted under the style of Miller & Graves. They not only deal 
in grain hut also handle luniher and various kinds of huilding material, 
including lime and cement. During all the years that the husiness 
has been in existence it has been conducted along lines of strictest 
honesty and its well earned reputation for fair dealing is one of its 
most valuable assets. It has gained a large patronage and the men 
Avho are conducting it are numbered among the leaders in commercial 
circles of Duncan. ]Mr. Graves devotes the greater part of his timc 
and attention to the management of this business but also has charge 
of the interests at Duncan of Scot, Walters & Rakestraw, bankers 
of Wyoming. His sound judgment and husiness acumen are mani- 
fest in his enterprises, and he has succeeded in all that he has 
undertaken. 

Mr. Graves was married in 1890 to ]Miss JNIiranda INI. JNIoody, who 
was born in Peoria county, Illinois, and is a daughter of Talleyrand 
and Harriet JMoody, the former deceased and the latter still living in 
Peoria county. jNIr. and Mrs. Graves have eight children, namely: 
Walter C, a farmer of Essex toAvnship, who married Miss Sadie Fritz 
and has one child, Eugene; Lois A., who is teaching school and resides 
at home; Milo E., who is assisting his father in husiness; Stella I., who 
is also teaching and lives at home; and Homer M., Ernest V., Oliver 
W. and Archie R., all at home. 

jNIr. Graves is a republican in politics, believing that new conditions 
of life should be met by new policies of government. He formerly 
served for a number of years as school trustee and has never ceased 
to take a keen interest in the welfare of tlie public schools. He holds 
membership in the Modern Woodmen of America at Duncan, and his 
wife belongs to the INIethodist Episcopal church. His advancement 
in business has been continuous since he began his independent career 
and he is now one of the well-to-do residents of his town. 



C. R. JACKSON. 



C. R. Jackson, who is farming one hvnidred acres of good land on 
section 30, Valley township, was born in the town of Stark, Stark 
county, on the 26th of July, 1883. His ])arents, Percy and Elizabeth 
(Dunn) Jackson, were both born in Illinois and are now living in 
Wyoming, this county. 

C. R. Jackson is indebted for his education to the public schools 
and to his father for his earlv and thorough training in agricultural 



310 HISTORY OF STARK COUXTV 

work. He is now operating the homestead, which comprises one hun- 
dred acres, and his well directed labors are rewarded by good crops. 
He also raises high grade stock, for which he finds a ready sale on 
the market, and his resources are constantly increasing. He is both 
practical and progressive and ranks among the efficient young farmers 
of the county. 

In 1910 JNIr. Jackson was united in marriage to ]Miss Grace Thur- 
ston, a daughter of William Thurston, and to their union has been 
born a son, ^Vilbur Richard. Since age conferred upon liim the 
right of franchise 3Ir. Jackson has supported tlie candidates and 
measures of the republican party but he has never been an aspirant 
for office. Both he and his wife attend the Congregational church 
of Wyoming and support all movements seeking the moral advance- 
ment of their community. He has gained a measure of success that 
would be creditable to a man several years his senior and his knowledge 
of farming and his industry insure his continued prosperity. His 
entire life has been spent in Stark county and the fact that tliose who 
have known him intimately fi-om boyhood are his sincerest friends is 
proof of his genuine worth. 



ROBERT ALEXANDER ADAMS. 

It is always witli a feeling of regret that the public learns of the 
passing of one of its old-time citizens, especially if such a one has 
manifested sterling traits of manhood and citizensliip and lias dis- 
phiyed loyalty and progressiveness in connection with pul)lic affairs. 
Such was the record of Robert Alexander Adams, who was a valued 
and wortliy citizen of Penn township. He was born in Bedford 
county, Pennsylvania, on tlie IGth of July, 184.5. and had passed the 
sixty-sixth milestone on life's journey wlien called to tlie liome beyond. 
He was an only son and lost his mother when but eiglit years of age. 
His father afterward married again and by that marriage there were 
five children, three of whom are yet li\ing: ]Mrs. ]\Iary Markland. 
whose liome is at Wakita. Oklahoma: William O.. a resident of Ham- 
mond. Indiana; and Samuel B.. living at Wyoming, Illinois. 

Robert A. Adams was reared in the usual manner of farm lads, 
acquiring a district school education througli tlie winter months, while 
in the summer seasons he worked u])on the home farm. He remained 
witli his father until he reached the age of twenty-two years, wlien 
lie started out in life on his own account. He was married on the 31st 



d 

en 

O 

W 
.1i 



> 




LiLiMAHT 
OF THE 

ITV f)C \l I IWAl« 

_j i I t \Ji t .. w , . . - 



HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY :n3 

of December, 1808, to 31is.s "Slary E. Earhart and they began their 
domestic life on a farm in Penn township. Stark county. ^Vith the 
passing years five children came to bless their union but three of the 
number died in early life. Those who still survive are Alva and Harry 
F., who yet remain upon the old home farm near Castleton. 

Tlu'oughout his entire life IMr. Adams continued to engage in gen- 
eral agricultural pursuits and he brought his fields to a high state of 
cultivation, so that he annually harvested good crops. He also added 
to his farm modern improvements, including the best farm machinery. 
Every part of his farm indicated the practical and progressive methods 
of the owner, whose work resulted in bringing to him substantial 
success. 

Business, however, constituted but one jjhase of his life, for he had 
time for his friends and for public service. He was respected by all 
who knew him because his life was ever upright and honorable and he 
was loved by many because of his kindliness and lielpfulness. He was 
continually extending tlie hand of assistance to some one who needed 
aid and was ever ready to speak a word of encouragement. His integ- 
i-ity in all business affairs was above question, liis word being ever as 
good as any bond solemnized by signature or seal. Such a life record 
is proof of the statement that an honored name is rather to be chosen 
than great riclies. 



FRED H. FLEMING. 



Fred H. Fleming, mIio resides on section 12, West Jersey town- 
ship, is the efficient superintendent of the Stark county farm, a posi- 
tion which he has satisfactorily filled for the past fifteen years. He 
dates his residence in tliis county from 18.)!', having been brought to 
Illinois when but a year old. He was born in Clearfield county, 
Pennsylvania, INIay 2.5, 18.53, and his father, Samuel Fleming, was a 
native of the same locality, there being reared to matiu'e years, after 
which he wedded jMiss Rebecca Bonsel, who was likewise a native of 
Clearfield county. Samuel Fleming followed the occupation of car- 
pentering, continuing active in tliat field of building operations for a 
number of years. On his removal to Illinois in 18.54i he settled in 
Elniira. Stark county, and tliere took up contracting as well as carpen- 
ter work, in wliich lie continued for several years. He afterward 
purchased a tract of eighty acres of new huid and opened up a farm, 
performing all of tlie arduous labor incident to the initial cultivation 



314 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

of the fields. Subsequently he purchased another tract of twenty-six 
acres, thus becoming the owner of a farm of one huiuh-ed and six 
acres, ujion which he made fair improvements and thereon reared his 
family. As the years jjassed his success increased and he acquired a 
comiietence that enabled him to live retired in his later years. Remov- 
ing to Toulon, he there resided until his death, which occurred when 
he had reached the ripe old age of ninety-five. For some years he had 
survived his wife. 

Fred H. Fleming lias known no other home than Stark county and 
his business activities have largely connected him with its farming 
interests. When a young lad he began work in the fields and his 
responsibilities broadened as his age and strength increased. He 
attended the public schools and when a young man served for a time as 
mail carrier between Elmira and Xeponset. After a year, Iiom ever. 
he resinned farming and for one year cultivated a tract of land which 
he rented in Toulon township. He afterward removed to Taylor 
county, Iowa, and for one season was emj^loyed as a farm hand near 
I^enox, but at the end of that brief period returned to Stark county, 
where he and his brother David jinrchased a tract of one hundred and 
sixty acres of partially improved land in Goshen township. They 
continued to engage in farming in partnership for a j^eriod, but later 
Fred H. Fleming sold out to his brother and established a rug and 
carpet shop just north of the city of Toulon. He operated that for 
two years, on the expiration of which ])eriod he was appointed to 
his present position of superintendent of the Stark county poor farm, 
which comprises one hundred and sixty acres of good land, ^\hich he 
carefully and systematically cultivates. ^Vhen he took charge of the 
place there was much work needed to be done in the way of repairs 
and improvements and he now has everything in first class condition, 
carrying on the farm work with the aid of a hired man, Avhile Mrs. 
Fleming manages the household affairs with the assistance of a maid. 
During the winter there are about fourteen people on an average who 
are inmates of the home, mostly aged people, unable to work, but 
through the summer there are less than half that number. The yearlj' 
expense amounts to about four thousand dollars, Avhile the revenue 
from the farm amounts to two thousand dollars. Sir. Fleming keeps 
some cattle and hogs and also has good horses upon the place. The 
buildings and fences are kept in a good state of repair and everything 
indicates his careful management. 

On the 12th of February, 1880, Mr. Fleming was married, in 
Elmira. to Sliss Elizabeth Moffitt, who was born and reared in Elmira 
and there pursued a public school education. Her father, William 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 315 

]\I()ffitt, was a native of the north of Irehuid. Mr. and INIrs. Fleming 
have two children : Jessie, a well educated young lady, now employed 
as a stenographer in Toulon; and Clyde, who is employed in a 
plumbing business in Toulon. He is married and has three children. 
]Mr. and JNIrs. Fleming also lost a daughter, Margaret, when three 
years of age. and a child who died in infancy. 

^Ir. Fleming belongs to the JNlodern Woodmen camp and his wife 
is a member of the Congregational churcii. Both are well known and 
enjoy the warm regard of all \\'ith whom social or business relations 
have brought them in contact. 



JOHX AND SAINIUEL DOWN. 

John and Samuel Down, who are successfully engaged in farming 
and stock raising on one hundred and sixty acres of fine land 
on section 21, Valley township, are sons of William and Elizabeth 
(Cutler) Down, the former born in Devonshire, England, and the 
latter in Suffolkshire, England. The father came to the United 
States when seventeen years of age and the mother was brought here 
by her parents when four years old. INIr. and Mrs. Down were mar- 
ried in Peoria county. Illinois, and remained there for several years, 
but on the 11th of ]March, 1866, located on section 21, Valley toAvn- 
ship. Stark county, where they lived until called by death. The father 
learned the shoemaker's trade during his youth but after his renio\ al 
to the United States engaged in farming. He took an active interest 
in public aflt\iirs and served as assessor, collector and in varioiis other 
local offices. Both he and his wife were Congregationalists in religious 
faith. He passed away about 1878 and she survived until the 8th of 
]May, 1914. To them were born the following children: William, 
deceased; John; INIary, the wife of Lewis Warren, who resides near 
Red Oak, Iowa: Thomas, a farmer of Stark county: Samuel; Cora, 
who married J. S. ^IcGraw, of Dimlai), Illinois; and Bertha, the wife 
of Henry Klipfer, of Essex township. 

John Down was born in Akron townshijj, Peoria County, Illinois, 
on the 21st of April, 186.3, and Samuel Down was born on INIay 28, 
1871, in Valley township. Stark county. Both received their educa- 
tion in the public schools and were early trained bj^ their fathei- in 
agricultural work. They have never left the home farm, which they 
are now o])erating on their own account, and they rank among the 
most ]irogressive and most practical stock raisers of the county. They 



316 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

have made many improvements upon the farm, which comprises one 
hundred and sixty acres, and they derive a gratifying income from 
their well directed labors. 

In 1909 Samuel Down was united in marriage to jNIiss Cora Duok- 
woith, by whom he has three children, Charles Prescott, Alice Eliza- 
beth and John Henry. Both brothers are democrats in politics and 
attend the Congregational church. They are connected fraternally 
with the Woodmen and the JNIaccabees and are popular within and 
without those organizations. Their dominant characteristics are such 
as never fail to command respect and warm regard. 



JAMES JAY M AH ANY. 

James Jay ]Mahany, devoting his time and energies to general 
agricultural pursuits and to the raising and feeding of stock for the 
market, is the owner of three hundred and twenty acres of productive 
land on section 1, West Jersey township, this place being known as 
the old INIahany homestead. It was on this farm that he first opened 
his eyes to the light of day on the 13th of February, 1887. He is a 
representative of an old family of Stark county and his father, 
James Yan Buren ]Mahany, Avas born in Toulon township, was reared 
upon a farm and was married in this county to ]Miss Belle Cairn, Mho 
was born in Indiana and there spent nuich of her girlhood. ]Mr. and 
INIrs. ]Mahany began their domestic life on the farm now owned by 
their son Jay. the father and his brother owning a half section of land, 
which they converted from a ti-act of raw prairie into well tilled fields. 
Xot a furrow had been turned when the farm came into their posses- 
sion and they bent every energy toward the cultivation of the land. 
James Yan Buren ]Mahany afterward purchased his brother's interest, 
thus becoming the owner of three hundred and twenty acres. For a 
long ])eriod he was a prominent and influential agriculturist of his 
conimunity and the intelligent manner in which he directed his inter- 
ests and his unfaltering activity brought him a substantial measure of 
success, enal)ling him in his later years to live retired from business. 
During that period he resided in Toulon, where he passed away in 
1 909. His widow still survives, as do their three children : James Jay ; 
Clarence L., who is married and resides in Toulon; and Verina. who is 
a student in the high school at Toulon. 

When a little lad of about six years James Jay ^Mahany began to 
apply himself to the mastery of those branches of learning which are 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 317 

taught in the district schools and subsequently he had the benefit of 
instruction in the schools of Toulon. His time was divided between 
tlie school rooui and the fields, for through the summer months he 
assisted in the task of cultivating and developing his father's land. 
In January, 1909, in Galesburg, Illinois, he wedded JNIiss Neva M. 
Smith, who was born and reared in Stark county, a daughter of Oliver 
Smith. The young couple began their married life upon the farm 
which has since been their home and he has steadily carried on the 
work of improvement and development. He has erected a neat house 
for the tenant, also put up some of the outbuildings and has kept the 
place in excellent condition, so that it forms one of the attractive 
features of the landscape. He makes a business of feeding a large 
number of hogs each year, specializing in the handling of Chester 
Whites. 

]\Ir. and ^Irs. ^lahaiiy have but one son, Raljjh. JNIr. ^Nlahany is 
a member of the Federal Reserve Life Association. His activities 
have ever been concentrated upon his business affairs and that he is 
now one of the prosperous citizens of his community is due to his 
close application, his diligence and his unfaltering purpose. To him 
work is no hardship. It calls forth his enei-gy and his best efforts and 
he finds delight in the correct solution of a business problem. 



C. A. BOWES. 



C. A. Bowes, who is operating eighty acres of land in Valley town- 
ship, was born upon that farm on the ITtli of March, 1882, of the 
marriage of George and Sarah (Hempson) Bowes, natives respect- 
ively of Canada and of England. The father is of English and Irish 
ancestry. He lived for some time in New York city but at length 
removed to Stark county and purchased land, on which he still makes 
his home although it is farmed by our subject. 

C. A. Bowes was reared upon the homestead and as a boy and 
youth gained valual)le knowledge through assisting his father. His 
education, however, was not neglected as he completed a course in the 
public schools. He is now operating the home farm of eighty acres 
although he resides in the town of Stark. He is up-to-date and 
energetic in carrying on all of his work and his well directed labors are 
rewarded by good crops. He also raises stock to some extent and finds 
that liranch of agricidture likewise profitable. 

On the 4.th of May, 1912, jNIr. Bowes was united in marriage to 



318 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

Mi,s.s ^Myrtle O'Leary, by wliuni he has a son, Russell A. Mr. Bowes 
indorses the principles of the democratic party and loyally supports 
its candidates at the polls. For six years he has served as town clerk 
and for one year he held the office of tax collector. He takes a keen 
interest in pviblic affairs and has made an excellent record as an 
official. Fraternally he is identified with the I\lodern AVoodmen of 
America at Stark and he attends the local church. He is a young man 
of ability and integrity and has gained the warm friendship of many. 



FRANK V. ADDIS. 



Frank V. Addis, who is serving for the third year as a member of 
the county board of supervisors as the representative of West Jersey 
township, ranks not only as a public-spirited citizen but also as a 
progressive business man and farmer, his home being on section 10, 
West Jersey township. It was upon this farm that he was boi-n 
October 7, 1865, and he comes of English ancestry. His paternal 
grandfather, Simon Addis, was a native of Warren county, New 
Jersey, born in 1804, and there he remained until after the birth of 
D. O. Addis, father of Frank V. Addis, on the 6th of September, 
18.38. It was in 18.51 that Simon Addis removed westward with his 
family to Illinois, establishing his home in Stark county. D. O. Addis 
was at that time a youth of thirteen years and his education was largely 
acquired in the public schools of Warren county. He became the 
active assistant of his father in farm Avork and remained upon the 
family homestead in Stark county until after he attained his majority. 
It was in this county on the 13th of September. 1861.. that he was 
united in marriage to jNIiss JNIargaret N. Caskey, a daughter of Silas 
Caskey, who removed to Illinois from Stark county. Ohio, in 1863, 
bccominff a resident of Stark county, Illinois. ]Mrs. Addis Avas born 
and reared in Ohio. Mr. and jNIrs. Addis began their domestic life 
on the old homestead farm and he proved an industrious and enterpris- 
inff agriculturist. His business affairs were wisely and carefully 
managed and from time to time he made judicious investments in 
property, becoming the owner of seven hundred acres of land in \Vest 
Jersey township. He erected a pleasant residence on section 10. also 
put up substantial and commodious barns and outbuildings and his 
time was unreservedly given to his farm work until 1902, when he 
removed to Toulon, Avhere he purchased a residence, there living 
retired until his demise, which occurred November 29, 1909. His 



LIBRARy 

OF THE 

?!!\!!VEP.S!Ty OF ILL!?!C!S 




FRAXK \". ADDIS 




F 



':^9^ iii 



■^•* 




MRS. FRANK \. ADDIS 



!!M!Ve?.S!lV OF IL'JMOIS 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 323 

business enterprise, his ability and liis public spirit made him well 
known not only in Stark but also in adjacent comities. He was a 
man of the strictest integrity and honor and enjoyed the confidence 
and esteem of all who knew him. He belonged to the West Jersey 
IMethodist Episcopal church and served on its official board. Later 
he jjlaced his membership with the JNIethodist church of Toulon and 
was likewise made a member of its official board, so continuing until 
his death. The influence of his life remains as a blessed benediction 
to those who knew him and his memory is revered and cherished by 
those with whom he came in contact. 

To ]Mr. and JNIrs. D. O. Addis Avere born seven children, four 
of whom are living: Frank V., of this review; Flora O., the wife of 
Clyde Boyd, of Toulon; Evelyn B., «ho married John Kayser, of 
Parkston, South Dakota; and Pearl H., the wife of Arthur Grange, 
of Toulon. Another son, Alvin W., reached adult age and passed 
away upon the home farm when a young man of twenty-five years. 
A daughter, Laura E., died at the age of six years, and another daugh- 
ter, Grace E., when three years of age. The mother, Mrs. Addis, 
resides at the old home in Toulon and she has been a loyal member of 
the iMethodist Episcopal church since April 10. 1860. 

Frank V. Addis was reared on the old home place and mastered 
the branches of learning taught in the district schools before entering 
the Toulon high school. He willingly performed the tasks assigned 
him by his father, whom he continued to assist in the work of the 
fields until he had attained his majority. He was a young man of 
twenty-six years, when, in AVest Jersey township, on the 9th of 
December, 1891, he was united in marriage to Miss Ellen Wiley, who 
was born in Stark county, Illinois. They began their domestic life 
on one of his father's farms, known as tlie Hazen place, and there 
remained for a number of years. In 1901 his father removed to 
Toulon and Frank V. Addis then took up his abode on what is known 
as the old Addis homestead. Here he owns in one tract four himdred 
and eiglity-six acres, upon which are two good residences with all the 
other buildings and improvements of a model farm of the twentieth 
century. His real estate holdings likewise include another quarter 
section. He has remodeled the residence, keeps all of the buildings 
and fences in a state of good repair and in addition to cultivating the 
fields in the production of large crops of corn, wheat and other cereals 
he is engaged in raising and feeding stock. He is the administrator 
of the Addis estate and is a careful and competent business man, 
readily discriminating between the essential and the non-essential and 
quickly recognizing and improving his opportunities. 



324 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

To ]Mi'. and Mrs. Addis have been born three sons, Earl R.. who 
married JSIiss Maud Chamberlain, is now located on his father's farm, 
M'here his father has just completed a modern residence, one of the 
best in West Jersey township. Orville V. is farming one hundred 
and sixty acres of the home place. Glenn D., the youngest, is a 
student in the Toulon high school. 

Frank V. Addis devotes his time largely to the management of 
his farming properties and interests yet finds opportunity to aid in 
promoting the public welfare. He is a stanch advocate of repulilican 
princijjles and for a number of years served as highway commissioner, 
while in 1914 he was elected supervisor of West Jersey township and 
a member of the Stark county board. In 1016 he was re-elected 
and is now the incumbent in that office, giving earnest consideration 
to all of the questions which come up in connection with the care of 
the business of the county. He belongs to the West Jersey lodge of 
Odd Fellows, in which he has filled all of the chairs and is now a past 
grand, while for some years he has served as financial secretary. Both 
he and his wife are connected with the Rebekahs and they are mem- 
bers of the ^Methodist Episcopal church, ]Mr. Addis now serving on its 
official board. He was one of the promoters of the La Fayette Fair 
Association. His interests are broad and varied and in all of his 
business career the spirit of enterprise has enabled him to overcome 
all difficulties and obstacles in his path. He has advanced step by 
step, securing at every point in his career a broader outlook and wider 
opportunities and his ability and even paced energy have carried him 
into important relations. 



W. M. GOR]MAX. 



W. ]M. Gorman, ^vho owns and operates both elevators at Stark, 
has built up a large trade in grain and tile and is one of the leading 
business men of the town. He was born in Peoria. Illinois, on the 
4th of July. 1863. a son of Edward and Anne (INIorrissy) Gorman, 
both natives of County Kilkenny, Ireland. In 1847 the father emi- 
grated to America and for a time lived in the province of Quebec. 
Canada, and in Vermont. ])ut at length took up his residence at Peoria. 
Illinois. In 1881 he located upon a farm in Valley township. Stark 
county, where he died the same year. His wife has also passed away. 

W. 31. Gorman received a common school education and remained 
at home assisting liis father until he w^as about seventeen years old 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 325 

when he began working as a farm hand. Subsequentlj^ he followed 
agricultural piu-suits on his own account, but in the fall of 1897 he 
removed to the town of Stark and secured a position in the Stark 
elevator. He has since been identified with that business and now 
owns the elevator and also the other elevator in Stark. He buys and 
sells grain and also deals in tile and his reliability and liberal business 
l)olicy have enabled him to build up a fine business. 

]Mr. Gorman is a stanch advocate of democratic principles and has 
served in local offices, being a member of the county board for two 
years and town clerk for eight j^ears. He is a communicant of the 
Roman Catholic church at Princeville and fraternally is connected 
with the ^Modern AVoodnien of America at Stark, in which he is now 
holding office. His success is well deserved as it is the direct result of 
his enterprise, initiative and sound judgment. 



FRANK W. AND FRED W. HODGES. 

Frank W. and Fred ^V. Hodges, who are successfully engaged in 
farming and stock raising in Yalley township. Stark county, are 
operating under the firm name of Hodges Brothers. They are twins 
and were born on the lltli of June, 1878, sons of David and Nancy 
(Hutchinson) Hodges. The father was born in Kent county, 
England, on the 2.5th of February. 18-22. of the marriage of Thomas 
and ^lary (Hanford) Hodges. When thirteen years of age he accom- 
panied his parents to the United States and for some time lived in 
Sarotaga Springs, New York. In 18.51, however, he came to Stark 
county, Illinois, and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in 
Valley township. He soon afterward I'cturned to New York but the 
following year again visited Stark county. In 18.53 he took u]) his 
residence here. He was a practical farmer, and his well directed labors 
yielded him a good income. He was highly esteemed in his com- 
munity, and his death, which occurred in 1910, was the occasion of 
much sincere grief. He was married in 18.53, in New York, to ]\liss 
Jane Standish, a native of Saratoga county, and they became the 
parents of two children, Harvey and Joseph. The wife and mother 
died in 18.59 and in 18(50 ^Mr. Hodges was married to ]Mrs. Nancy 
Hutchinson, of Cliillicothe, Illinois, bv whom he had the followiuff 
children: Otis, Clarke, Sherman. Frank W. and Fred W. 

The two last named received a good education in the district 
schools and earlv became familiar with agricultural woik. Since the 



326 HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 

death of their father tlicy have enoaged in farming independently 
under the name of Hodges Brothers and they rank among tlie most 
substantial residents of ^^alley townshi]). They own six hundred and 
sixty acres of arable land and also a thirty-seven acre tract of timber 
land. They raise grain to some extent but give special attention to the 
feeding of stock for market. They are up-to-date and enterprising 
and ]-eceive a handsome income from their well directed labors. 

Both brothers are unmarried and tlieir mother has charge of the 
household affairs. They support the repiililican [jarty at the polls, 
and Fred W. has served as road commissioner and as scliool director. 
They are identitied with the Masonic lodge at Speer, Illinois, with tlie 
Royal Arch chapter at Wyoming, and their lives are in harmony with 
the beneficient teachings of the craft. They attentl the Congrega- 
tional church and take a notable interest in its work. They are highly 
esteemed where\'er known and most of all where best known. 



DAVID WEBSTER. 



David Webster is one of the few remaining soldiers of the Ci\"il 
war. He has the right to wear the little bronze button that proclaims 
him one of the defenders of the Union during the darkest hour of our 
comitry"s history. He enjoys meeting his old army comrades and 
recalling the incidents and events which occurred in southern camps 
and on southern battlefields. He is now numbered among the substan- 
tial farmers of West Jersey township, his home being on section 22, 
wliere he owns three hundred and eighty acres of valuable land in two 
adjoining and well improved farms. 

FcAv residents of Stark coimty have so long remained within its 
borders, for ]Mr. Webster is one of its native sons, his birth having 
occurred in West Jersey township, June 2,5, 1842. His father. 
W. W. Webster, was born in \\'ales and was of English descent. 
When a youth of sixteen years he came to the United States, joining 
a sister in Wellington. Ohio. \\ liere he resided for a time. Subse- 
quently he was married in Ashland, Ohio, to ]Miss Fanny Cupp, who 
was a native of Pennsylvania but was reared at Hackettstown. Xew 
Jersey, by Dr, Piatt, having been left an orphan at an early age. 
Following his marriage ]Mr. Webster engaged in farming in Ohio for 
a few years and for a time also devoted his attention to the manu- 
facture of potash. In 1832 he arrived in Illinois at a period when the 
work of progress and improvement seemed scarcely begun. Indeed, 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 327 

this was one of the pioneer districts of the country and civilization had 
penetrated hut httle farther west. He settled in Stark county, pre- 
empting three hiuidred and twenty acres of laiul on sections 82 and 33, 
West Jersey township. Of this one hundred and sixty acres Avas 
I^rairie and hrush land, while the remaining quarter section was 
covered with tiniher. He cleared away the brush and turned the first 
furrows upon the place. He harrowed his land, sowed the seed and 
with the coming of autumn harvested his first crops. He also fenced 
the farm and erected the necessary buildings upon the place, including 
a good residence and substantial barns. He likewise set out an orchard 
and did everything in his power to develop this into a good farm prop- 
erty. Success rewarded his efforts and his industry made him in time 
a prosperous citizen. For twenty-fom- years he continued to de\'elop 
his land and then j^assed away on the old homestead July 8. 18.5G. 
His wife survived him for a number of years, her death occin-ring in 
1871. 

David Webster was reared upon the old home farm in West Jersey 
township and had reached the age of twenty years when, on the 13th 
of August, 1862, he placed his name on the roll of Stark comity vol- 
unteers, joining Company F, One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois 
Infantry, under Colonel Henderson. The regiment went south into 
Kentucky and participated in a nmnber of hotly contested engage- 
ments. ]Mr. Webster was in the battle of Resaca, in the campaign 
against and the capture of Atlanta and with his command was after- 
ward sent back to Xashville. following which he participated in the 
battles of Franklin and Xashville, Tennessee, and Greensboro, Xorth 
Carolina. At the last named place he was mustered out and upon 
returning to the north was honorably discharged in Chicago, July 6, 
1865, after serving for almost three years as a private. He sustained 
three slight wounds but was not disabled for duty. He then returned 
to the old home farm, which he operated for his mother, caring for her, 
until her demise. 

It was on the 16th of JMarch, 1876, that David Webster married 
jNIiss iNIargaret Craig, who was born in ^laryland but was reared 
in Knox county, Illinois. Her parents emigrated to America from 
Scotland and became early settlers of Knox county. JNIr. and iVIrs. 
Webster have continuously resided upon the home farm on section 22, 
West Jersey township, and the visible evidence of his life of thrift 
and industry is seen in the substantial dwelling and the good barns 
and outbuildings which he has erected. He has also put up fences 
which divide the farm into fields of convenient size, has set out an 
orchard and planted ornamental trees and as the years have gone on 



328 mSTORV OF STxVRK COUNTY 

he has increased his farm from time to time until the eighty acre tract 
has been expanded into a farm of three hundred and eighty acres. 
Annually he gathers golden harvests as a reward for the care and 
labor which he bestows upon the fields and he raises a good grade of 
shorthorn cattle and also good horses and he likewise feeds and fattens 
cattle and hogs for the market, the various branches of his business 
returning him a substantial financial income. 

]Mr. and jMrs. Webster have become the parents of four sons and 
a daughter. Robert, who is married and has two children, now fol- 
lows farming near Toulon. Francis ]M., who is engaged in farming 
near Shelbina, jNlissouri, is married and has two sons. D. R. is mar- 
ried and has one son. James is at home. The daughter, jMaud, is the 
wife of Ward Hotchkiss, of West Jersey township. 

The father and sons are all members of the Odd Fellows lodge of 
West Jersey, in which ]Mr. Webster has filled all of the offices and 
is now past grand. jNIr. and ]Mrs. ^Vebster and their daughter are 
connected with the Rebekah degree. Politically Mr. Webster has 
been a lifelong republican, indorsing the principles of the party since 
age conferred upon him the right of franchise. Locally, however, 
where no issue is involved, he casts an independent ballot but he has 
never been ambitious to hold office. He is interested in the educa- 
tional progress of the community, howe^'er, and for some time ser\'ed 
on the school board. The Websters are numbered among the earliest 
families of this jjart of the state and from pioneer times the name 
has been synonymous A\ith progress and improvement in West Jersey 
township. They have ever stood for advancement, not only in a 
material w^ay, but in connection with the intellectual and moral prog- 
ress of the community, and their efforts have been of distinct wortli 
and value in promoting the welfare of Stark county. 



R. J. REWERTS. 



R. J. Rewerts owns and operates two hundred acres of good 
land on section 27, Penn township, and gives special attention to the 
raising of high grade stock. His birth occurred in Peoria. Illinois. 
on the •26th of August, 18G0, and he is a son of John R. and Fanny 
(Westerman) Rewerts, both natives of Germany. They came to the 
United States in early manhood and womanhood and were married 
in Peoria in the '50s. After living in that city for a time they took 
up their residence upon a farm near Dunlap and later came to Stark 



• 




K. J. KKWKKTS AM) l-'A.MILV 



LIBRARY 
OF !H£ 

.nvMirocjIV OF ILLI^'GIC 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 331 

coLintj', locating west of Castleton. After farming there for a time 
they removed to what is now known as the Fred Tess place. Subse- 
quently they removed to a farm north of Castleton, which belonged 
to Elijah Holmes, but at length the father purchased a tract of good 
land a half a mile from the Lincoln schoolhouse. The farm was 
totally unimproved when it came into his possession, but at the time 
of his death it was one of the well developed places of the locality. 
He was sur\'ived by his wife for several years. 

R. J. Rewerts received his education in the schools of Penn Center 
and remained at home until twenty-eight years of age. He then took 
up his residence upon his present farm, whicli comprises two hundred 
acres, and the fine improvements upon the place testify to his energy 
and efficiency. He grows the usual crops and also raises high grade 
stock and derives a gratifying financial return from both branches 
of his business. 

In 1888 occurred the marriage of "Sir. Rewerts and INIiss Bertha 
Stange, by whom he has had six children, namely: John, a resident 
of ^Marshall countj'; Fanny, who is keeping house for her brother 
John; Fred, at home; Elmer, also at home; Etta, in school; and one 
who died in infancy. 

]Mr. Rewerts belongs to the German Lutheran cliurch at Castleton 
and for many years has held the office of trustee, doing much in that 
time to promote the interests of the church. Politically he is a repub- 
lican, and for twenty-three years he has been a school director. He 
has also served for six years as trustee of the Valley cemeterj'. He 
has not only won financial success but has also gained the unquali- 
fied respect of all who come in contact with liim, and his personal 
friends are many. 



MARTIN B. DOWNEND. 

Since his youthful days INIartin B. Downend has lieen a resident of 
Stark county, where he ranks witli the most enterprising and ])ro- 
gressive farmers and stock breeders, making a specialty of handling- 
pure lilooded registered Hereford cattle, Poland China hogs and 
Percheron horses. He is a native of the neigliboring state of Indiana, 
born Xnveniber 22, 18r)0. His father, Tliomas Downend, was born 
in Eiighuid and came to the new world with his father, Thomas Down- 
end. Sr.. who settled in Ohio, in Avhich state the son was reared. There 
he wedded INIiss INIarv Bachtel, wlio -was born in the Buckeye state. 



332 HISTORY OF STARK COLXTY 

Thev afterward removed to Indiana, where 3Ir. Downend enyaged in 
farming for a number of years, during which period live children were 
born to them. About 1862 they removed with their family to Illinois, 
settling in Toulon township, Stark county, where ]\Ir. Downend again 
gave his attention to general agricultiu-al pursuits, thus providing a 
comfortable living for his family, whom he reared upon the home 
farm. He died about 1890, while liis widow, surviving hmi for a num- 
ber of years, passed away in 1913. 

^lartin B. Downend was but a young lad at the time of the arrival 
of the family in Stark county, so that the period of his boyhood and 
youth was spent on the homestead farm. Following the death of his 
father he cared for his mother throughout her declining years. For 
some time he worked by the month upon a farm but was ambitious 
to own land and carefully saved his earnings until he was able to pur- 
chase an im]:)roved farm of forty acres. He further perfected arrange- 
ments for having a home of his own in his marriage on the 21st of 
December, 1887, in Toulon to^\'nship. to ^Nliss Anna C. Brown, who 
was born and reared in this county and was educated in Toulon. She 
is a daughter of J. H. Brown, one of the pioneer settlers of this coimty, 
now living retired in Toulon. They began their domestic life on the 
little forty-acre farm, which ^Ir. Downend cultivated for six years. He 
then sold that property and within the city limits jjurchased a twenty- 
three acre tract, upon wliich he has since resided. Upon the place he 
has erected a good residence and he now has his land well improved. 
In addition ]Mr. Downend owns one hundred and sixty acres on section 
29, Toulon township, adjoining at one corner the corporate limits of 
the city. This is a well improved farm supplied with commodious and 
substantial buildings and a silo of recent construction. His farm work 
is conducted along progressive lines. He believes in the rotation of 
crops, in the use of fertilizers and all other methods that enhance the 
productiveness of his place. He now has forty-eight acres of alfalfa, 
from wliich he cuts three crops per year, a^■eraging four tons per acre. 
]Mr. Downend also owns another small farm of fifty-seven acres which 
is a well improved place, and he has twenty-three acres in another tract. 
His holdings now consist of foiu' different tracts, constituting two 
hundred and sixty-three acres of well improved and valuable farm 
land. Turning his attention to the breeding and raising of fine stock, 
he began handling Poland China hogs in 189.). Later he took up the 
business of raising Hereford cattle, commencing with three head, and 
lie now has a herd of sixty head of registered Herefords in addition to 
tliirty-five liead of high grade Herefords. He holds public sales of his 
reyistered Hereford cattle and Poland China hoas and he is now well 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 333 

known as a breeder, dealer and shipper of thoroughbred stock, includ- 
ing Percheron liorses. It is evident tliat success has attended him 
along the path of life, for in addition to his holdings in Stark county 
he also owns a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Delaware 
county, Iowa, and a forty-acre tract in ^Minnesota, all improved land. 
What he undertakes he accomplishes, and diligence and determination 
have enabled him to overcome all obstacles and ditliculties in his patli. 

To ]Mr. and 31rs. Dow nend have been born tlu'ee children : l^eslic 
L., who is married and is engaged in business in Toulon; Florence, 
who is a graduate of Denison University of Granville, Ohio, and has 
been a successsful teacher in Stark county; and Lucile, now attending 
school in Toulon. 

In politics ISlr. Downend has always been a republican since age 
conferred upon him the right of franchise and has served as highwaj' 
commissioner for a few years and also as a member of the city council 
for two terms but could never be counted a jiolitician in the usually 
acce])ted sense. However, he is not neglectful of the duties of citizen- 
ship and when in office made a most creditable record by bis fidelity 
and capability. He and his family are all members of the Baptist 
cliurch and he and his daughter Florence are active workers and teach- 
ers in the Sunday school. His life has ever been upright and honor- 
able, measuring up to the highest standards of manhood and 
citizenship. He has been found trustworthy in every relation of life 
and liis good qualities have gained for him the resi)ect and confidence 
of all witli whom lie has l)een associated. 



WILLIAM T. DITMON. 

William T. Ditmon owns one hundred acres of good land, which 
is being operated by his son, and is one of the substantial and well 
known residents of Valley township. His birth occurred in Chilli- 
cothe, Peoria county, Illinois, on the Ist of July, 1849, his parents 
being William and ]Margaret (Kaiser) Ditmon, both natives of Chilli- 
cothe, Ross county, Ohio. They remained there until 1848, when they 
removed by wagon to Illinois, reaching Peoria on the day that Zachary 
Taylor was elected i)resident. They located in Chillicothe. this state, 
liut in 18,56 took up their residence upon a farm on section 17, Valley 
township, Stark county, where they remained until 1878. Then they 
removed to Wyoming, this county, and the father lived retired until 
his demise six years later. He held the offices of justice of peace and 



334 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

school director and was highly esteemed in his community. His wife 
died April 25, 18T7. 

^ViIliam T. Ditmon attended the common schools in the acquire- 
ment of his education and remained at home until he was twenty-six 
years old. He then began farming on his own account and as the 
years have passed his resources have increased so that he now enjoys 
a comfortable competence and is living practically retired. Since 
coming to Stark county he has always resided on section 17, Valley 
township, and his present farm comprises one hundred acres of \alu- 
able land. He has brought the place to a high state of development, 
and the buildings, which are substantial and commodious, he erected 
himself. He engaged in raising Poland China hogs and Jersey cattle 
as well as the usual farm crops for many years but his farm is now 
being operated by his son. 

jMr. Ditmon was married in 1875 to INIiss Julia E. Jordan, a 
daughter of John Jordan, who was an early settler of Stark county. 
To this union have been born two children: John, who is farming 
the homestead; and Orpha, the wife of G. W. Jackson, of Stark 
county. 

]Mr. Ditmon was reared in the political faith of the democratic party 
as his father supported that organization, and he has loyally supported 
its candidates since attaining his majority. For fifteen consecutive 
years he has held the office of treasurer of the school board, and he also 
is now serving as justice of the peace. Both he and his wife are mem- 
bers of the Congregational church at Stark and he is a member of its 
board of trustees. In 1876 he was made a ^Master ^lason at Wyo- 
ming, Illinois, and has ever since taken a keep interest in the work 
of the craft. He is also connected fraternally with the jNIodern 
AYoodmen of America at Wyoming 'and with the ^Maccabees at 
Stark, in which he has served as commander for nineteen consecutive 
years. In all the relations of life he has measured up to high stand- 
ards of manhood and is most highly esteemed where best known. 



ALBERT H. JACKSOX. 



Agricultural interests find a worthy rej^resentative in Albert H. 
Jackson, who is living on section 18, Goshen township, where he owns 
and o])erates a farm of two hundred acres of valuable land adjacent 
to La Fayette. It was in La Fayette that his birth occurred Decem- 
])er 25. 1840, and through the intervening period of seventy-six years 





BAKNABAS N. JACKSON ■ MRS. BARNABAS N. JACKSON 



LlBRAftV 

OF TH& 

"^'iirocifv OF ILLIMCIS 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 337 

he has lived in this jjart of the state, behig known among its pioneer 
settlers and representative men. 

His father, JBarnabas X. Jackson, was burn in Goshen, Orange 
county, New York, in the year 1807, and was a son of Jonathan H. 
Jackson, also a native of the Empire state. He removed from tliere 
to Ohio and became one of the pioneer settlers of the town of Goshen, 
Clermont coimty. Barnabas Jackson was reared in that county and 
was there married to JNliss Jane Sleeks, a native of Ohio and a repre- 
sentative of one of the early pioneer families of Clermont county. In 
1838 jMr. Jackson removed from Ohio to Illinois, making the trip by 
way of the Ohio river to Cairo, thence up the ^lississij^in to St. Louis 
and then up the Illinois river to Peoria, whence he came direct to Stark 
county and made a permanent location upon the site of the j^resent 
town of La Fayette. There were few settlers in tlie comity at that 
time and with the work of pioneer development and improvement he 
became closely associated. He was elected the first recorder of deeds 
in Stark county and was otherwise identified with public interests. 
In 1844 he was elected to the state legislature and served for one term. 
At La Fayette he engaged in merchandising for ten years and later 
made purchase of two hundred acres of land, whereon he built a resi- 
dence, which at the time was the largest and best in tlie entire county. 
He also owned another farm in the same district although across the 
boundary line in Knox county. It was in 18.54 that he took up his 
abode upon a farm in Goshen townsliip. Stark county, and there he 
successfully carried on general agricultural ])ursuits. his business abil- 
ity and enterprise winning for him a gratifying measure of prosperity. 
Upon that place he reared his family and spent his last years, his death 
occurring in 1877, while his wife survived only until 1879. In their 
familv were seven sons and two daughters, of whom four sons and one 
daughter are yet living, these being Albert II., Barnabas jSI., Charles 
W., Phineas T. and Lena J., who is the wife of George W. Potter, 
a I'etired farmer of Galva. Of this family Phineas has for fifteen 
years been a business man of Chicago. 

^Mbert H. Jackson was reared upon the old homestead farm and 
early became familiar Avith the best methods of tilling the soil and 
caring for the crops. He attended the public schools and after his 
education was completed he gave his entire attention to farm work, 
assisting liis fatlier until the latter's death. He then assumed the 
management of the old home property and has made it one of tlie 
valualile farms of the county. All of the buildings upon the place are 
kept in excellent condition, the fences are in good repair and eacli 
branch of the farm work is carefully, systematicallv and Aviselv man- 



338 HISTOKV OF STARK COUNTY 

aged. In addition to cultivating tlie crops best adajJted to soil and 
climate he also makes a business of raising and feeding stock, largely 
handling hogs, of which he ships from two to four carloads annually. 
He has also set out two orchards and the farm is attractive in its 
various features and is bringing good returns to the three brothers, 
^Vlbert II., Barnabas 31. and Thomas W., who are connected in the 
conduct of the business. 

Albert H. Jackson was one of the promoters of the La Fayette 
Fail- Association and is one of its cHrectors. He is also a stockholder 
in the La Fayette Hotel Company, and in business aft'airs he displays 
sound judgment and unremitting energy. His political allegiance is 
given to the democratic party but the desire of office as a reward for 
party fealty has never been his. He has served, however, as a delegate 
to county and congressional conventions, and his opinions have carried 
weight in local councils. He has spent almost his entire life upon the 
home farm whereon he now resides, the only excei^tion being one and 
a half years passed ujjon a farm in Knox county. His long residence 
here has made him widely known; his sterling worth has gained him 
Jiigh regard; and he enjoys the confidence and good-will of the entire 
communitv. 



WALTER B. FIXLY 



Walter B. Finly. who is successfully operating the Hazel Hill 
Stock Farm on section 35, West Jersey township, has concentrated his 
energies upon the raising of pure-blood shorthorn cattle and is recog- 
nized as one of the most progressive stock breeders of Stark county. 
His birth occurred upon that farm Jidy 26, 1866, and he is a son of 
A. J. Finly, who was born in Ashland county. Ohio. The latter was 
taken from Ohio to Illinois when a child as his father, John Finly, 
was one of the very first settlers of Stark county. A. J. Finly was 
reared in this county and was here married in 1850 to ]Miss ^Margaret 
Carter, a native of the county. He became the owner of the old home 
farm which for many years has been known as the Hazel Hill Stock 
Farm and made many improvements upon the ])lace. He was one of 
the first of the county to engage in breeding high grade shorthorn 
cattle and was influential in the advancement of the stock raising 
industry here. After residing in this county for many years he 
removed to Shenandoah. Iowa, but two years later went to San Diego, 
California, where he now lives. He and his wife celebrated their 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 339 

sixty-fifth wedding anniversary on October 6, 1915, on which occasion 
they received the congratulations and best wishes of their many 
friends. AVhile hving in Stark county JNIr. Finly was elected to a 
number of offices and proved capable and conscientious in the dis- 
charge of his duties. 

^^^alter R. Finl>-, who is one of a family of four sons and five 
daughters, all of whom are living, was reared upon the homestead and 
divided his time as a lioy and youth between attending the district 
schools and assisting his father. About four years before the latter 
left the county our subject took charge of the operation of the Hazel 
Hill Stock Farm and has since managed the place. It comprises about 
four hundred acres of excellent land and the improvements thereon 
compare favoral)ly with those on other farms in the county. He has 
not only kept everything in excellent condition but has also erected a 
silo and in other ways added to the value of the property. He raises 
pure-blooded shortboi'n cattle and finds no difticulty in disposing of 
his stock at high prices, and he also feeds cattle and hogs for market. 

On the 23d day of May, 1894-, at \Vy()ming, occurred the marriage 
of Mr. Finly and INIiss Nora Alderman, a daughter of ^Michael and 
Louise (Joicy) Alderman of that town. JNIr. and JNIrs. Finly took a 
trip to the Pacific coast in 191.) visiting the exposition at San Fran- 
cisco and remained for some time with his parents in San Diego, being- 
present at the celebration of their sixty-fifth wedding anniversary 
on October Gth. 191.5. Our sul)ject was the only one of the children 
present on that occasion. He is in excellent circumstances financially, 
and it is generally recognized that his success has been founded upon 
his industry and his wise management of his affairs. Although he has 
given practically his undivided attention to his farm work he has never 
been i-emiss in any of his duties as a citizen and supjjorts those move- 
ments seeking the advancement of his community. In politics he is a 
republican. His friends are many and his genuine worth is attested 
by the fact that those who know him most intimately hold him in the 
highest esteem. 



MRS. SARAH J. ROYD. 

Among the well known residents of West Jersey township is Mrs. 
Sarah J. Royd, who makes her home on section 10 of that township 
and who came to this state with her father, Jacob Kissel, in 1860. The 
latter was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and after arriv- 



340 HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 

iiig at years of maturity he was there married to ]Miss Hester Clouser, 
also a native of the Keystone state. He followed f armina- in Pennsvl- 
vania for a nmiiber of years, but the opportunities of the middle \\est 
attracted him and he left Pennsylvania for Indiana, spending two 
years in Henry county, that state. Subsequently he became a resi- 
dent of Wisconsin and after residing in Lancaster for two years he 
removed to Dodge county, Xebraska. making investment in three 
hundred acres of land near Fremont. He spent six years there in 
trying to improve and develop his farm, but the droughts and the 
grasshoj^jjcrs rendered it imi^ossible for him to raise crops and he 
therefore retraced his steps to a point east of the ]Mississippi. settling 
in West Jersey township, Stark county, Illinois, in 1860. At first 
he rented land which he cultivated for a few years and here his labors 
were rewarded with good harvests, the sale of which brought him 
sufficient capital to enable him to jjurchase an eighty acre tract of land. 
Immediately he began farming thereon and continued to make that 
place his abode until called to his final rest. His wife survived him 
for six years and during that period resided with her daughter. 3Irs. 
Boyd. 

Mrs. Boyd was born in Stark county and on the 2d of February, 
1870, gave her hand in marriage to Robert A. Boyd, Avho was born in 
Warren county. Xew Jersey. When a young man he removed west- 
ward and took up his abode in Stark county on land which his father 
had previously purchased. It was at that time unimproved, but ^Ir. 
Boyd broke the sod, planted the fields and carried on the work of 
development. It a\ as upon the farm where she now resides that ]Mr. 
and ]Mrs. Boyd began their domestic life. To his original tract of 
eighty acres he added by the purchase of another eighty, thus making 
his farm an entire quarter section. He also wrought a marked trans- 
formation in its aj^pearance by the erection of a good residence and 
by tlie building of commodious barns. Industrious, alert and per- 
severing, he won a substantial measure of prosperity and gained rec- 
ognition as one of the foremost representatives of farming interests 
in his locality. He continued to reside u])on the farm until his life's 
labors were ended in death in 1891. at which time he was laid to rest 
in the West Jersey cemetery. Fraternally he was connected with the 
Odd Fellows lodge at West Jersey and his life v.as guided by his religi- 
ous faith, which was manifest in his membership in the ]Methodist Epis- 
copal church. 

xVfter the death of her husband ]Mrs. Boyd employed help and 
continued to carry on the work of the farm for seven years, proving 
\evy successful in the management of her business interests. Later, 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 3ii 

however, she rented this farm. She has one son, Clyde H. Boyd, a 
resident of Tonlon, who is married and has two children. She has also 
reared a niece, Miss Grace Hamilton, who became a member of her 
household when six years of age and is now a junior in the Toulon 
high school. JNIrs. Boyd is a member of the West Jersey JNIethodist 
Episcopal church and was formerly very active in church and Sunday 
school work. She is widely known in this part of the state and her 
kindly spirit, iher generous disi^osition and ready sympathy have 
gained for her the high esteem and ^\arm regard of all who know her. 



HARRY BARTON. 



Harry Barton, reared to the occupation of farming, has always 
followed that jjursnit and is now engaged in the cultivation of one 
hundred and twenty acres of land, eighty acres of which he owns. 
The place is situated on section 7, Penn township, and in its neat and 
attractive apjiearance indicates his careful supervision and wise con- 
trol. He Avas born February 24, 1873, a son of Joseph and Frances 
(Roper) Barton, both of whom were natives of England, where they 
were reared and married. In 1872 they came to the United States, 
settling in Kewanee, Illinois, and there Mr. Barton remained until 
after the birth of his son Harry. Subsequent to that event the family 
became residents of Toulon Township, where the father is still living", 
but the mother passed away November 19. 1912. 

Plarry Barton obtained a district school education, supplemented 
by study in the schools of Castleton. At an early age he became 
familiar with the work of tilling the soil and cultivating the crops and 
continued to assist his father in farm work until he attained his major- 
ity, when he began the cultivation of a part of the old homestead on 
his own account. After living there for four A^ears he and his brother 
rented land in Penn township, upon which Harry Barton resided for 
eleven years. He next purchased his present place of residence, his 
home farm now comprising eighty acres of land on section 7. Penn 
township. To this he has added some improvements and now has a 
clean, well kept farm presenting a most attractive and pleasing ap- 
jiearance. He cultivates altogether one hundred and twenty acres of 
land, devoting his attention to general agricultural pursuits. 

On the .5th of February, 1914, IMr. Barton was joined in wedlock 
to Miss ]Mary Sterling. Politicallj^ a democrat, ]\Ir. Barton has always 
loyally adhered to the j^rinciples of the party and upon its ticket has 



342 IIISTOllY OF STAllK COUNTY 

been elected to several local offices. For the past five years he has 
served as supervisor, for two years was assessor and for one year 
was collector. In each of these positions he proved his capability and 
fidelity and his course was highly conunended. Fraternally he is 
connected with the Odd Fellows lodge at Castleton, tlie encampment 
at Wyoming and the ^Modern Woodmen canq) at Castletoli. He has 
become well known through fraternal, business and social relations 
and high regard is entertained for him by a large circle of friends and 
acquaintances. 



GEORGE W. PIERSOX. 

George W. Pierson is a jiractical mechanic who in early life learned 
the blacksmith's trade and since 1902 has carried on business along that 
line at La Fayette. He dates his residence in Stark county from 1867. 
arriving here when a youth of eleven years. He was born in ^Varren 
County, New Jersey, August 4, 1856, and is a son of Willis Pierson, 
who was also a native of New Jersey, where he was reared and mar- 
ried, the lady of his choice being ]Miss ]Mary Bryan, who was born 
and reared in New Jersey. The fathei" followed farming in that state 
for a number of years and at the time of the Civil war joined the 
Thirty-first Regiment of Volunteer infantry in New Jersey, serving 
with that command for three years and nine months, after which he 
was honorably discharged and mustered out following the close of 
the war. He then returned to his nati\e state, where he again engaged 
in farming until 1867, when he came to Illinois, making his way direct 
to Stark county. He took up his abode in West Jersey township, set- 
tling on a farm, Avhere he continued to reside until his death. His 
wife was a resident of this county for more than three decades, pass- 
ing away in ]May, 1898. 

George W. Pierson was reared in Stark comity from the age of 
eleven years and the public schools afforded him his educational op- 
portvmities. Starting out in life he entered a shop in ^Vest Jersey 
and learned the blacksmith's trade, after which he engaged in busi- 
ness on his own accoimt there for thirteen years. In 1902 he disposed 
of Iiis interests at West Jersey and went to La Fa5-ette, where he 
purcliased a lot and built a large shop, in which he is now engaged in 
blacksmithing and repair work. He does wood work as well as black- 
smithing and repairs wagons, buggies, etc. His business has been 
developed to large proportions and brings him a substantial annual 



HISTORY OF STARK COUNTY 343 



income. He is industrious and energetic and whatever he undertakes 
is carried forward to successful completion. 

jNIr. Pierson was married at West Jersey, December 19, 1875, to 
Miss Laura Scantlin, a native of this county. They ha\e liecome 
parents of five children: Frank, Avho is engaged in blacksmithing at 
Castleton; Jesse, who is married and is engaged in business at Wil- 
liamsfield; Mary, the wife of Clyde Schneilaker, a farmer of South 
Dakota; Belle, the wife of Archie Wapple. of Oneida, Illinois; and 
George. a\1io completes the family. 

The parents are members of the La Fayette ^Methodist Episcopal 
Church. ]Mrs. Pierson takes a very active and helpful interest in 
church and Sunday school work and has acted as superintendent of 
the Sunday school. Mr. Pierson belongs to the Odd Fellows lodge 
and he and his wife are connected with the Rebekah degree. He 
has served as noble grand and has been representative of the local 
organization of the grand lodge. Politically he has always been iden- 
tified with the republican party and he has served for three j^ears as a 
member of the village board of La Fayette. He was one of the pro- 
moters of the La Fayette Fair Association, of which he is a stock- 
holder. He stands at all times as an advocate of those progressive 
movements which feature in the welfare and upbuilding of the dis- 
trict in which he lives. He has ever worked hard, is a self-made man 
and his record indicates what may be accomplished by persistent energy 
and honorable dealing. 



W. W. WRIGHT, Jr. 

The history of W. W. Wright, Sr., appears elsewhere in this vol- 
ume and W. W. Wright, Jr., is certainly "a chii) off the old block." 
He was born in Toulon and his entire life has been spent here except 
the few years when he attended the University of Illinois and the 
Law School of Boston. He will be thirty-eight years of age on the 
r2th of August, 1916. His wife was INIiss Phoebe Robbins of 
Emmettsburg, Iowa. This happy union has been blessed with two 
bright-eyed boys. William Wilbnrforce, who will be six years of age 
in July, 1910, and John, who is three years of age. William \Vilbur- 
force is the fourth in a direct line to be honored by this name. 

W. W. Wright is an attorney at law and also a farmer. While 
caring for his full share of legal business he also cultivates many 
acres of the best farm land in the state and his fine stock is never 



344 HISTORY OF STARK COUXTY 

neelected. He resides in a beautiful liunic in the suburbs of our 
little city and is one of Toulon's best boosters. His public spirit knows 
no bounds and his pocketbook always opens when anything is needed 
that will benefit his town. 

The historian regrets that he is unable to get a better biography of 
jNIr. Wright, but the history is published just at the time Avhen farm 
work and professional duties are both crowding him and the above 
items were collected from his friends and without his knowledge. But 
a history of Stark county without mention of the Wright family 
would be unworthy of the name of a history. 3Ir. Wright's great- 
uncle, Samuel G. Wright, was the pioneer minister to locate here, and 
his father and grandfather were men whose moral influence is still 
at work. He springs from a family remarkable for unswerving faith 
in Christianity. Captain William Wright, grandfather of W. W. 
Wi-ight, gave his life for his country and received his death wound 
upon the battlefield of Resaca. 



INDEX 



Adams, A.J l** 

Adams, H. F 86 

Adams, R. A 310 

Addis, F V 318 

Allen, John 379 

Arganbright, Elting 155 

Armstrong, George 148 

Bacmeister, Theodore 154 

Baker. G. C 163 

Ballentine, W. B 103 

Bart(m, A. L 241 

Barton, Harry 341 

Bass, E. B. .' 160 

Black, J. R 48 

Bocock, C. W 186 

Bocock, Cyrus 20 

Bocoek, W. C 41 

Bowes, C. A 317 

Boyd, Sarah J 339 

Breen, R. L 18 

Brown, Fred 238 

Brown, f4. W 248 

Buffum, E. S 219 

Carstairs, David 249 

Caverlv. E. C 264 

Champ'ion, W. N. 254 

Chase, Joseph 76 

Church, T. D 234 

ClaybauRh, C. B 93 

Coliran, Frank 121 

Colwell. Henry 183 

Colwell, P. B 165 

Cooper, A. C 300 

Corrington, Nathan 284 

Crum, B. W 252 

Deisher, C. J 9 

Dewey, C. P 17 

De Wolf, Hymen 143 

Dexter, Grant 275 

Dexter, W. C 281 

Devo, Albert 168 

Ditmon, W. T 333 

Down, .John 315 

Down, Samuel 315 

Downend, M. B 331 

Duckworth, Henry 233 

Fell, D. K 175 

Ferris, F. E 85 

Finly, W. B 338 

Finnegan, J. F 59 

Fleming, F. H 313 

Fleming, J. C 144 

Fling, J. W., Jr 170 



Fowler, C. D 289 

Fox, J. T 286 

Fulks. Levi 179 

Fulk, W. D 218 

Fuller, F. A 294 

(Jelvin.-F. T 99 

Gerard, J. L 84 

Gingrich, S. B 244 

Gleason, J. S 295 

Good. C.N 75 

Gorman, W. M 324 

Grant, Nel.son 116 

Graves, B. F 51 

Graves, E. V 308 

Graves, Q. 1 251 

Grieve, A. R 240 

Grieve, W. E 169 

Griswold, C. H 195 

Hall, J. K 6 

Hall, Samuel 212 

Hall, Thomas 146 

Hallock, F. B 296 

Halsted, E. L 282 

Hanks, S. L 135 

Hartley, Edwin 310 

Hartley, .Tames 27 

Hatch." 0. L 28 

Hay. M. L 58 

Hewitt, W. H 189 

Hoadli'V, Tliomas 46 

Hodges', Frank W 325 

Hodges, Fred W 325 

Hodges, Otis 285 

Holgate, James 133 

Holgate, J. R 61 

Holgate, William 105 

Holmes. Edwin 224 

Hopkins, H. P 177 

House, ,T. W ,211 

Hulsizer, W. L 206 

Hunter, R. J 45 

Jackson, A. H 334 

Jackson, C. R 309 

Jackson, M. J 122 

Jackson, R. C 201 

Jackson, Rhoda M 8 

Janes, A. M 343 

Kelly, T. T 391 

Kidci, J. A 276 

Kidd. T. J 180 

King, A. W 372 

King, R. M 74 

Kopp, .J. H 159 

345 



346 



INDEX 



Lackie, R. Y 12( 

Leot, William 90 

Liggett, J. M 68 

Ligaett. W. R 3 1 

Lloyd, EH 38 

McBocook, Robert 00 

McClellan, R. L 118 

McClenalian, F. C 94 

McKee. C. S 185 

INIcKenzie, :Mr. and llrs. Alexander 197 

McManus, P. W 40 

Mahanv, J. J ^16 

Mahler, J. W 293 

Mallett, G. S 237 

Mallett, Hugh J 

Malone. Samuel 253 

Marsh, G. A 123 

Slarshall, D. M 283 

Martin, H. D. D 166 

Merna, G. W 263 

Miner. C. R 8" 

Illyers, Charles 12-t 

Nelson, W. N . . . • - 31 

Nixon, W.E 259 

Nowlan. J. A 15 

Oliver. G. T 304 

O^Neill, J. E 293 

Owens, D. J 222 

Packer. E. B 62 

Parish, Pethuel lOG 

Parish, W. H 271 

Phenix, Abrara 230 

Phenix, B. D 205 

Phenix, D. B 90 

Phenix, Hr.rmon 32 

Pierson, 6. W 342 



Piatt, G. C 196 

Price, W. F l^' 

Redfield, Mary R 128 

Reed, L C 52 

Kewerts, R. J 328 

Rist, J. W •■•■ 133 

Rogers, J. T 266 

Sandham, W. R 138 

Scott. R. M 83 

Sickles, W. U 101 

Smith, BjTon 101 

Sorenson, Christie 269 

Spencer, I. M 10 

Springer, G. W H* 

Steward, L F 270 

Sturm, CD l'i'3 

Sturm, J. H 136 

Ternns. Peter 113 

Thomas, Frank 5 

Thompson, Robert 50 

Thurston, C. G 16 

Turnbull. A. D 43 

Turnbull, A. 147 

Turnbull, Edwin 239 

Turnbull, G. il 233 

Walker, G. S 71 

Walker, H. W 73 

Walters, J. W 262 

Wasson, G. A 302 

Webster, David 326 

AMieeler, R. E 202 

Whisker. D. H 145 

Williams. W. C 250 

Winaus, Harriet E 203 

Wright, W. W 300 

Wright. W^ W., Jr 343 

Young, W. F 188 



L